College of Arts and Sciences

Departments

History, Philosophy, Political Science, and Religious Studies
History
Courses in History

Note: Where courses are marked "I-II," the student need not have taken "I" to register for "II."

The subject matter for the topics courses (HIST-H 225­ - HIST-T 425 / HIST-T 426) in any semester will be indicated in the Schedule of Classes published for registration.

The Latino Studies Program offers courses that may be cross-listed with HIST-A 352, HIST-A 391, HIST-A 392, HIST-A 446, HIST-F 301, and HIST-F 444. See Department of Minority Studies.

  • HIST-A 301 Colonial and Revolutionary America I (3 cr.) Possible themes for this course include the development of British North America, the colonial origins of the revolutionary struggle in America, and an exploration of the American Revolutionary era, 1765 to 1789. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-A 303 The United States, 1789-1865 (3 cr.) This course will examine the early American republic, beginning with the Constitutional Convention and ending with the conclusion of the Mexican-American War. Topics that will be explored include the early development of the American government, the rise of partisanship and democracy, social and economic developments, slavery, and westward expansion. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-A 313 Origins of Modern America, 1865-1917 (3 cr.) Social, economic, cultural, and political ways in which Americans accommodated and resisted changes introduced by large-scale industrialization. Populism and progressivism receive special attention. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-A 314 United States, 1917-1945 (3 cr.) Political, demographic, economic, and intellectual transformation during World War I, the twentieis, the Great Depression, and World War II. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-A 315 Recent U.S. History (3 cr.) Political, demographic, economic, and intellectual transformation after World War II, with special emphasis on the 1950s. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-A 346 American Diplomatic History (3 cr.) Foundations and evolution of American foreign policy with particular emphasis on the role of the United States as a world power in the twentieth centure. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-A 348 Civil War and Reconstruction (3 cr.) Crisis of the Union; social, political, economic, and cultural factors leading to war and their influence in the war. Reconstruction and its consequences in the South and in the nation. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-A 352 History of Latinos in the United States (3 cr.) Latino experience in the United States; economic and social factors of the Latino role in a non-Latino nation.  (may be cross-listed with CHRI-C 352) (Fall)
  • HIST-A 355 Afro-American History I (3 cr.) History of blacks in the United States. Slavery, abolitionism. Reconstruction, post-Reconstruction to 1900. (may be cross-listed with AFRO-A 355) (Fall)
  • HIST-A 356 Afro-American History II (3 cr.) History of blacks in the United States from 1900 to present. Migration north, NAACP, Harlem Renaissance, postwar freedom movement. (may be cross-listed with AFRO-A 356) (Spring)
  • HIST-A 363 Survey of Indiana History (3 cr.) A survey of Indiana history and culture from the original inhabitants to recent times, with emphasis on the growth of a distinctive Hoosier culture. (Fall and Spring)
  • HIST-A 369 Issues in Early United States History (3 cr.) Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems in United States history to 1870. Topics will vary. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-A 382 The Sixties (3 cr.) An intensive examination of the decade that tore apart post-World War II American society, beginning with the confident liberalism that believed the nation could "pay any price" and "bear any burden" in order to stop communism abroad and to promote reform at home, focusing on the internal contradictions and external challenges that destroyed this liberal agenda (civil rights and black power, the New Left, the counterculture, second-wave feminism, the sexual revolution, the Vietnam War, and the globalization of the economy), and finishing with the more conservative order that emerged in the early 1970s to deal with the conflicting realities of limited national power and wealth on the one hand, and rising demands for rights and opportunities on the other. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-A 391 History of Chicanos and Puerto Ricans in the U.S. I (3 cr.) Analysis of the historical experiences of Chicanos and Puerto Ricans in American society from colonial times to 1900. Focuses on original Spanish settlements; colonial and Mexican societies; Mexican-American War; processes of subordination and proletarianization; development of Mexican culture in the United States; and the Spanish-American War.  ( may be cross-listed with CHRI-C 391) (Occasionally)
  • HIST-A 392 History of Chicanos and Puerto Ricans in the U.S. II (3 cr.) Analysis of the historical experiences of Chicanos and Puerto Ricans in American society from 1900 to present. Focuses on issues of immigration and migration; continued subordination; social and cultural adaptation; and political protest and organization.  (may be cross-listed with CHRI-C 392) (Occasionally)
  • HIST-A 446 Mexican and Puerto Rican Immigration and Migration (3 cr.) Study of the migration of Mexicans and Puerto Ricans to the United States. Emphasis will be on push-pull factors of migration, the incorporation of both groups into the American socioeconomic structure, the role of federal legislation in patterns of migration, and the special plight of undocumented workers. (may be cross-listed with CHRI-C 446) (Occasionally)
  • HIST-B 200 Issues in Western European History (3 cr.) Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems across more than one period of Western European history. Topics vary but usually cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-B 300 Issues in Western European History (3 cr.) Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems across more than one period of Western European history.  Topics vary, but usually cut across fields, regions, and periods.  May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-B 304 Postwar European Youth (3 cr.) In the period following the Second World War European society was rapidly remade, granting greater social, cultural, and economic autonomy to young people.  Young people in Britain, France, the Germanys, and the Soviet Union created new identities for themselves that illustrated the convergence of culture and politics.  This course explores the experiences of young people in the postwar era to gauge the broader transformations in contemporary European life. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-B 351 Western Europe in the Early Middle Ages (3 cr.) Evolution of European civilization from the fall of Rome, development of Christianity, and the Germanic invasions through Charlemagne's Empire and the subsequent development of feudalism, manorialism, papacy, and Romanesque architecture. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-B 356 French Revolution and Napoleon (3 cr.) Crisis of the Old Regime; middle class and popular revolt; constitutional monarchy to Jacobin commonwealth; the Terror and revolutionary government; expansion of Revolution in Europe; rise and fall of the Napoleonic Empire. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-B 357 Modern France (3 cr.) A social, political, and cultural survey of France in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-B 359 Europe from Napoleon to the First World War (3 cr.) Vienna settlement and period of reaction in Europe; liberalism and nationalism; revolutions; industrial revolution; capitalism; socialist movements; unification of Italy and Germany; clericalism and anticlericalism; struggles for political democracy; social legislation; imperialism, nationalist rivalries, and background of World War I. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-B 361 Europe in the Twentieth Century I (3 cr.) Diplomatic, economic, intellectual, military, political, and social developments within Europe from World War I to present; changing relationships between Europe and other parts of the world. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-B 391 Themes in World History (3 cr.) Contemporary bibliography and interpretations of major problems in world history. (Fall and Spring)
  • HIST-C 300 Issues in Classical and Byzantine History (3 cr.) Study and analysis of the history of Greece or Rome, the history of Late Antiquity in the Greco-Roman world, or of the Byzantine Empire.  Topics will vary in focus, region, and period.  May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-C 386 Greek History (3 cr.) Political, social, and economic developments in Greek world from age of Mycenae and Troy until Roman conquest (167 B.C.). Greek colonial world, Athens, and Sparta, career and legend of Alexander the Great, the Hellenistic Age. Archaeology as a source for political and social history. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-C 388 Roman History (3 cr.) History of Roman people, from legendary origins to death of Justinian (A.D. 565), illustrating development from city-state to world empire. Evolutionary stages exemplify transition from early kingship to republican forums, finally replaced by monarchy of distinctively Roman type. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-D 310 Russian Revolutions and the Soviet Regime (3 cr.) Russia on the eve of World War I; revolutions that have swept Russia; principal developments in government, economy, cultural and social life, and international policy under the Communist regime; expansion of Russian and Communist power, particularly since 1945. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-F 301 History of Puerto Rico (3 cr.) Colonization by Spain; international development; Spanish-American War; occupation by United States; economic, social, and political development; migration to the mainland; debate on independence, autonomy, and statehood.  (may be cross-listed with CHRI-C 301) (Occasionally)
  • HIST-F 444 History of Mexico (3 cr.) Brief survey of the colonial period and independence movement. Ideological conflicts within the republic. Revolution of 1910. Relation with United States from Mexican viewpoint.  (may be cross-listed with CHRI-C 444) (Occasionally)
  • HIST-G 200 Issues in Asian History (3 cr.) Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import.  Topics vary from semester to semester but usually are broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods.  May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (Fall and Spring)
  • HIST-G 369 Modern Japan (3 cr.) Western impact and social and intellectual change in late Tokugawa Japan from about 1720. The Meiji Restoration. State capitalism and the Japanese development process. Empire, war defeat, U.S. occupation, and renewal in the twentieth century. Japan's rise to the front rank of world economic powers after World War II. (Fall and Spring)
  • HIST-G 385 Modern China (3 cr.) A survey of the final century of dynastic rule and the rise to power of the Nationalist and Communist parties, highlighting social and cultural developments, the impact of Western imperialism, and the evolution of revolutionary ideologies. (Fall and Spring)
  • HIST-G 387 Contemporary China (3 cr.) A survey of recent Chinese history focusing on social, cultural, and political life in the People's Republic of China and post-1949 Taiwan. Events covered include the Long March, the Cultural Revolution, and the Tiananmen Square Protests of 1989. (Fall and Spring)
  • HIST-H 105 American History I (3 cr.) Colonial period, Revolution, Confederation and Constitution. National period to 1865. Political history forms the framework, with economic, social, cultural, and intellectual history interwoven. Introduction to historical literature, source material, and criticism. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
  • HIST-H 106 American History II (3 cr.) 1865 to present. Political history forms the framework, with economic, social, cultural, and intellectual history interwoven. Introduction to historical literature, source material, and criticism. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
  • HIST-H 113 History of Western Civilization I (3 cr.) Rise and fall of ancient civilizations; barbarian invasions; rise, flowering, and disruption of medieval Church; feudalism; national monarchies; rise of middle class; parliamentary institutions; liberalism; political democracy; industrial revolution; capitalism and socialist movements; nationalism, imperialism, and international rivalries; wars. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
  • HIST-H 114 History of Western Civilization II (3 cr.) Rise and fall of ancient civilizations; barbarian invasions; rise, flowering, and disruption of medieval Church; feudalism; national monarchies; rise of middle class; parliamentary institutions; liberalism; political democracy; industrial revolution; capitalism and socialist movements; nationalism, imperialism, and international rivalries; wars. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
  • HIST-H 207 Modern East Asian Civilization (3 cr.) Contrasting patterns of indigenous change and response to Western imperialism in East Asia during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. China and Japan receive primary consideration. Emphasis on the rise of nationalism and other movements directed toward revolutionary change. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-H 215 Proseminar in History (3 cr.) P: Freshmen and sophomores with consent of instructor. Selected topics of history. May be taken three times. (Spring)
  • HIST-H 219 Origins and History of the Second World War (3 cr.) Nazi and fascist aggression, collective security, appeasement and outbreak of war in Europe. German blitzkrieg; Russian front; North African, Italian, and Normandy campaigns; Hitler's racial policies; Japanese-American hostility; Pearl Harbor; island hopping; the atomic bomb. Roosevelt, Stalin, and Churchill at Teheran, Yalta, and Potsdam. War-crime trials. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-H 220 American Military History (3 cr.) From settlement of colonies to present. European background, colonial militia, Indian fighting. Principal foreign wars and their strategic objectives. Technological changes and effect of military on American society. Army is emphasized, with some attention to Navy, Marines, and Air Force. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-H 225 Special Topics in History (3 cr.) Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics will vary from semester to semester, but will usually be broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated once for credit. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-H 228 The Vietnam War (3 cr.) Indochinese history; French colonialism; Cold War dynamics; U.S. military-political actions; domestic U.S. politics; U.S. disengagement; Indochinese and American legacies. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-H 232 The World in the Twentieth Century (3 cr.) Shaping of the contemporary world, with emphasis on the interaction of the West, particularly Western imperialism and Western political and social ideas, with non-Western lands. Examination of revolutionary, national, ideological, social, and/or religious movements in Japan, China, India, Mexico, Russia, the Middle East, Southeast Asia, Africa. Today's political, social, and economic institutions. (Fall and Spring)
  • HIST-H 425 Topics in History (3 cr.) Intensive study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope from the perspective of arts and humanities. Topics will vary but will ordinarily cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated for credit. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-H 495 Undergraduate Readings in History (1-12 cr.) P: At least junior standing and 12 credit hours of related course work. Prior arrangement with individual faculty member. Faculty-supervised experience in museum work, historic preservation, historical societies, oral history, or other history- related fieldwork in private and public institutions. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-J 485 Historiography (3 cr.) Principles, methodology, and practice of historical study, with emphasis on the varieties of history, the writing of history, and historical literature. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-J 495 Proseminar for History Majors (3 cr.) Selected topics of history. May be taken three times. (Fall, Spring)
  • HIST-K 493 Reading for Honors (12 cr.) P: Approval of departmental honors committee. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-K 499 Senior Honors Thesis (3 cr.) Senior-level course for honors students only. Training in research and writing, culminating in honors thesis to be written under direction of faculty member. Oral examination over thesis conducted by three faculty members. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-T 325 Topics in History (3 cr.) Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope from perspective of the arts and humanities.  Topics will vary, but will usually cut across fields, regions, and periods.  May be repeated with a different topic. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-T 425 Topics in History (3 cr.) Intensive study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope from the perspective of arts and humanities. Topics will vary, but will ordinarily cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated for credit. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-G 315 History and Memory of Modern China and Japan (3 cr.) This class surveys the history and memory revolving around the war between China and Japan (1937-45), which was part of the Pacific phase of World War II. By focusing on how the Sino-Japanese War, and especially the Nanjing (Nanking) Massacre has been remembered in both China and Japan, this course explores the relationship between memory, politics, culture, and society in the formation of history and memory in modern China and Japan. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-G 410 China, Japan and the U.S. in the 20th and 21st Centuries (3 cr.) This course discusses the relationship between China, Japan, and the U.S. in the 20th and 21st centuries.  We study the mutual perceptions and interactions of the three countires over the 20th Century, and examine how the perceptions and memoires of these interactions impact their relationships in the 21st Century.  (Every other year)
  • HIST-B 346 The Crusades (3 cr.) Christian military expeditions authorized by the popes between 1095 and 1500.  An exploration of the concept of holy war, the military campaigns, the crusades ideal, the crusaders motivations, women's involvement, life in the crusader states, cultural exchanges between Muslims, Christians, and Jews, and the modern legacy of the crusades.(Occasionally)

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