Indiana University Northwest
notice
Department of Computer Information Systems

Department of Computer Information Systems

Informatics

Informatics Courses

INFO-I 101 : Introduction to Informatics

Emphasis on topics in human- computer interaction and human factors, collaborative technologies, group problem solving, ethics, privacy, and ownership of information and information sources, information representation, and the information life cycle. (Fall, Spring)

INFO-I 201 : Mathematical Foundations of Informatics

An introduction to the suite of mathematical and logical tools used in information sciences, including finite mathematics, automata and computability theory, elementary probability, and statistics and basics of classical information theory. (Spring)

INFO-I 202 : Social Informatics

Introduces the social and behavioral foundations of informatics. Theoretical approaches to how technology is used from psychological and sociotechnical perspectives. Examples of how current and emerging technologies such as games, e-mail, and electronic commerce are affecting daily lives, social relations, work, and leisure time. (Spring)

INFO-I 210 : Information Infrastructure I

The software architecture of information systems. Basic concepts of systems and applications programming. Credit cannot be given for both INFO-I 210 and CSCI-C 201 or CSCI-A 201 except by permission. (Fall)

INFO-I 211 : Information Infrastructure II

The systems architecture of distributed applications. Advanced programming, including an introduction to the programming of graphical systems.  Credit cannot be given for both INFO-I 211 and CSCI-C 307 or CSCI-A 302 except by permission. (Spring)

INFO-I 300 : Human-Computer Interaction

The analysis of human factors and the design of computer application interfaces. A survey of current best practice with an eye toward what future technologies will allow. (Spring)

INFO-I 303 : Organizational Informatics

Examines the various needs, uses, and consequences of information in organizational contexts. Topics include organizational types and characteristics, functional areas and business processes, information-based products and services, the use of and redefining role of information technology, the changing character of work life and organizational practices, sociotechnical structures and the rise and transformation of information-based industries.

INFO-I 308 : Information Representation

The basic structure of information representation in social and scientific applications. Representational structures and approaches from many disciplines are introduced; philosophical theories of classification and categorization; information access and representation on the World Wide Web; object-oriented design and relational databases; AI knowledge representation and discovery. (Spring)

INFO-I 310 : Multimedia Arts and Technology

The study of the evolution of media arts and underlying principles of communication. Application development paradigms in current practice. (Fall)

INFO-I 320 : Distributed Systems and Collaborative Computing

An introductory treatment of distributed systems and programming. Topics range from the distributed and object models of computation to advanced concepts, such as remote method invocations, object brokers, object services, open systems, and future trends for distributed information systems. (Once a year)

INFO-I 400 : Topics in Informatics

Content will vary with topic. Topics will include current trends in Informatics, Bioinformatics, and Health Informatics (Fall, Spring and Summer)

INFO-I 402 : Informatics Project Management

This course will focus on project management in an informatics setting. Students will become conversant in the tools and techniques of project management, such as project selection methods, work breakdown structures, network diagrams, critical path analysis, critical chain scheduling, cost estimates, earned value management, motivation theory, and team building (Fall)

INFO-I 420 : Internship in Informatics Professional Practice

Students gain professional work experience in an industry or research organization setting, using skills and knowledge acquired in informatics course work. (Fall, Spring)

INFO-I 421 : Applications of Data Mining

This course explores the use of data mining techniques in different settings, including business and scientific domains.  The emphasis will be on using techniques, instead of developing new techniques or algorithms.  Students will select, prepare, visualize, analyze, and present data that leads to the discovery of novel and usable information. (Alternate years)

INFO-I 492 : Senior Thesis I

The senior student prepares and presents a thesis: a substantial, typically multichapter paper based on a well-planned research or scholarly project, as determined by the student and a sponsoring faculty member.

INFO-I 493 : Senior Thesis II

The senior student prepares and presents a thesis: a substantial typically multichapter paper based on a well-planned research or scholarly project, as determined by the student and a sponsoring faculty member. (Spring)

INFO-I 494 : Design and Development of an Information System I

System design and development present both technical and managerial problems with which students will be familiar from their undergraduate course work. This course puts these lessons into practice as students work in teams to develop an information system. Examples of course projects include design and development of a database for a business or academic application, preparation and presentation of an interactive media performance or exhibit, or design and implementation of a stimulated environment (virtual presentation of an interactive media performance or exhibit, or design and implementation of a simulated environment (virtual reality). (Fall)

INFO-I 494 : Capstone Project Internship I

Students put their informatics education to practice through the development of a substantial project while working in a professional information technology environment (Fall, Spring and Summer)

INFO-I 495 : Design and Development of an Information System II

System design and development present both technical and managerial problems with which students will be familiar from their undergraduate course work. This course puts these lessons into practice as students work in teams to develop an information system. Examples of course projects include design and development of a database for a business or academic application, preparation and presentation of an interactive media performance or exhibit, or design and implementation of a simulated environment (virtual reality). (Spring)

INFO-N 215 : Online Document Development

Study of the creation, publication and management of documents, images, and other media types on the Web. Topics include Web publishing, asset preparation, document types, contemporary content management systems and their use in the organization. Hands-on experience with contemporary systems for content management. (Fall, Spring and Summer)