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CHHS-S102 Syllabus

Continued

Indiana University

School of Social Work

 

S100 (new number S102) Understanding Diversity in a Pluralistic Society (3 Cr)

 

 

Section: 33491 online

Instructor Name: Elena Mrozinske, LCSW LCAC

Semester: Fall 2012                          

Office Location: MPB 3rd floor Social Work

Time: TBA                            

Office Hours: by appointment

Day: TBA                               

Phone: 219-980-6727

Room: TBA    

Email: emrozins@iun.edu

 

Course Description and Place in the Curriculum  

 

This course covers theories and models that enhance understanding of our diverse society.  It provides content about differences and similarities in the experiences, needs and beliefs of selected minority groups and their relation to the majority group. These groups include, but are not limited to, people of color, women, gay, lesbian, and bisexual persons. This course analyzes the interrelationship of race, class, age, ethnicity, and gender and how these factors influence the social values regarding economic and social justice. Course content will be integrated through student writing and presentations.

 

The Council on Social Work Education (CSWE), the accrediting body for Schools of Social Work, requires Social Work Programs to demonstrate how each course in the curriculum helps students develop competencies expected of all who seek entry into the profession.  Programs must document a match between course content and CSWE competencies defined in Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards (EPAS).  This course, required in the BSW curriculum, draws upon basic knowledge and understanding of our diverse society. Course content contributes to building knowledge and skills for students to demonstrate EPAS (CSWE, 2008) competencies 2.1.2 (values and ethics), 2.1.3 (critical thinking), 2.1.4 (engage diversity and difference in practice), and 2.1.5 (advance human rights and social and economic justice).

Course Objectives and Competencies

 

Through active participation in the learning experiences and completion of the readings, assignments, and learning projects offered throughout this course, students are expected to demonstrate the ability to:

S100-01:  Understand oneself in a diverse society [EP 2.1.4].

S100-02:  Understand the concepts of race, ethnicity, cultural diversity, minority status, sexual    orientation, class, racism, ageism, sexism, ableism, prejudice, discrimination, and cultural competence [EP 2.1.3 and 2.1.4].

S100-03:  Explain the major theories of power and inequality and the implications for social and economic justice [EP 2.1.4 and 2.1.5].

S100-04:  Explain the varieties of cultural heritages in the United States [EP 2.1.4].

S100-05: Demonstrate understanding, appreciation, and personal sensitivity to the unique life- styles, customs, value systems, aspiration, and experiences of minorities of color, women,  gay, lesbian, and bisexual persons in the United States [EP 2.1.4].

S100-06: Explain the moral, ethical and social consequences of minority/majority relations in the United States [EP 2.1.2 and 2.1.4].

S100-07: Demonstrate increased objectivity in considering the means by which to change minority/majority relations and reduce conflict [EP 2.1.3].

S100-08: Understand one’s own values and beliefs and their implications for relationships with persons from other backgrounds [EP 2.1.2 and 2.1.3].

 

Content Outline and Reading Assignments

 

Session 1                                 Introduction to the Course

Review of Syllabus  

Review of OnCourse

Introductions

                                                Begin Group Assignments

Session 2                                 Conceptual Frameworks

  • Social Constructs
  • Identity Formation
  • Construction of Our Unique Identities
  • Social Attitudes and their Influence in Shaping Identity

                                                Readings: Adams et al, Section 1:

                                                Introduction

The Complexity of Identity: Who am I?

                                                Five Faces of Oppression

The Cycle of Socialization

                                                Review of APA

                                                           

Session 3                                 Continuation of Conceptual Frameworks

  • Social Constructs
  • Identity Formation
  • Construction of Our Unique Identities
  • Social Attitudes and their Influence in Shaping Identity

 

                                                Readings: Adams et al.,  Section 1:

                                                The Social Construction of Differences

The Cycle of Liberation

                                               

 

Session 4                                 Racism

  • History of Racism in America
  • Debates on Racial and Ethnic Classification
  • Race and Ethnicity as Social Constructs
  • Prejudice and Discrimination
  • Immigrants, Assimilation and the Melting Pot

 

                                                Readings: Adams et al., Section 2:

                                                Introduction

Defining Racism: Can We Talk?

A Different Mirror

                                                Symbolic Racism: History and Reality…

                                                La conciencia de la mestiza: Towards a New Consciousness

 

Session 5                                 Racism and Personal Voices

  • How Others Perceive Us?
  • Diversity of Ethnic Experiences
  • Influence of Language

 

                                                Readings: Adams et al., Section 2:

                                                Finding My Eye-dentity

                                                Identification Pleas

                                                The Arab Woman and I

                                                My Tongue is Divided into Two

                                                The Emperor’s Clothes

                                                FLEXing Cross-cultural Communication      

 

 

Session 6                                 Classism

  • Inequality
  • Prison and Poor
  • Debates on Affirmative Action
  • The Super Class

 

Readings: Adams et al., Section 3:

                                                Introduction                                        

Class in America

                                                Class in America

The Dangerous Consequences of Growing Inequality

                                                Race, Wealth, and Inequality

                                                At the Elite Colleges

                                                The Debt-For-Diploma System

                                                Unnatural Disasters: Race and Poverty

                                                Migrant Tomato Workers Face Chronic Abuse

                                                White Poverty: The Politics of Invisibility

                                                Distributing Income: You be the Judge

 

Session 7                                 Sexism

  • Roots of Patriarchy
  • Construction of Male and Female Roles
  • Feminism
  • Sexual Harassment
  • Violence Against Women
  • Women’s Consciousness Raising

                                                Readings: Adams et al., Section 5:

                                                Introduction

Night to His Day: The Social Construction of Gender

Masculinity as Homophobia: Fear, Sahme, and Silence…

                                                Patriarchy, The System: An It, Not a he, a… 

Feminism: A Movement to End Sexist Oppression

To Stop the Violence Against Women

Stop the False Race/Gender Divide: A Call to Action

 

                                               

Session 8                                 Heterosexism

  • Sexual Orientation
  • Homophobia
  • Fear, Shame and Silence

 

                                                Readings: Adams et al., Section 6:

                                                Introduction

How Homophobia Hurts Everyone

                                                Biphobia

Privilege

Sport: Where Men Are Men and Women are Trespassers

Taking Gay Insults Personally

Becoming An Ally: A New Examination

 

                                               

Session 9                                 Transgender Oppression

  • Invisibility Dilemmas
  • Politicization of Marriage and Sexuality
  • Employment Discrimination

 

Readings: Adams et al., Section 7:

Introduction

How Sex Changed: A History of Transexuality in the US

Transgender Liberation

Mutilating Gender

The Evolution of Employment Discrimination Protections…

An Entire Rainbow of Possibilities

Calling All Restrooms Revolutionaries!

                                                 

 

                                                                       

Session 10                               Ableism

  • Economic/Social Inequality of Special Needs Communities 
  • Socially/Economic Invisibility of the Deaf and Blind
  • Stigma and Fear of Special Needs Culture
  • Disability and the Fight for Equal Rights in the Workplace

                                                Readings: Adams et al., Section 8:

                                                Introduction

Struggle for Freedom: Disability Rights Movement

                                                The Social Construction of Disability

                                                Go to the Margins of the Class: Disability and Hate Crimes

                                                The Gulf Wars Troubling Legacy

                                                Gawking, Gaping, Staring

                                                Toward Ending Ableism in Education

                                                Recognizing Ableist Beliefs and Practices and Taking Action…

                       

Session 11                               Ageism and Adultism

  • Stereotypes of Age
  • Paying to Look Young

                                                           

                                                Readings: Adams et al., Section 9:

                                                Introduction

                                                Police Make Life Hell for Youth of Color

                                                Ageism Another Form of Bigotry

                                                Aging with Disabilities

                                                Black Elderly

                                                People of Color over Fifty

                                                Allies to Young People: Tips and Guidelines

                                                What Allies of Elders Can do

 

                       

Session 12                               Classism

  • Wealth Distribution and Inequality
  • The Vanishing Middle Class in America
  • Normalizing Poverty and Blaming the Poor

                                                Readings:  Adames et al., Section 3:

                                                Classism From Our Mouths and Tips From Working Class…

Deep Thoughts About Class Privilege

                                               

Session 13                               Religious Oppression

  • Religious Privilege
  • Anti-Semitism
  • Safe Spaces
  • Interfaith-Organizing 

                                                Readings: Adams et al., Section 4:

                                                Introduction

Christian Privilege: Breaking a Sacred Taboo

                                                Religious Oppression of Indian Americans…

                                                Maps-History of Anti-Semitism

                                                A Somali Influx Unsettles Latino Meatpackers

                                                Creating Identity-Safe Spaces on College Campuses for Muslims…

                                                Pioneers in Dialogue: Jews Building Bridges

 

Session 14                   Working for Social Justice

  • Social Change Makers
  • Breaking Barriers
  • How to Organize
  • Using the Media in the Lobby for Rights
  • Empowering Ourselves and Our Communities

                                                Readings: Adams et al., Section 10:

                                                Introduction

Reflections on Liberations

                                                Toward a New Vision: Race, Class, and Gender

                                                What Can We Do?

                                                Allies

                                                Bridging Differences through Dialogue

                                                           

Session 15                               Group Presentations

 

Session 16                               Final Class and Course Evaluations

 

 

 

Required and Recommended Texts and Journal Articles

Required:

 

Adams, M., Blumenfeld, W.J., Castaneda, R., Hackman, H.W., Peters, M.L., & Zuniga, X. (2010).

             Readings for diversity and social justice: An anthology on racism, antisemitism, sexism,

 heterosexism, ableism, and classism (2nd ed.). New York: Routledge.  

Recommended:

American Psychological Association. (2010). Publication manual of the American Psychological

Association (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author.

Jumpper-Black, C. & Khaja, K. (2011). Seeing different views of the elephant: Exercises in

appreciating  diversity. Dubuque, IA: Kendall Hunt Publishing Company. 

You may want to visit the following websites:

http://www.apastyle.org/

http://webster.comment.edu/apa/apa_index.htm

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/  - on line writing laboratory at Purdue University

Assignments

Indiana University School of Social Work (IUSSW) utilizes an eportfolio system to document student achievement of CSWE competencies.  Students admitted to the Social Work Program are expected to provide evidence of CSWE mandated competencies and practice behaviors, which are behavioral manifestations defined in the Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards (EPAS).  Below you will read about specific assignments.  The completed assignment may provide evidence of a competency for a specific Practice Behavior and may be useful to document your achievement of the competency in the eportoflio.  You should save an electronic copy of your assignments as one or more may be useful to document competencies. You will learn more about the eportfolio after admission to the program. 

  1. 1.      Group Power Point Presentation: Getting Into the Lens of the Other

[EPAS 2.1.2, and 2.1.4]

Groups will be determined comprising of no more than (3) students. Each group will pick a diverse population related to readings in the course. The purpose of this group assignment is for students to learn to recognize how a culture’s structure and values may impact privilege and power, gain self-awareness to eliminate the influence of personal biases and values in working with diverse groups, recognize and communicate understanding of the importance of difference in shaping life experiences, and be active as learners to engage diverse populations. This group assignment provides students an opportunity to critically learn about their assumptions about a diverse population and conduct an empirical review of the literature to develop a better appreciation and understanding of diverse populations. Each group will present a 15 minute voice narrated power point presentation submitted in FORUMS where they will critically share: assumptions, values and beliefs about the chosen population; media depiction and stereotypes about the population; people interviewed to learn more about the population; empirical research on the population; and how social work professionals can best serve the population. The presentation will be graded on the following criteria: diversity course content; organization; recommendations; power point in adherence with APA, and creativity. Each student is responsible for taking each group members email and phone number and to be in contact on a regular basis. Please note it is the groups’ responsibility to make sure everyone works as a reliable team. A grading rubric can be found in resources.

 

This assignment may provide evidence of competency for Practice Behavior 2 (practice personal reflection and self-correction to assure continual professional development, Practice Behavior #7 (recognize and manage personal values in a way that allows professional values to guide practice), Practice Behavior #15 (gain sufficient-awareness to eliminate the influence of personal biases and values in working with diverse groups, Practice Behavior #10 (recognize and communicate their understanding of the importance of difference in shaping life experiences), and  Practice Behavior #18 (understand the forms and mechanisms of oppression and discrimination). As such, this assignment may be an appropriate product for inclusion in the ePortfolio for those or other practice behaviors.   

  1. 2.      Mid Term Paper:  Diversity and Social Justice

[EPAS 2.1.3, 2.1.4, and 2.1.5.]

The purpose of this paper is for each student to learn how to conduct an empirical review of the literature on a diverse population and critically reflect on issues related to such areas as (alienation, oppression, marginalization, discrimination, power/privilege, classism, sexism, and/or social and economic injustice). The population that you choose to research can be a topic covered in the readings, provided it is not a topic that your group was presenting on. Your paper will need to be 6 pages long, double-spaced. This does not include the title page or reference page. It will be organized according to below headings. I have attached a rubric at the end of the syllabus that illustrates how I will grade the paper.  Each student must complete the paper and turn in the rubric at the same time. The instructor will decide final grade of the paper. You will need to have the below headings in your paper. Please read carefully. Paper must be in adherence to APA guidelines.

Introduction

This section must provide a short description of the diverse population you are writing on. This section should illustrate why understanding this population is an important social justice issue. What inequalities do they experience? Incorporating some statistics will enhances the introduction of the paper so a reader can understand how many people are a part of this population in the United States, where are their highest populations, what are their demographic make-up generally etc.   

(1 Page)

History

In this section you will provide an historical examination of the population with a clear description of policies and laws that have attempted to address this population in the United States and/or laws and policies that have or still cause oppression and marginalization.

(2 Pages)

Diversity

In this section you will articulate on what you have learned about yourself by doing this paper and how it will affect your development and values as a professional helper, social justice and diversity advocate.

(2 Pages)

 

Recommendation

In this section you will recommend how the population you are writing about can be better assisted by service providers, social workers, nurses, and general service providers in a more culturally sensitive manner. State clearly how you can specifically advocate for human rights and social and economic justice for the population that you   researched.

(1 Page)

References

This section must include references to the text, one outside book, three website (only), and at least 4 journal articles. 

 

This assignment may provide evidence of competency for Practice Behavior #7 (recognize and manage personal values in a way that allows professional values to guide practice),  Practice Behavior #18 (understand the forms and mechanisms of oppression and discrimination),  Practice Behavior #10 (advocate for human rights and social and economic justice),  Practice Behavior #11 (distinguish, appraise, and integrate multiple sources of knowledge, including research-based knowledge, and practice wisdom) and Practice Behavior #25 (analyze, formulate, and advocate for policies that advance social well-being).   As such, this assignment may be an appropriate product for inclusion in the ePortfolio for those or other practice behaviors.   

 

  1. 3.      Current Events Controversial Forum Discussion

[EP 2.1.3 and 2.1.4]

 

Each topic week students will post an original link to a current event with discussion relevant to readings and respond to the post of 2 peers in OnCourse Forum function.  The current event will reflect the topic as assigned for the week.  Initial posts will be based on the DEAL Model and reflect professionalism.  Responses are expected to be professional and respectful as outlined by NASW Code of Ethics regarding professional conduct with colleagues.

This assignment provides evidence of competency for  Practice Behavior #2 (practice personal reflection and self-correction to assure continual professional development, Practice Behavior #7 (recognize and manage personal values in a way that allows professional values to guide practice), Practice Behavior #15 (gain sufficient-awareness to eliminate the influence of personal biases and values in working with diverse groups, Practice Behavior #10 (recognize and communicate their understanding of the importance of difference in shaping life experiences), and  Practice Behavior #18 (understand the forms and mechanisms of oppression and discrimination).

 

  1. 4.      Reading Reflections

[EPAS 2.1.3 and 2.1.4]

Each week students will post a unique perspective on one of the discussion questions and respond to the posts of 2 peers.  The discussion questions will directly reflect the assigned reading material.  Responses are expected to be professional and respectful as outlined by NASW Code of Ethics regarding professional conduct with colleagues.

This assignment provides evidence of competency for  Practice Behavior #2 (practice personal reflection and self-correction to assure continual professional development, Practice Behavior #7 (recognize and manage personal values in a way that allows professional values to guide practice), Practice Behavior #15 (gain sufficient-awareness to eliminate the influence of personal biases and values in working with diverse groups, Practice Behavior #10 (recognize and communicate their understanding of the importance of difference in shaping life experiences), and  Practice Behavior #18 (understand the forms and mechanisms of oppression and discrimination).

 

Evaluation and Grading

Group presentations                25%

Midterm Paper                        25%

Current Events                        25%

Reading Reflections               25%

 

Grading Scale

A          93%     Excellent, Exceptional Quality

A-         90%     Superior Quality

B+        87%     Very Good, Slightly Higher Quality

B          83%     Good, High Quality (expected of most BSW students)

B-         80%     Satisfactory Quality

C+        77%     Marginal, Modestly Acceptable Quality

C          73%     Marginal, Minimally Acceptable Quality

C-         70%     Unsatisfactory Quality

D+        67%     Unsatisfactory Quality

D          63%     Unsatisfactory Quality

D-        60%     Unsatisfactory Quality

F        <60%     Unsatisfactory Quality

Grades of C and C+ signify work that is marginal in nature.  The scholarly products or professional performances meet many but not all of the expected criteria.  Grades of C- and lower reflect work that is unsatisfactory.  The products or performances do not meet several, many, or most of the criteria.  The work fails to approach the standards of quality expected of a future BSW-level professional.

 The above schedule and procedures are subject to change in the event of extenuating circumstances.

University and School Policies

Studentsshould be familiar with the Indiana University Code of Student Rights, Responsibilities, and Conduct (http://www.iu.edu/~code/ ), from which many of the policies below are derived. In addition, students should refer to the MSW General Student Handbook and their respective campus supplements for more detailed information about these policies and additional resources available to them.

Cheating

Cheating is grounds for failing the course and possible dismissal from the program and/or university.

Cheating is considered to be any attempt to use or provide unauthorized assistance, materials, information, or study aids in any form and in any academic exercise or environment. A student must not use external assistance on any “in-class” or “take-home” examination, unless the instructor specifically has authorized external assistance. This prohibition includes, but is not limited to, the use of tutors, books, notes, calculators, computers, and wireless communication devices.

A student must not use another person as a substitute in the taking of an examination or quiz, nor allow other persons to conduct research or to prepare work, without advance authorization from the instructor to whom the work is being submitted.

A student must not use materials from a commercial term paper company; files of papers prepared by other persons, or submit documents found on the Internet. A student must not collaborate with other persons on a particular project and submit a copy of a written report that is represented explicitly or implicitly as the student’s individual work.

A student must not use any unauthorized assistance in a laboratory, at a computer terminal, or on fieldwork.

Plagiarism

Plagiarism is a form of cheating and is grounds for failing the course and possible dismissal from the program and/or university. Plagiarism is defined as presenting someone else’s work, including the work of other students, as one’s own. Any ideas or materials taken from another source for either written or oral use must be fully acknowledged, unless the information is common knowledge. What is considered “common knowledge” may differ from course to course.

A student must not adopt or reproduce ideas, opinions, theories, formulas, graphics, or pictures of another person without acknowledgment. A student must give credit to the originality of others and acknowledge indebtedness whenever:

  1. Directly quoting another person’s actual words, whether oral or written;
  2. Using another person’s ideas, opinions, or theories;
  3. Paraphrasing the words, ideas, opinions, or theories of others, whether oral or written;
  4. Borrowing facts, statistics, or illustrative material; or
    1. Offering materials assembled or collected by others in the form of projects or collections without acknowledgment.

The School of Social Work follows the Indiana University policy on plagiarism which states:

Plagiarism is defined on presenting someone else’s work, including the work of other students, as one’s own.  Any ideas or materials taken from another source for either written or oral use must be fully acknowledged, unless the information is common knowledge.  What is considered “common knowledge” may differ from course to course.

  1.  A student must not adopt or reproduce ideas, opinions, theories, formulas, graphics, or pictures of another person without acknowledgement.
  2. A student must give credit to the originality of others and acknowledge indebtedness whenever.
    1. Directly quoting another person’s actual words, whether oral or written;
    2. Using another person’s ideas, opinions, or theories;
    3. Paraphrasing the words, ideas, opinions, or theories of others whether oral or written;
    4. Borrowing facts, statistics, or illustrative material; or
    5. Offering materials assembled or collected by others in the form of projects or collections without acknowledgment.

 

Right to Accommodation for Individuals with Disabilities

Indiana University is committed to creating a learning environment and academic community that promotes educational opportunities for all individuals, including those with disabilities. Course directors are asked to make reasonable accommodations, upon request by the student or the university, for such disabilities. It is the responsibility of students with documented physical or learning disabilities seeking accommodation to notify their course directors and the relevant campus office that deals with such cases in a timely manner concerning the need for such accommodation. Indiana University will make reasonable accommodations for access to programs, services, and facilities as outlined by applicable state and federal laws.

Campus support offices:
Bloomington: Disability Services for Students www.indiana.edu/~iubdss
East: Student Support Services http://www.iue.edu/support/services.php

Fort Wayne (IPFW): Services for Students with Disabilities http://new.ipfw.edu/disabilities/

Indianapolis: Adaptive Educational Services http://aes.iupui.edu/

Northwest: Student Support Services www.iun.edu/ada_accessibility/

Southeast: Disability Services www.ius.edu/asc/disabilityservices/
South Bend: Office of Disabled Student Services https://www.iusb.edu/disability-support/

Class Participation and Observance of Religious Holidays

Any student who is unable to attend classes or participate in any examination, study, or work requirement on some particular day or days because of his or her religious beliefs must be given the opportunity to make up the work that was missed or to do alternative work that is intrinsically no more difficult than the original exam or assignment. Upon request and timely notice, students shall be provided a reasonable accommodation. It is recommended that dates and times for examinations and other major course obligations be announced at the beginning of the semester or summer session and that students let instructors know of conflicts very early in the semester, so that accommodations can be made.

Students seeking accommodation for religious observances must make a request in writing by the end of the 2nd week of the semester, or equivalent for non-semester length courses, to the course instructor and must use the Request for Course Accommodation Due to Religious Observance. In the case of religious holidays for which the date may change, the student should state the approximate date and when the exact date is known, inform the instructor of the exact date. The University will not levy fees or charges of any kind when allowing the student to make up missed work. In addition, no adverse or prejudicial effects should result to students because they have made use of these provisions.

Military Withdrawal

Indiana University realizes students who are members of the U.S. armed forces may be called to active duty, specialized training, or as part of disaster relief efforts with little notice. While the following policy does NOT pertain to initial active duty training (i.e. basic training), this policy is provided in order to minimize disruptions or inconveniences for students fulfilling their unanticipated U.S. military responsibilities in the midst of an academic term/session. For the complete policy information, go to http://veterans.iupui.edu/resources/withdrawal/

Grades of Incomplete

A grade of Incomplete (I) may be assigned by an instructor only when exceptional circumstances such as an illness, injury, or a family emergency prevents a student from finishing all the work required for the course.  The grade of Incomplete may be considered only when a substantial portion of the course work has already been completed, the coursework is of satisfactory quality, and no more than one major exam or assignment is outstanding. The student who does not meet these requirements should meet with her/his advisor to withdraw from the course(s) in question. The student should refer to the Registrar’s Office on her/his respective campus regarding the policies and deadline for automatic withdrawal for the semester in question.

The student is responsible for initiating the request for a grade of Incomplete.  If the instructor agrees, the instructor and student complete and sign a Record of Incomplete and Contract for Completion of Course Requirements form to ensure that a sound educational plan and time frame for completion of course requirements have been established.  Failure to fulfill the terms of this contract within the stipulated time frame may result in a failing grade.  For removal of a grade of Incomplete, the student is subject to the IUSSW policy, which has precedence over the University policy.  The student in the School of Social Work is expected to complete outstanding course work expeditiously, since many courses serve as prerequisites for others.  Generally, students may carry no more than one grade of Incomplete at any given time.  However, in cases of severe crisis, a student may work with her/his advisor to request grades of Incomplete in multiple courses.

Professional Conduct Policy

Students in a professional program are expected to conduct themselves as professionals in relation to the class and assignments.  Full participation is encouraged as long as it is appropriate to the course content.  Respect for the opinions of others is expected.  Frequent lateness or professionally unbecoming class conduct are likely to result in a lowered grade or deem a student unsuitable for field placement.  Students are evaluated on their personal and professional behavior or conduct in this class as described in the NASW Code of Ethics (http://www.socialworkers.org/pubs/code/default.asp). 

With the exception of legally prescribed medications, any use of consciousness altering substances before, during, or between class sessions obviously impairs learning and is unacceptable.

Evaluation of Course/Practicum

Consistent with the School and University policy, a formal evaluation of the course and its instructor will be completed at the end of the course. In the case of field practicum, watch for email notification at the end of the semester and complete the special evaluation of the field liaison, field instructor, and field agency using the link sent by the field coordinator.

Expectations for Writing

Effective practice of generalist social work requires excellent writing skills to communicate information accurately and concisely to others involved in helping client systems.  For this reason, formal writing assignments in social work courses will be evaluated both for the content and ideas presented as well as for the clarity of that presentation.  All formal papers will be typed, double-spaced and paginated.  In order to support professional expectations of utilizing evidence to inform practice at all levels, APA style is to be used to cite academic sources, including in-text references and bibliography.  The formal APA manual and other guides to writing in APA style are available in the bookstore and are an expected part of the textbooks for the BSW program. 

 

Campus Specific University Policies for IUNW

Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS)

During the semester, if you find that life stressors are interfering with your academic or personal success, consider contacting Counseling and Psychological Services. All IUSSW students are eligible for counseling services at minimal fees. Student Services also performs evaluations for learning disorders and ADHD; fees are charged for testing. Counseling and supportive services can be contacted by phone (219-980-6500). For more information, see iun.edu.

 

 

Bibliography

Banks, J.A., & Banks, C.A.M. (2001). Multicultural education: Issues and perspectives (4th ed.). New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Brotman, S., Ryan, B., Collins, S., Chamberland, L., Cormier, R., Julien, D., & Richard, B. (2007). Coming out to care: Caregivers of gay and lesbian seniors in Canada. Gerontologist, 47, 490-503.

Burk, N. M. (2007). Conceptualizing American Indian/Alaska Native college students’ classroom experiences: Negotiating cultural identity between faculty and students.  Journal of American Indian Education, 46(2), 1-18.

Cahill, S. (2007). The coming GLBT senior boom. The Gay & Lesbian Review, 14(7), 19-21.

Cone, A. A. (2000). Self-advocacy group advisor activities and their impact/relation to self advocacy group development. International Journal of Disability, Development and Education, 47(2) 137-154.

Christian, J. (2009). Examining the intersection of race, gender, and mass imprisonment. Journal of Ethnicity in Criminal Justice, 7(1), 69-84.

Fanon, F. (1968). Wretched of the Earth. New York: Grove Press.

Garcia, B., & VanSoest, D. (1999). Teaching about diversity and oppression: Learning from the analysis of critical classroom events. Journal of Teaching in Social Work, 18(1/2), 149-166.

Harrell, S. P. (2000). A multidimensional conceptualization of racism-related stress: Implications for the well-being of people of color. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 70(1), 42-57.

Hill-Collins, P. (2000). Black feminist thought: Knowledge, consequences, and the politics of empowerment (2nd ed.). New York: Routledge.

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