Indiana University Northwest
notice
Department Of English

Department Of English

Course Descriptions

ENG-G 205 : Introduction to the English Language

Acquaints the student with contemporary studies of the nature of language in general and of the English language in particular. Required of students preparing to teach English in secondary schools. Does not count toward group distribution requirements. (Fall or Spring)

ENG-G 207 : Grammar and Usage

Provides students with a foundation in traditional grammar and usage. Intended primarily for students preparing to teach English in secondary schools. Does not count toward group distribution requirements. (Fall, Spring, Summer I)

ENG-G 500 : Introduction to the English Language

An introduction to the English language: its nature, structure, and development. (Fall or Spring)

ENG-G 552 : Linguistics and the Teaching of English

Topics in applied English linguistics, intended for English teachers at all levels. (Occasionally)

ENG-L 101 : Western World Masterpieces I

Literary masterpieces from Homer to the Renaissance. (Fall, Spring, Summer I)

ENG-L 102 : Western World Masterpieces II

Literary masterpieces from the Renaissance to the present. (Fall, Spring, Summer I)

ENG-L 201 : Special Studies in Literature

Reading of literary works in relation to special themes. May be repeated once for credit with a change in topic. (Fall or Spring)

ENG-L 202 : Literary Interpretation

Development of critical skills essential to participation in the interpretation process. Through class discussion and focused writing assignments, introduces the premises and motives of literary analysis and critical methods associated with historical, generic, and / or cultural concerns. May be repeated once for credit by special arrangement with the Department of English. Note: Students planning to transfer to IU Bloomington should be aware that Advance College Project (ACP) ENG-L 202 will neither count toward the English major nor satisfy the intensive writing requirement at IU Bloomington. (Fall or Spring)

ENG-L 203 : Introduction to Drama

Representative groups of significant plays to acquaint students with characteristics of drama as a type of literature. (Fall or Spring)

ENG-L 204 : Introduction to Fiction

Representative works of fiction: stresses structural technique in the novel, theories and kinds of fiction, and thematic scope of the novel. (Fall or Spring)

ENG-L 205 : Introduction to Poetry

Kinds, conventions, and elements of poetry in a selection of poems from several historical periods. (Fall or Spring)

ENG-L 207 : Women and Literature

Critical issues and methods in the study of women writers and treatment of women in British and American literature. (Occasionally)

ENG-L 211 : English Literature to 1700

Representative selections with emphasis on major writers from Beowulf to 1700. (Fall or Spring)

ENG-L 212 : English Literature since 1700

Representative selections with emphasis on major writers from 1700 to the early twenty-first century. (Fall or Spring)

ENG-L 295 : American Film Culture

Film in relation to American culture and society. Topic varies. Works of literature may be used for comparison, but the main emphasis will be on film as a narrative medium and as an important element in American culture. (Occasionally)

ENG-L 305 : Chaucer

Chaucer's works with special emphasis on the Canterbury Tales. (Occasionally)

ENG-L 308 : Elizabethan Drama and Its Background

English drama from Middle Ages to 1642, including principal Elizabethan, Jacobean, and Caroline dramatists. (Occasionally)

ENG-L 311 : Studies in Renaissance Literature

Major Renaissance writers, with special attention to the poetry. (Occasionally)

ENG-L 315 : Major Plays of Shakespeare

A close reading of a representative selection of Shakespeare's major plays. (Fall or Spring)

ENG-L 326 : Major Authors of the Eighteenth Century

Representative selections from the works of writers such as Dryden, Swift, Pope, and Johnson. (Occasionally)

ENG-L 332 : Romantic Literature

Major Romantic writers, with emphasis on the following: Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats. (Fall or Spring)

ENG-L 335 : Victorian Literature

Major poetry and prose, 1839-1900, studied against the social and intellectual background of the period. (Fall or Spring)

ENG-L 345 : Twentieth - Century British Poetry

Modern poets, particularly Yeats, Eliot, and Auden; some later poets may be included. (Fall or Spring)

ENG-L 346 : Twentieth - Century British Fiction

Modern fiction, its techniques and experiments, particularly Joyce, Lawrence, and Woolf; some later novelists may be included. (Fall or Spring)

ENG-L 347 : British Fiction to 1800

Forms, techniques, and theories of fiction as exemplified by such authors as Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Smollett, and Sterne. (Occasionally)

ENG-L 348 : Nineteenth - Century British Fiction

Forms, techniques, and theories of fiction as exemplified by such romantic and Victorian authors as Scott, Dickens, Eliot, and Hardy. (Occasionally)

ENG-L 351 : American Literature 1800 - 1865

American writers to 1865: Emerson, Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman, and two or three additional major writers. (Fall or Spring)

ENG-L 352 : American Literature 1865 - 1914

American writers, 1865 - 1914: Mark Twain, Dickinson, James, and two or three additional major writers. (Fall or Spring)

ENG-L 354 : American Literature since 1914

American writers since 1914: Faulkner, Hemingway, Eliot, Frost, and two or three additional major writers. (Fall or Spring)

ENG-L 355 : American Fiction to 1900

Representative nineteenth - century American novels and short fiction. (Fall or Spring)

ENG-L 357 : Twentieth - Century American Poetry

American poetry since 1900, including such poets as Pound, Eliot, Frost, Stevens,Williams, and Lowell. (Fall or Spring)

ENG-L 358 : Twentieth - Century American Fiction

American fiction since 1900, including such writers as Dreiser, Lewis, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, and Bellow. (Fall or Spring)

ENG-L 364 : Native American Literature

A survey of traditional and modern literature by American Indians, especially of the high plains and Southwest culture areas, with particular attention to the image of the Indian. (Occasionally)

ENG-L 365 : Modern Drama: Continental

Special attention to such dramatists as Ibsen, Chekhov, Hauptmann, Pirandello, Brecht, and Sartre. (Occasionally)

ENG-L 366 : Modern Drama: English, Irish, and American

Special attention to such dramatists as Shaw, Synge, O'Neill, Hellman, Williams, Miller, and Albee. (Occasionally)

ENG-L 369 : Studies in British and American Authors

Studies in single authors (such as Wordsworth and Melville), groups of authors (such as the Pre-Raphaelites), and periods (such as American writers of the 1920s). Topics will vary from semester to semester. May be repeated once for credit. (Occasionally)

ENG-L 370 : Recent Black American Writing

A study of selected black American writers of the late-nineteenth and twentieth centuries with emphasis on very recent writing. The focus of this course will be on the literary qualities unique to those writers as individuals and as a group. Credit not given for both ENG-L 370 and AFRO-A 370. (Occasionally)

ENG-L 381 : Recent Writing

Study of selected writers of contemporary significance. May include relevant groups and movements (such as black writers, poets of projective verse, new regionalists, parajournalists and other experimenters in pop literature, folk writers, and distinctively ethnic writers); several recent novelists, poets, or critics; or any combination of groups. (Occasionally)

ENG-L 382 : Fiction of the Non-Western World

In-depth study of selected narratives from the fiction of the non-Western world. Focus and selections vary from year to year. (Occasionally)

ENG-L 390 : Children's Literature

Historical and modern children's books and selections from books, designed to assist future teachers, parents, librarians, or others in selecting the best of children's literature for each period of the child's life. (Fall, Spring, Summer I)

ENG-L 391 : Literature for Young Adults

Study of books suitable for junior high and high school classroom use. Special stress on works of fiction dealing with contemporary problems, but also including modern classics, biography, science fiction, and other areas of interest to teenage readers.

ENG-L 440 : Senior Seminar in English and American Literature

Thorough study of one or more major British and American writers or of a significant theme or form in English and American literature. (Fall)

ENG-L 495 : Individual Reading in English

May be repeated once for credit. (Occasionally)

ENG-L 553 : Studies in Literature

Especially for secondary school teachers of English. Critical evaluation of poems, short stories, a major novel, and some major plays. (Fall or Spring)

ENG-L 612 : Chaucer

Critical analysis of the Canterbury Tales, Troilus and Criseyde, and selected shorter poems. (Fall or Spring)

ENG-L 620 : Studies in English Literature 1500-1660

Intensive study of one writer, a group of writers, or a theme or form significant to the period. May be repeated once for credit. (Occasionally)

ENG-L 623 : English Drama from the 1590s to 1800, Exclusive of

(Occasionally)

ENG-L 625 : Shakespeare

Critical analysis of selected texts. (Fall or Spring)

ENG-L 631 : English Literature: 1660-1790

Extensive reading in poetry and nonfictional prose. (Occasionally)

ENG-L 639 : English Fiction to 1800

(Occasionally)

ENG-L 642 : Studies in Romantic Literature

Study of one writer, a group of writers, or a theme or form significant to the period. May be repeated once for credit. (Occasionally)

ENG-L 645 : English Fiction 1800-1900

(Occasionally)

ENG-L 647 : Studies in Victorian Literature

Study of one writer, a group of writers, or a theme or form significant to the period. May be repeated once for credit. (Fall or Spring)

ENG-L 649 : British Literature since 1900

Extensive reading in all genres. (Occasionally)

ENG-L 653 : American Literature, 1800-1900

Intensive historical and critical study of all genres from Washington Irving through Frank Norris. (Fall or Spring)

ENG-L 655 : American Literature since 1900

Intensive historical and critical study of all genres from Theodore Dreiser to the present. (Fall or Spring)

ENG-L 660 : Studies in British and American Literature, 1900 t

Intensive study of one writer, a group of writers, or a theme or form significant to the period. May be repeated once for credit. (Fall or Spring)

ENG-L 666 : Survey of Children's Literature

A survey of literature written for children and adolescents from the medieval period to the present. (Fall, Spring, Summer I)

ENG-L 670 : Continental Nineteenth Century Drama

Focuses on such major European dramatists of the 19th and 20th Centuries as Ibsen, Strindberg, Checkhov, Ionesco, and Beckett.  (Occasionally)

ENG-L 672 : Modern American Drama

(Occasionally)

ENG-W 130 : Principles of Composition

Placement according to IU Northwest English Placement Test. For students with significant writing problems who need an intensive, two-semester freshman writing experience. Practice in writing papers for a variety of purposes and audiences. Attention to revision and to sentence and paragraph structure. (Fall, Spring)

ENG-W 131 : Elementary Composition I

Offers instruction and practice in the reading and writing skills required in college. Emphasis is on written assignments that require synthesis, analysis, and argument based on sources. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)

ENG-W 132 : Elementary Composition II

Continuation of ENG-W 131, with emphasis on writing from secondary sources: research, evaluating evidence, and documentation. Does not count toward group distribution requirements. (Occasionally)

ENG-W 231 : Professional Writing Skills

To develop research and writing skills requisite for most academic and professional activities. Emphasis on methods of research, organization, and writing techniques useful in preparing reviews, critical bibliographies, research and technical reports, proposals, and papers. Junior or senior standing recommended. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)

ENG-W 233 : Intermediate Expository Writing

This course is a logical extension of the rhetorical and stylistic principles introduced in ENG-W 131. Emphasis is on the writing process, modes of discourse reflective of professional writing, and language conventions. Does not count toward group distribution requirements. (Occasionally)

ENG-W 301 : Writing Fiction

May be repeated once for credit. (Fall or Spring)

ENG-W 303 : Writing Poetry

May be repeated once for credit. (Fall or Spring)

ENG-W 311 : Non-fiction Creative Wrting

May be repeated once for credit. (Occasionally)

ENG-W 350 : Advanced Expository Writing

Close examination of assumptions, choices, and techniques that go into a student's own writing and the writing of others. Does not count toward group distribution requirements. (Occasionally)

ENG-W 398 : Internship in Writing

Combine study of writing with practical expertise in working with professionals in journalism, business communication, or technical writing. Researched reports are required. Evaluations made by both supervisor and instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. (Fall or Spring)

ENG-W 553 : Theory and Practice of Exposition

Especially for secondary school teachers of English. Writing analysis or exposition: resources of the writer's "voice," of logical structure, and of language as instrument. (Occasionally)

ENG-W 611 : Writing Fiction I

May be repeated once for credit. (Fall or Spring)

ENG-W 613 : Writing Poetry I

Writing poetry. May be repeated once for credit. (Fall or Spring)

JOUR-C 327 : Writing for Publication

A workshop for nonmajors to improve writing skills and learn basic requirements of writing for publication. Instruction in market analysis and interpreting specific editorial requirements, in gathering and researching background materials, and in preparing manuscripts. Examination of various types and styles of published writing. Will not count toward journalism major. (Occasionally)

JOUR-J 200 : Writing for Mass Media

Small working seminar relating communication theory to practice in journalistic writing. Emphasis on narration, exposition, description, and argumentation. Development of skills in conceptualization, organization, gathering evidence, and effective presentation of articles for publication in various mass media. (Occasionally)