College of Arts and Sciences

Courses

Undergraduate
Afro-American Studies (AFRO)
  • AFRO-A 101 Contemporary Minority Political Problems (3 cr.) Introductory study of the contemporary political problems of the Afro-American. Attention will be given to immediate as well as long-range alternative solutions. (Fall)
  • AFRO-A 103 Introduction to Urban Studies (3 cr.) A survey course designed to expose students to the social, economic, and political issues that affect America's urban communities. (Spring)
  • AFRO-A 150 Survey of the Culture of Black Americans (3 cr.) The culture of black people in America viewed from a broad interdisciplinary approach, employing resources from history, literature, folklore, religion, sociology, and political science. (Fall, Summer I)
  • AFRO-A 151 Minority People in the United States (3 cr.) A study of the cultural experiences of minority people in the United States. Focus will be on African Americans and Latinos. Other minority groups will be studied where appropriate. The course will be interdisciplinary with heavy emphasis on original texts. Credit cannot be earned for both AFRO-A 151 and CHRI-C 151. (Spring)
  • AFRO-A 169 Introduction to Afro-American Literature (3 cr.) Representative Afro-American writings, including poetry, short stories, sermons, novels, and drama. (Fall)
  • AFRO-A 204 Topics in Afro-American Studies (3 cr.) Analysis of selected topics and contemporary issues relating to the Afro-American experience. (Fall, Spring)
  • AFRO-A 206 The Urban Community (3 cr.) An examination of the urban community in general, with a focus on the African-American community from an asset perspective. Focus on uneven development and how race and class have formed the basis for the inequalities among urban communities. (Fall)
  • AFRO-A 208 The African Caribbean (3 cr.) Introductory examination to issues concerning Africans in the Caribbean from a historical, cultural, social, and political perspective. Themes discussed include: the system of plantation slavery, the Haitian revolution, de-colonization, Pan-Africanism, class conflicts, neo-colonialism, struggles for national identity, and the impact of race, color, gender, music, and religion on regional distinctiveness.
  • AFRO-A 210 Black Women in the Diaspora (3 cr.) Interdisciplinary examination of salient aspects of black women's history, identity, and experience, including policies, cultural assumptions, and knowledge systems that affect black women's lives. While the primary focus will be North America, the lives of black women in other cultural settings within the African diaspora will also be examined. (Fall)
  • AFRO-A 230 Contemporary Urban Affairs and the African American Experience (3 cr.) An examination of contemporary urban affairs and the socioeconomic and cultural experiences of the African-American male. Focus on social and economic change and how these changes affect communities in general, the African-American community, the family, and particularly the role and status of the African American male. (Fall)
  • AFRO-A 240 Social Welfare and Minorities (3 cr.) P: AFRO-A 103 Review and study of the factual information regarding the welfare system as it is currently administered. Emphasis on the interface between minority welfare recipients and the welfare system. (Spring)
  • AFRO-A 249 Afro-American Autobiography (3 cr.) A survey of autobiographies written by black Americans in the last two centuries. The course emphasizes how the autobiographers combine the grace of art and the power of argument to urge the creation of genuine freedom in America. (Occasionally)
  • AFRO-A 250 U.S. Contemporary Minorities (3 cr.) R: AFRO-A 151 or CHRI-C 151 An interdisciplinary study of how members of four minority groups - Asian Americans, African Americans, Latinos and Native Americans - combine their struggle for social justice with their desire to maintain their own concepts and identity. (Fall - Occasionally)
  • AFRO-A 255 The Black Church in America (3 cr.) History of the black church from slavery to the present emphasis on the church's role as a black social institution, its religious attitudes as expressed in songs and sermons, and its political activities as exemplified in the minister-politician. (Fall)
  • AFRO-A 260 Contemporary Minority Problems (3 cr.) A seminar, primarily designed for sophomores and juniors, directed to critical analysis of selected topics germane to the future socioeconomic and political position of Afro-Americans. (Spring)
  • AFRO-A 261 The Black Family (3 cr.) P: 6 credit hours in sociology An analysis of the historical background of the black family. The contemporary social forces that affect the black family are examined, along with strategies for social reform. (Fall)
  • AFRO-A 280 Racism and Law (3 cr.) Contemporary racial problems in American society with regard to law and constitutional principles of basic freedom and associated conflict. The effects of societal norms and the impact of racism. (Occasionally)
  • AFRO-A 282 The Black Community, Law, and Social Change (3 cr.) A study of the black community with emphasis on law and social change. (Spring)
  • AFRO-A 290 Sociocultural Perspective of Afro- American Music (3 cr.) Survey of cultural, social, and political attitudes that influenced blacks in the development and participation in blues, jazz, urban black popular music, and "classical" music. (Spring)
  • AFRO-A 301 Community Planning and Development (3 cr.) P: AFRO-A 103 or consent of instructor Overview of the planning process and its impact on urban minority communities. Topics include socioeconomic studies, land use planning, and urban development strategies. (Spring)
  • AFRO-A 302 Strategies of Community Organizations (3 cr.) P: AFRO-A 240 or consent of instructor Examination of several communities and the various theories and strategies developed for community organizations. (Fall)
  • AFRO-A 304 Housing and the Minority Community (3 cr.) P: AFRO-A 301, SPEA-V 365, or consent of instructor An examination of contemporary issues in housing, urban development, and the provision of public services as they affect minority communities. Topics include gentrification, exclusionary zoning, housing assistance, disinvestment, and economic development. (Occasionally)
  • AFRO-A 333 Africans and Cultural Minorities in International Film (3 cr.) Introduction to cinema from French-speaking Africa, the Caribbean and Europe involving enthnocultural minority groups from an interdisciplinary approach. Course topics covered will explore issues surrounding colonialism and its aftermath, multiculturalism, expressions of national identity, interracial relations, gender, class, and the social position of enthnocultural minority groups from a world view.
  • AFRO-A 341 Poverty in America (3 cr.) Intensive comparative analysis of the way of life of America's urban poor and their relationship to the larger society. (Fall)
  • AFRO-A 343 Practicum in Urban Studies (3 cr.) P: AFRO-A 301 or AFRO-A 302 or consent of instructor Designed to enhance the student's practical, working knowledge of the social, economic, and political dynamics affecting the urban community. Field placement will be facilitated within three areas of professional endeavor: social services, local government, and community development and planning. Does not count toward fulfillment of College of Arts and Sciences Group III distribution requirements. (Spring)
  • AFRO-A 355 Afro-American History I (3 cr.) History of blacks in the United States. Slavery, abolitionism, Reconstruction, post-Reconstruction to 1900. Cross-listed with HIST A355. (Fall)
  • AFRO-A 356 Afro-American History II (3 cr.) History of blacks in the United States from 1900 to present. Migration north, NAACP, Harlem Renaissance, postwar freedom movement. Cross-listed with  HIST A356. (Spring)
  • AFRO-A 370 Recent Black American Writing (3 cr.) A study of selected black American writers of the late- nineteenth and twentieth centuries with emphasis on very recent writing. The focus of this course will be on the literary qualities unique to those writers as individuals and as a group. Credit not given for both AFRO-A 370 and ENG-L 370. (Spring - Occasionally)
  • AFRO-A 379 Early Black American Writing (3 cr.) Afro-American writing before World War II with emphasis on critical reactions and analyses. Includes slave narratives, autobiographies, rhetoric, fiction, and poetry. (Spring—Occasionally)
  • AFRO-A 380 Contemporary Black American Writing (3 cr.) The black experience in America as it has been reflected since World War II in the works of outstanding Afro-American writers: fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama. (Spring—Occasionally)
  • AFRO-A 384 Blacks in American Drama and Theatre, 1945–Present (3 cr.) Images of Blacks as reflected in American drama from 1945 to present. Emphasis on the contributions of Black playwrights such as Lorraine Hansberry, Langston Hughes, Imamu Amiri Baraka (LeRoi Jones), Ted Shin, and Ed Bullins
  • AFRO-A 392 Afro-American Folklore (3 cr.) Afro- American culture in the United States viewed in terms of history (antebellum to present) and social change (rural to urban). Use of oral traditions and life histories to explore aspects of black culture and history. Credit not given for both AFRO-A 392 and Folklore-F 394. (Fall—Occasionally)
  • AFRO-A 398 Introduction to Black Studies Research (3 cr.) An introduction to historical sociological methods of research and experimental design with emphasis on the application of those methods to the black community. The appropriate quantitative methods and their computation are also used for each research approach. (Occasionally)
  • AFRO-A 401 Minorities, Politics, and Social Change (3 cr.) Topical study of the struggle of black Americans to obtain representative political power. Redistricting and gerrymandering, independent candidates and new political alternatives, the impact of the 18-year-old vote on black political activity, black quasi-political organi­zations, black power in the U.S. Congress. (Spring)
  • AFRO-A 404 Topics in Afro-American Studies (3 cr.) P: consent of instructor Extensive analysis of selected topics and contemporary issues relating to the Afro- American experience. Topics vary from semester to semester. May be repeated once for a different topic with a maximum of two courses or 6 credit hours. (Fall, Spring)
  • AFRO-A 406 Literature by American Women of Color (3 cr.) This course explores the literature of Native American, African American, Asian American, and Latina writers. These works as art define and theorize the experience of minority women in the United States. Critical and artistic issues are examined in light of their sociohistorical context. (Fall)
  • AFRO-A 410 The Black Woman and the Afro- American Experience (3 cr.) Historical examination of the black woman in America—from the African past to the present—in relationship to her position in the family and in society. Analysis of the social science paradigm, which creates and perpetuates stereotypes of black women. (Spring)
  • AFRO-A 440 History of the Education of Black Americans (3 cr.) Education of black Americans and its relationship to the Afro-American experience. Trends and patterns in the education of black Americans as such relate to the notions of education for whom and for what. (Occasionally)
  • AFRO-A 488 Community Experience Internship (3 cr.) P: AFRO-A 398 and AFRO-A 498 or departmental consent Field placement for majors in Afro-American studies. Work with an agency or organization that deals primarily with inner-city minority groups under joint supervision of agency and departmental staff members. Does not count toward fulfillment of College of Arts and Sciences Group III distribution requirements. (Fall, Spring, Summer I)
Anthropology (ANTH)
  • ANTH-A 104 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3 cr.) A survey of cultural and social processes that influence human behavior, using comparitive examples from different ethnic groups around the world, with the goal of better understanding the broad range of human behavioral potenials and those influences that shape the different expressions of these potentials. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
  • ANTH-A 105 Human Origins and Prehistory (3 cr.) Human biological evolution and prehistory from the earliest archaeological record through the rise of civilization. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
  • ANTH-A 200 Topics in Anthropology (topic varies) (3 cr.) P: ANTH A104. Course is geared to the nonmajor and emphasizes the development of skills in the use of anthropological approaches to the study of human behavior and belief. Topics will vary. ANTH A200 may be taken twice with different topics. (Occasionally)
  • ANTH-A 210 Ancillary Topics in Anthropology (.5-2 cr.) Individual and group activities that may be independent of or connected to a course. May include activities such as discussions, fieldwork, service learning, and applied anthropology projects. May be repeated with different topics to total up to 3 credit hours. (Occasionally)
  • ANTH-A 220 Hands-on Fossil Observations (1 cr.) Hands-on observations, measurements, and interpre­tations of human fossils and fossil casts; offered in conjunction with human paleontology courses. (Occasionally)
  • ANTH-A 230 Linguistic Anthropology Lab (1 cr.) Linguistics problems, word games, and videos. Offered in conjunction with Language and Culture courses. (Occasionally)
  • ANTH-A 240 History of Ethnographic Film (1 cr.) Viewing of ethnographic films from earliest to most recent, with discussions. Offered in conjunction with theory courses. May be repeated once with different topic and with different theory course.
  • ANTH-A 360 Development of Anthropological Thought (3 cr.) P: two courses in Anthropology, including ANTH A104, A105, and E200. An overview of the major theoretical developments within anthropology as the discipline has attempted to produce a universal and unified view of human life based on knowledge of evolution and prehistoric and contemporary cultures. (Spring—even years)
  • ANTH-A 495 Independent Studies in Anthropology (1-4 cr.) P: Two courses in anthropology and authorization of the instructor. A supervised, in-depth examination through individual research on a particular topic selected and conducted by the student in consultation with an anthropology faculty member. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
  • ANTH-B 201 Bioanthropology and Forensics Lab (3 cr.) C: ANTH B300. Laboratory exercises in anatomy, genetics, primates, fossils; and identification, aging, and sexing of the human skeleton. (Occasionally)
  • ANTH-B 206 Primate Zoo Observation (1 cr.) P: Any one of ANTH A103, ANTH A105, ANTH B200, ANTH B266, or ANTH B466. Observation of primate anatomy, locomotion, and social behavior at various Midwestern zoos. (Occasionally)
  • ANTH-B 250 Topics in Biological Anthropology (3 cr.) P: ANTH A105, or one course in biology or anatomy. Selected topics in bioanthropology. May be repeated once with a different topic. (Occasionally)
  • ANTH-B 300 Bioanthropology (3 cr.) P: ANTH A103, ANTH A105, or one semester of college biology. Bioanthropology of humans, basic biological principles, functional morphology, evolutionary history. Human evolution from lower forms, environmental factors, speciation and differentiation, growth, sexual differences, constitutional variability. (Fall - odd years)
  • ANTH-B 368 The Evolution of Primate Social Behavior (3 cr.) Major patterns of social organization in the order Primates, with focus on several important primate species. Examination of Darwinian theories of behavioral evolution. Particular attention paid to the influence of food-getting and diet on social behavior.
  • ANTH-B 400 Undergraduate Seminar (3 cr.) P: ANTH A105 and junior standing, or three courses in biology or anatomy. Selected topics in bioanthropology. Analysis of research. Development of skills in analysis and criticism. Topic varies. ANTH B400 may be taken twice with different topics. (Occasionally)
  • ANTH-B 464 Human Paleontology (3 cr.) P: ANTH A103 or ANTH A105 or ANTH B200 or 6 credit hours of biology. Human fossils: their structure, classification, geologic range, and geographical distribution. (Occasionally)
  • ANTH-B 466 The Primates (3 cr.) P: Any one of ANTH A103, ANTH A105, ANTH B200, or 6 credit hours in biology or consent of instructor. Paleontology, functional morphology, behavior, and natural history of the nonhuman primates. Emphasis on behavioral and ecological correlates of morphology. Credit given for only one of the following: ANTH B106, ANTH B266, and ANTH B466. (Occasionally)
  • ANTH-E 200 Social and Cultural Anthropology (3 cr.) P: ANTH A104. Intermediate survey of theories and problems in social and cultural anthropology. Historical development, methods of inquiry, focal problems, and contemporary theoretical perspectives. (Fall)
  • ANTH-E 205 Peoples of the World (3 cr.) P: ANTH A104. All peoples have to confront similar challenges in order to survive and thrive as individuals and as societies.  This course will examine how several cultures around the world shape their values, behaviors, institutions, and stories in response to external and internal challenges. (Occasionally)
  • ANTH-E 300 Culture Areas and Ethnic Groups (variable title) (1-3 cr.) P: ANTH A104. An ethnographic survey of a selected culture area or ethnic group. (May not be repeated for more than 6 credit hours.) (Occasionally)
  • ANTH-E 320 Indians of North America (3 cr.) P: ANTH A104. Ethnographic survey of culture areas from the Arctic to Panama plus cross- cultural analysis of interrelations of culture, geographical environment, and language families. (Fall, Spring)
  • ANTH-E 324 Native American Art (3 cr.) P: A104. This course is an introduction to the visual arts of Native Americans in the period since contact.  Topics will include  the artist (traditional and contemporary); the relationship of art, myth, and ritual the effects of contact  with other cultures on Indian arts; shamanism and art.  Class discussion will be illustrated with slides and movies. (Occasionally)
  • ANTH-E 335 Ancient Civilization of MesoAmerica (3 cr.) P: A104. Historical Ethnography of the major pre- Columbian Civilizations including the Olmec, Mayan and Aztec. Emphasis on the social life, cultural achievements, religion, worldview, and political systems to illustrate the diversity and richness of Amerindian life before the Spanish conquest. (Occasionally)
  • ANTH-E 400 Undergraduate Seminar (topic varies) (3 cr.) P: ANTH A104, and junior standing. Intensive examination of selected topics in anthropology. Emphasis upon analytic investigation and critical discussion. Topics will vary. ANTH E400 may be taken twice with different topics. (Occasionally)
  • ANTH-E 445 Medical Anthropology (3 cr.) P: ANTH A104. A cross- cultural examination of human biocultural adaptation in health and disease, including biocultural epidemiology, ethnomedical systems in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease, and sociocultural change and health. (Occasionally)
  • ANTH-L 300 Culture and Language (3 cr.) P: ANTH A104. Explores the relationships between language and culture, focusing on research methodology and surveying various theoretical frameworks. (Spring—odd years)
  • ANTH-P 200 Introduction to Archaeology (3 cr.) P: ANTH A104 & A105. Introduction to the goals, methods, and theories that archaeologists use to learn about the past.   The pursuit and interpretation of archaeological evidence are explored by reviewing case studies from  across the globe and diverse time periods. Topics include food and subsistence, culture change, social life, political economies, and archaeological ethics. (Spring)
Astronomy (AST)
  • AST-A 100 The Solar System (3 cr.) Celestial sphere and constellations, measurement of time, astronomical instruments, earth as a planet, moon, eclipses, planets and their satellites, comets, meteors, theories of origin of solar system. (Fall)
  • AST-A 105 Stellar Astronomy (3 cr.) The sun as a star, physical properties of stars, principles of spectroscopy as applied to astronomy, double stars, variable stars, star clusters, gaseous nebulae, stellar motions and distributions, Milky Way system, external galaxies, expanding universe, cosmic time scale. (Spring)
  • AST-A 200 Introduction to Cosmology (3 cr.) P: A college-level introductory course in astronomy, chemistry, or physics An introduction to the ultimate structure and evolution of the universe. Topics include history of cosmology, nature of galaxies, space-time and relativity, models of the universe, black holes, quasars, and sources of gravitational radiation. (Occasionally)
Biology (BIOL)
  • BIOL-B 351 Fungi (3 cr.) P: BIOL L101 and BIOL L102. R: Junior or senior standing or consent of the instructor. Morphology, life histories, classification, genetics, physiology, development, ecology, medical and economic importance of fungi. (Occasionally)

  • BIOL-B 352 Fungi Laboratory (2 cr.) P or C: B351.  R: Junior or senior standing or consent of instructor.  Laboratory and field studies of fungi and their activities. (Occasionally)

  • BIOL-B 355 Plant Diversity (4 cr.) P: an introductory biology course Study of major plant groups - algae to flowering plants. Information will be provided on classification, evolution, ecology, cytology, morphology, anatomy, reproduction, life cycle, and economic importance. Two lectures and one three- hour laboratory per week. (Fall)
  • BIOL-B 364 Summer Flowering Plants (5 cr.) P: one introductory biology course For those desiring a broad, practical knowledge of common wild and cultivated plants. (Summer I or II)
  • BIOL-E 111 Basic Biology by Examination I (3 cr.) Credit by examination for demonstrating an understanding of the basic facts and concepts of the lecture content of BIOL-L 102. Credit not given for both BIOL-E 111 and BIOL-L 102 or BIOL-L 111. Lecture credit only. One additional laboratory course must be included in the core program. (Occasionally)
  • BIOL-E 112 Basic Biology by Examination II (3 cr.) Credit by examination for demonstrating an understanding of basic facts and concepts of the lecture content of BIOL-L 101. Credit not given for both BIOL-E 112 and BIOL-L 101 or BIOL-L 112.
  • BIOL-L 100 Humans and the Biological World (3-5 cr.) Principles of biological organization, from molecules through cells and organizations to populations. Emphasis on processes common to all organisms with special reference to humans. Credit will be given for only one of the following introductory-level courses or sequences: BIOL-L 100, BIOL-L 104, BIOL-L 101 - BIOL-L 102, PHSL-P 130.
  • BIOL-L 101 Introduction to the Biological Sciences I (4 cr.) R: CHEM-C 105 concurrently An introductory course designed for prospective biology majors and students majoring in ancillary sciences. Principles of life processes including the chemical basis of life, cell structure and function, genetics, and evolution. (Fall, Spring)
  • BIOL-L 102 Introduction to the Biological Sciences II (4 cr.) Integrates a brief survey of the diversity of life with an emphasis on a comparative review of the major functional systems in diverse groups and an introduction to the principles of ecology. (Summer, Spring) 
  • BIOL-L 104 Introductory Biology Lectures (3 cr.) An introduction to living organisms. Designed for nonscientists with no background in biology. Does not count as a preprofessional course. Primary emphasis may vary with the instructor. Credit given for only one of the following: BIOL-L 100, BIOL-L 104, BIOL-E 112, or BIOL-Q 201.
  • BIOL-L 200 Environmental Biology and Conservation (3 cr.) Study of flora and fauna of northwest Indiana through laboratory and fieldwork. Emphasis on identification, classification, life histories, and habitats of organisms and their conservation as renewable resources. (Summer)
  • BIOL-L 211 Molecular Biology (3 cr.) P: BIOL-L 101 Structure and function of DNA and RNA. DNA replication, mechanisms of mutation, repair, recombination, and transposition. Mechanism and regulation of gene expression. The genetic code, transcription, and translation. Introduces bacteriophages, plasmids, and the technology of recombinant DNA. (Fall)  
  • BIOL-L 215 Conservation Biology (3 cr.) P: sophomore standing. Fundamental ecology will be presented and applied to conservation of ecosystems and wildlife. In laboratory sessions, students will perform research on restoration of an ecosystem, for example, a prairie. This course is for nonmajors only. (Summer I)
  • BIOL-L 290 Introduction to Biological Research (1 cr.) P: BIOL-L 101 An introduction to the biological research at IU Northwest, preparing students to undertake BIOL-L 490 research projects. (Fall, Spring)  
  • BIOL-L 300 Social Implications of Biology (3 cr.) Biological aspects of social problems such as AIDS, genetic engineering, population explosion, eugenics, drug abuse, heredity, hazards of irradiation, etc. (Occasionally)
  • BIOL-L 302 Topics in Human Biology (3 cr.) P: nonmajor junior or senior standing Physiology, genetics, and biochemistry. Topics to be considered may vary from year to year: cancer, genetic diseases, cardiovascular diseases, blood groups, immune system, genetic damage, contraception and pregnancy, genetics of intelligence, environmental hazards, genetic engineering, etc. (Occasionally)  
  • BIOL-L 311 Genetics (3-4 cr.) P: BIOL-L 211 or consent of instructor. Principles governing the transmission of specific traits to the progeny of prokaryotes and eukaryotes, including bacteria, viruses, fungi, higher plants, and animals. Analysis at the level of the individual and population; interactions between genetic constitution and environment; application to the study of development, human genetic disease,and agricultural breeding. Credit not given for both BIOL-L 311 and BIOL-S 311. (Spring)   
  • BIOL-L 312 Cell Biology (3-4 cr.) P: BIOL-L 211. Current views of the structure and function of cellular organelles and components, with emphasis on the flow of information through the cell, the metabolism that supports cellular functions, and differences among different specialized cells.  Current techniques will be stressed. (Fall)
  • BIOL-L 316 Fundamentals of Human Sexuality (3 cr.) P: junior standing An exploration of the anatomical and physiological factors relating to the development of human sexuality with particular emphasis on the biological mechanisms involved in health and disease. (Summer I or II).
  • BIOL-L 318 Evolution (3 cr.) P: BIOL-L 311 or BIOL-S 311 Provides a rigorous exploration of the theory of evolution; the conceptual core of biology. Topics include origins and history of life: the interplay of heredity and environment in shaping adaptations; molecular, behavioral, and social evolution; patterns of speciation, extinction, and their consequences; methods of inferring evolutionary relationships among organisms. Credit not given for both BIOL-L 318 and BIOL-S 318, or both BIOL-L 318 and BIOL-L 479. (Occasionally)  
  • BIOL-L 321 Principles of Immunology (3 cr.) P: BIOL-L 211 and CHEM-C 101 or CHEM-C 105 An introductory survey of the basic principles of immunology and their practical applications. (Spring)   
  • BIOL-L 323 Molecular Biology Laboratory (3 cr.) P: BIOL-L 211 Manipulation and analysis of genes and genomes. Gene cloning and library screening. Gene amplification and disease diagnosis. Gene mapping and southern blot analysis of complex genome structure. Credit given for only one of BIOL-L 323, BIOL-L 324, or BIOL-S 211.    
  • BIOL-L 331 Human Genetics (3 cr.) Principles of heredity at the molecular, cellular, individual, and population levels.  Credit not given for both BIOL-L 363 and BIOL-L 331.  
  • BIOL-L 363 Genetics and Humans (3 cr.) Principles of heredity at the molecular, cellular, individual, and population levels. Credit not given for both BIOL-L 363 and BIOL-L 331. (Fall)
  • BIOL-L 378 Biological Aspects of Aging (3 cr.) P: BIOL-L 100, PHYS-P 130, or the equivalent Biological mechanisms that alter cells with age and the effects those changes have on the human organism as a whole. Models for the aging process will be presented, as well as research done on the major systems of the body. (Summer I or II)
  • BIOL-L 391 Special Topics in Biology (1-3 cr.) P: consent of the instructor Study and analysis of selected biological issues and problems. Topics vary from semester to semester. May be repeated with change in topics. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)     May be repeated with change in topics
  • BIOL-L 403 Biology Seminar (1 cr.) Individual presentation of topics of current importance. Student cannot enroll for more than two semesters for credit. (Fall, Spring)    
  • BIOL-L 473 Ecology (3-4 cr.) P: 8 credit hours of biology courses above the 100 level Major concepts of ecology for science majors or science education majors; relation of individual organisms to their environment; population ecology; structure and function of ecosystems. Credit not given for both BIOL-L 473 and BIOL-S 309. Course serves as one option for capstone course for the biology major.(Fall)    
  • BIOL-L 474 Field and Laboratory Ecology (2 cr.) P: or concurrent: BIOL-L 473 and one course in organismal biology Introduction to research problems and techniques in the ecology of individuals, populations, and ecosystems. This course does not serve as the BIOL-L 473 lab. (Fall)   
  • BIOL-L 476 Regional Ecology (2 cr.) P: or concurrent: BIOL-L 473 or consent of the instructor Open to juniors and seniors only. Selective trips to ecological areas to study both the flora and fauna of a biome. (Summer I or II)   
  • BIOL-L 482 Restoration Ecology (3 cr.) P: 8 credit hours of biology courses at or above the 300 level This course presents the fundamentals of ecology and restoration ecology to the restoration / reestablishment of natural ecological communities. The lab will feature actual restoration / reestablishment of wetlands, prairies, savannas, woodlands, and forests of Northwest Indiana. (Fall)   
  • BIOL-L 483 Conservation Biology (3 cr.) P: 8 credit hours of biology courses at or above the 300 level This course will present scientific fundamentals applied to conservation of endangered species, biodiversity, and ecosystems. The lab will feature field experiments that evaluate the level of success of various conservation projects (e.g., plant diversity, animal diversity, ecosystem function) in Northwest Indiana. (Fall)   
  • BIOL-L 490 Individual Study (1-3 cr.) P: written permission of faculty supervising research Must complete a written assignment as evidence of each semester's work and present an oral report to complete more than 6 credit hours. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, II)     May be repeated up to a total of 12 credit hours.
  • BIOL-L 498 Internship in Professional Practice (1-6 cr.) Provides an opportunity for students to receive credit for selected career-related work. Evaluation by employer and faculty sponsor on a satisfactory / unsatisfactory basis. (Fall, Spring)    
  • BIOL-L 499 Internship in Biology Instruction (3 cr.) P: consent of departmental chairperson Supervised experience in teaching undergraduate biology courses. May be repeated once for credit. (Fall, Spring, Summer)      May be repeated once for credit
  • BIOL-M 200 Microorganism in Nature and Disease (4 cr.) R: high school chemistry and biology Principles of microbiology, including the study of major microbial groups, cultivation, physiology and genetics, destruction, and control of microorganisms in nature and disease. For students in programs requiring one semester of microbiology (not premedical or medical technology students). Includes laboratory (Fall, Spring, Summer I)
  • BIOL-M 215 Microorganism Laboratory (1 cr.) BIOL-M 200 must be taken concurrently. Introduction to basic techniques and procedures of microbiology laboratories. Emphasis on aspects useful to nursing students. Growth and transfer of living microorganisms, aseptic techniques, and the staining of and identification of bacteria. (Fall, Spring, Summer I)
  • BIOL-M 310 Microbiology (3-4 cr.) P: CHEM-C 105 - CHEM-C 106, BIOL-L 211, or permission of instructor Application of fundamental biological principles to the study of microorganisms. Significance of microorganisms to humans and their environment. (Fall)     
  • BIOL-M 315 Microbiology Laboratory (2 cr.) P: BIOL-M 310 C: BIOL-M 310 Laboratory exercises and demonstrations to yield proficiency in the principles and techniques of cultivation and the use of microorganisms under aseptic conditions. (Fall)     
  • BIOL-M 430 Virology: Lecture (3 cr.) P: BIOL-L 211 and BIOL-L 311 or BIOL-M 310 R: BIOL-L 312 Viruses of plants, animals (including humans), and bacteria: emphasis on molecular biology of viral systems. Viruses and human disease such as cancer and AIDS; viruses and their evolution. (Occasionally)     
  • BIOL-M 440 Medical Microbiology (3 cr.) P: BIOL-M 310 or permission of instructor Microorganisms as agents of disease; host / parasite relationships; epidemiology; chemotherapy. (Occasionally) This course may fulfill the capstone requirement.     
  • BIOL-N 213 Human Biology Lab (1 cr.) Laboratory to accompany Human Biology Lecture.  Students must be concurrently enrolled in Human Biology (P130) lecture.  Consent of instructor is required. (Fall)
  • BIOL-Z 317 Developmental Biology (3 cr.) P: BIOL-L 311 Analysis of developmental processes that lead to the construction of whole organisms from single cells. Includes the principles of embryology and analysis of mutations affecting development. (Occasionally)
  • BIOL-Z 318 Developmental Biology Laboratory (2 cr.) P: BIOL-L 211, BIOL-L 311, BIOL-L 317 C: BIOL-L 317 A laboratory about developing organisms, with emphasis on vetrebrate embryology and organogenesis.    
  • BIOL-Z 406 Vertebrate Zoology (3-4 cr.) P: BIOL-L 101 and BIOL-L 102 Morphology, ecology, life history, physiology, and general biology of vertebrates. (Spring)     
  • BIOL-Z 466 Endocrinology (3 cr.) P: BIOL L211 and CHEM C341 or the equivalent, organic chemistry, and at least junior standing Experimental procedures and results relative to glandular interrelationships; mode of actions of hormones and their role in behavior of organisms. (Occasionally) This course may fulfill the capstone requirement.
Canadian Studies (CDNS)
  • CDNS-C 101 Introduction to Canadian Studies (3 cr.) This interdisciplinary course introduces the student to some of the problems explored by the humanities and social sciences in the study of Canada. Themes will vary from year to year and could cover topics such as Canadian-American relations, Quebec's special status, regionalism, trade, and the environment. (Fall)
  • CDNS-C 301 Canadian Diversity (3 cr.) P: CDNS-C101 Study of diversity in contemporary Quebec and English Canada through a variety of interdisciplinary readings drawn from literature, culture studies, politics, and social history. Course may focus on the multicultural experience in Canada, on particular ethnic or racial groups, or on other dimensions of diversity as evidenced by cultural, linguistic, religious, or sexual minorities. (Spring)
  • CDNS-C 350 Introduction to French Canadian Literature and Civilization (3 cr.) The civilization of French Canada from New France to the present. Tendencies in the novel from the late-nineteenth century to the beginning of the twenty-first century. Selections from poetry anthologies, with special emphasis on Nelligan, Grandbois, and the contemporary scene. Selected plays from Gelinas to Desrosiers. (Occasionally)
  • CDNS-C 400 Comparative Canadian Literature (3 cr.) Survey of French and English Canadian fiction, from a comparative perspective. Representative works from early-twentieth-century novelists to the contemporary period. (Occasionally)
  • CDNS-C 495 Advanced Topics in Canadian Studies (3 cr.) P: junior standing or consent of the instructor Seminar or small group discussion of topics in Canadian studies; independent study or research in selected problems in Canadian studies. (Occasionally)
  • CDNS-H 230 History of Canada (3 cr.) Canada as a French colony, as a British colony, and as a nation evolving through dominion status as an independent entity (with ties to both Anglophone and Francophone nations) and seeking a viable existence with the United States despite the vast difference in population size. (Occasionally)
  • CDNS-T 315 North American Landscap (3 cr.) P: course in physical or general geology. Gives the student an elementary understanding of various geologic controls and processes that have produced the topographic features. Regional concept stressed rather than individual landforms. The continent is divided into geomorphic regions based on similar geologic controls and geomorphic histories.(Occasionally)
  • CDNS-Y 217 Introduction to Comparative Politics (3 cr.) Studies foreign political systems of Western and non-Western countries. Includes comparative political analysis, organized by topics, emphasizing nongovernmental as well as governmental power. Discussion will include economics systems, social classes, national groupings, constitutions, bureaucracies, political parties, armies, elements of political culture, and types of political change. (Occasionally)
Chemistry (CHEM)
  • CHEM-C 100 The World of Chemistry (3 cr.) Intended for nonscience majors, the chemistry of everyday life—water, air, plastics, fuels, nutrition, medicinal and agricultural products, living systems, and consumer chemistry. Lectures illustrated by visual displays, computer animation, and interviews with famous scientists and on-site demonstrations of industrial processes. (Fall, Spring, often in Summer I or Summer II)
  • CHEM-C 101 Elementary Chemistry I (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 007 or equivalent Introduction to chemistry, includes chemical and gas laws, atomic and molecular structure, energy, equilibrium, kinetics, states of matter, and applications in chemical processes. Usually taken concurrently with CHEM-C 121. Lectures and discussion. The two sequences, CHEM-C 101-CHEM-C 121 and CHEM-C 102-CHEM-C 122, usually satisfy programs that require only two semesters of chemistry. Admission to advanced courses on basis of CHEM-C 101, CHEM-C 121, CHEM-C 102, CHEM-C 122 granted only in exceptional cases. May be taken without credit in preparation for CHEM-C 105. Credit given for only CHEM-C 101 or CHEM-C 105. (Fall, Spring, often in Summer I or Summer II)
  • CHEM-C 102 Elementary Chemistry II (3 cr.) P: CHEM-C 101 Continuation of CHEM-C 101. Usually taken concurrently with CHEM-C 122. The chemistry of organic compounds and their reactions, followed by an extensive introduction to biochemistry. Lectures and discussion. (Spring, occasionally in Summer I or Summer II)
  • CHEM-C 105 Principles of Chemistry I (3 cr.) P: two years of high school algebra or MATH-M 014, one year of high school chemistry; CHEM-C 125 recommended concurrently Basic principles, including stoichiometry, atomic and molecular structure, bonding, gases, and solutions. Lectures and discussion. Credit given for only CHEM-C 101 or CHEM-C 105. (Fall, Spring)
  • CHEM-C 106 Principles of Chemistry II (3 cr.) P: CHEM-C 105 CHEM-C 126 recommended concurrently. Chemical equilibria with emphasis on acids, bases, solubility, and electrochemistry; elementary thermodynamics; chemical kinetics; descriptive chemistry; and coordination compounds. Lectures and discussion. (Spring, Summer II)
  • CHEM-C 110 The Chemistry of Life (3 cr.) Intended for nonscience majors, the qualitative survey of chemistry with applications to biology and health.  Emphasis is placed on foundation chemistry and the chemistry of biomolecules and their interactions. 
  • CHEM-C 120 Chemistry Laboratory (2 cr.) P:  or C: CHEM-C 100, laboratory component of CHEM-C 100. Experiments illustrating chemical principles and their applications to biology, environment, and health sciences.  Laboratory and laboratory lecture. (Fall, Spring)
  • CHEM-C 121 Elementary Chemistry Laboratory I (2 cr.) P: CHEM-C 101 C: CHEM-C 101 An introduction to the techniques and reasoning of experimental chemistry. (Fall, Spring, often in Summer I or Summer II)
  • CHEM-C 122 Elementary Chemistry Laboratory II (2 cr.) P: CHEM-C 101, CHEM-C 121, CHEM-C 102 C: CHEM-C 102 Continuation of CHEM-C 121. Emphasis on organic and biochemical experimental techniques. (Spring)
  • CHEM-C 125 Experimental Chemistry I (2 cr.) P: CHEM-C 105 C: CHEM-C 105 An introduction to laboratory experi­mentation with emphasis on the collection and use of experimental data, some properties of solutions, stoichiometry, molecular geometry, and synthesis. (Fall, Spring)
  • CHEM-C 126 Experimental Chemistry II (2 cr.) P: CHEM-C 106 or concurrent, CHEM-C 125. A continuation of CHEM-C 125 with emphasis on equilibria, qualitative analysis, acids and bases, thermodynamics, oxidation-reduction (including electrochemistry), chemical kinetics, and spectrometry. (Spring, Summer II)
  • CHEM-C 209 Special Problems (1-2 cr.) Preparation of special reports on topic(s) designated by chemistry faculty from the results of the proficiency examination. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
  • CHEM-C 301 Chemistry Seminar (1 cr.) P: 18 credit hours of chemistry with a grade point average of at least 2.5 Independent study and reading with emphasis on basic chemistry and interdisciplinary applications. Research reports and discussions by students and faculty. (Spring)
  • CHEM-C 303 Environmental Chemistry Lecture (3 cr.) P: CHEM-C 106, CHEM-C 126, and CHEM-C 341 Investigation of the chemistry of water and air pollution; analytical procedures and techniques as applied to pollution problems, effects, and controls. This course will be offered as part of a postbaccalaureate environmental sciences certificate. (Fall—alternate year)
  • CHEM-C 310 Analytical Chemistry (3-5 cr.) P: CHEM-C 341 or CHEM-C 342 and MATH-M 215, CHEM-C 361 for majors Fundamental analytical processes, including solution equilibria, electrochemical theory and applications, and selected instrumental methods. (Fall, Spring—twice every three years)
  • CHEM-C 335 Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory (1-3 cr.) P: CHEM-C 430 C: CHEM-C 430 Preparation of inorganic and organometallic compounds illustrating special and advanced techniques, including characterization by modern physical methods. (Spring—alternate year)
  • CHEM-C 341 Organic Chemistry Lecture I (3 cr.) P: CHEM-C 106, CHEM-C 126 Chemistry of carbon compounds. Nomenclature; qualitative theory of valence; structure and reactions. Syntheses and reactions of major classes of monofunctional compounds. (Fall)
  • CHEM-C 342 Organic Chemistry Lecture II (3 cr.) P: CHEM-C 343 C: CHEM-C 343 Syntheses and reactions of polyfunctional compounds, natural and industrial products; physical and chemical methods of identification. (Spring)
  • CHEM-C 343 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I (2 cr.) P: CHEM-C 341 C: CHEM-C 341 Laboratory instruction in the fundamental techniques of organic chemistry and the use of general synthetic methods. (Fall)
  • CHEM-C 344 Organic Chemistry Laboratory II (2 cr.) P: CHEM-C 343, CHEM-C 342 C: CHEM-C 342 Preparation, isolation, and identification of organic compounds; emphasis on modern research methods. (Spring)
  • CHEM-C 361 Physical Chemistry I (3 cr.) P: CHEM-C 106; MATH-M 216; PHYS-P 202 or PHYS-P 222 (either MATH M216 or PHYS P202 /PHYS P222 concurrent). Chemical thermodynamics and kinetics, introduction to statistical thermodynamics. (Fall)
  • CHEM-C 362 Physical Chemistry II (3 cr.) P: CHEM-C 361 Introduction to quantum mechanics. Structure and spectra of atoms, molecules, and solids. (Spring— alternate year)
  • CHEM-C 363 Experimental Physical Chemistry (2-4 cr.) P: CHEM-C 106, CHEM-C 361 or concurrent. Experimental work to illustrate principles of physical chemistry and to introduce research techniques. (Fall)
  • CHEM-C 403 History of Chemistry I (1 cr.) P: senior standing, consent of instructor Development of significant chemical knowledge and concepts through the nineteenth century. Student report and discussion. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
  • CHEM-C 409 Chemical Research (1-5 cr.) P: senior standing (open also to Honors juniors), grade point average of at least 2.8 in all chemistry courses Can be elected only after consultation with research advisor and approval of chairperson. May be taken for total of 10 credit hours. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
  • CHEM-C 410 Principles of Chemical Instrumentation (4 cr.) P: CHEM-C 310 or consent of instructor Theory and practice of modern analytical methods, including electro-analytical techniques, quantitative spectrophotometry, magnetic methods, extraction, and chromatography. (Spring—twice every three years)
  • CHEM-C 430 Inorganic Chemistry (3 cr.) P: CHEM-C 361 or consent of instructor Structural inorganic chemistry, coordination compounds, mechanisms of inorganic reactions, inorganic synthetic methods. Special topics. (Fall)
  • CHEM-C 431 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3 cr.) P: CHEM-C 430 Systematic descriptive chemistry of the elements. Emphasis onperiodic properties, chemical bonding, and thermodynamic and kinetic properties. (Spring—alternate year)
  • CHEM-C 441 Advanced Organic Chemistry (3 cr.) P: CHEM-C 342 The structure of organic compounds, the mechanisms, and the synthetic application of organic reactions. (Spring—alternate year)
  • CHEM-C 483 Biological Chemistry (3 cr.) P: 13 credit hours of chemistry, including CHEM-C 341 Introduction to structure, chemical properties, and interrelationships of biological substances. (Spring— alternate year)
Chicano Riqueño Studies (CHRI)
  • CHRI-C 101 Introduction to Latino Studies (3 cr.) An introduction to the most important themes of the Chicano and Puerto Rican experiences from the disciplinary perspectives of arts, education, folklore, history, literature, music, political science, and sociology. Pre-Columbian to World War II. (Fall, Summer I)
  • CHRI-C 151 Minority People in the United States (3 cr.) A study of the cultural experiences of minority people in the United States. Focus will be on African Americans and Latinos. Other minority groups will be studied where appropriate. The course will be interdisciplinary in nature with a heavy emphasis on the analysis of original texts. Credit may not be earned for both AFRO-A 151 and CHRI-C 151. (Spring)
  • CHRI-C 213 Politics of Chicano Cultural Identity (3 cr.) Following the conclusion of World War II, a relatively distinct Chicano racial/cultural identity emerges in communities throughout the Southwest and major urban areas of the Midwest. This course examines the relationship between this cultural identity and the Chicano social movement politics of the 1960s and early 1970s. (Spring)
  • CHRI-C 290 Topics in Latino Studies (3 cr.) P: consent of the instructor Analysis of selected topics and contemporary issues related to the Chicano and Puerto Rican experiences in the United States. Topics will be chosen by the instructor and vary from semester to semester. May be repeated once with a different topic. (Fall, Spring)
  • CHRI-C 301 History of Puerto Rico (3 cr.) Colonization by Spain; international development; Spanish-American War; occupation by United States; economic, social and political development; migration to the mainland; debate on independence, autonomy, and statehood. Cross-listed with (HIST-F 301) (Occasionally)
  • CHRI-C 351 Latino Culture and Society (3 cr.) P: sophomore standing or consent of instructor This course will be a survey of Latino culture and society in the United States. There will be an emphasis on how Latinos have used forms of cultural expression to interpret their experience in this country. (Occasionally)
  • CHRI-C 352 History of Latinos in the United States (3 cr.) Latino experience in the United States; economic and social factors of the Latino role in a non-Latino nation. Cross-listed with HIST-A 352. (Fall)
  • CHRI-C 444 History of Mexico (3 cr.) Brief survey of the colonial period and independence movement. Ideological conflicts within Republic. Revolution of 1910. Relationship with United States from Mexican viewpoint. Cross-listed with  HIST-F 444.  (Occasionally)
  • CHRI-C 446 Mexican and Puerto Rican Immigration and Migration (3 cr.) Study of the migration of Mexicans and Puerto Ricans to the United States. Emphasis will be on push-pull factors of migration; the incorporation of both groups into the American socioeconomic structure; the role of federal legislation in patterns of migration; and the special plight of undocumented workers. (Occasionally)
  • CHRI-C 490 Topics in Latino Studies (3 cr.) Extensive analysis of selected topics and contemporary issues relating to the Chicano and Puerto Rican experiences in the United States. Topics vary from semester to semester. May be repeated once with a different topic. (Fall, Spring)
  • CHRI-C 495 Individual Readings in Latino Studies (1-3 cr.) P: consent of instructor Intensive study of a specific problem in Chicano-Riqueño studies. May be repeated once for credit. (Fall, Spring).
Comparative Literature (CMLT)
  • CMLT-C 190 An Introduction to Film (3 cr.) Nature of film technique and film language; analysis of specific films and introduction to major critical approaches in film studies. (Occasionally)
  • CMLT-C 253 Third World and Black American Films (3 cr.) Black American films, both within the Hollywood "mainstream" and from the more independent producers; films from Africa, India, and Latin America. Discussion and analysis of the individual films as well as their cultural backgrounds. (Occasionally)
  • CMLT-C 261 Introduction to African Literature (3 cr.) Oral and written poetry, epic, fiction, and drama from around the continent used to illustrate varied aspects of African life, aesthetic issues, and theoretical debates. (Every other year)
  • CMLT-C 340 Women in World Literature (3 cr.) R: 3 credits in literature. Comparison of attitudes toward women in works of different ages and societies. Study of stereotyped images in relation to literary and social conventions. Focus on one genre or mode each time course is offered (e.g., women in drama, in narrative, in satire). (Occasionally)
  • CMLT-C 460 Origins of African Literature (3 cr.) The roots of Francophone African literature in the Antilles. Haitian literature (Price-Mars, Césaire, Dépestre). The Paris movement of Negritude (Senghor, Damas, Césaire). Contribution of Afro-American writers (Hughes, McKay, Toomer). African poetry (Senghor, D. Diop, Dadie) and novels (Camara Laye, Beti, Oyono). All readings in English translations. (Occasionally)
College of Arts and Sciences (COAS)
  • COAS-J 151 Career Exploration and Development (1 cr.) Provides an opportunity to explore career options and define career objectives through the use of recognized occupational preference tests, self-evaluation techniques, guest lecturers, and outside readings. Intended for freshmen and sophomores.
  • COAS-S 104 Freshman Seminar in Social and Historical Studies (3 cr.) This class is designed to help first-year students begin a successful college career. It includes a broad range of topics and experiences designed to help students adjust to college-level work. Topics will vary. Open only to freshmen.
  • COAS-W 398 Internship in Professional Practice (1-6 cr.)
Communication (COMM)
  • COMM-C 320 Advanced Public Speaking (3 cr.) P: SPCH-S 121 Development of a marked degree of skills in preparation and delivery of various types of speeches, with emphasis on depth of research, clarity of organization, application of proof, and felicitous style. (Occasionally)
  • COMM-C 340 Practicum in Media Production (3 cr.) This course is designed to give students hands-on practical experience with all facets of television and radio production. In this course, students will work with others as part of a team in media production and complete a comprehensive and professional quality portfolio of his or her work.
  • COMM-C 351 TV Production I (3 cr.) P: TEL-C 200 Coordination and integration of production principles for practical application in television; emphasis on studio production of nondramatic program forms. Lecture and laboratory. (Occasionally)
  • COMM-C 462 Media Theory and Criticism (3 cr.) P: TEL-C 200 Description and evaluation of various theoretical strategies that attempt to explain the ways individuals and groups react to media. Critical analysis of several media with attention to the connective and artistic functions of visual and aural components. (Occasionally)
  • COMM-M 460 Culture and Mass Communication (3 cr.) P: TEL-C 200 This course is a critical overview of the relationship between mass media and American culture. Course content will explore what it means (politically, economically, culturally, and morally) to live in a culture in which a major portion of information comes to the citizen through multiple channels of mass communication. (Occasionally)
Computer Science (CSCI)

Computer Science (CSCI) and Data Processing and Information Systems (DPIS) courses are listed in separate sections.

  • CSCI-A 103 Microcomputer Applications: Word Processing (1 cr.) P: Placement by CSCI-A 106 placement test Word processing portion of CSCI-A 106. To be taught concurrently with CSCI-A 106. Lecture and laboratory. Credit not given for both CSCI-A 103 and (CSCI-A 106 or CSCI-A 200) and BUS-K 201.
  • CSCI-A 104 Microcomputer Applications: Spreadsheets (1 cr.) P: Placement by CSCI-A 106 placement test Spreadsheet portion of CSCI-A 106. To be taught concurrently with CSCI-A 106. Lecture and laboratory. Credit not given for both CSCI-A 104 and (CSCI-A 106 or CSCI-A 200) and BUS-K 201.
  • CSCI-A 105 Microcomputer Applications: Databases (1 cr.) P: Placement by CSCI-A 106 placement test Relational database portion of CSCI-A 106. To be taught concurrently with CSCI-A 106. Lecture and laboratory. Credit not given for both CSCI-A 105 and (CSCI-A 106 or CSCI-A 200) and BUS-K 201.
  • CSCI-A 106 Introduction to Computing (3 cr.) The use of computers in everyday activities. How computers work; use of packaged programs for word processing, spreadsheets, file management, communication, graphics, etc. Lecture and laboratory. No credit given for both CSCI-A 106 and BUS-K 201. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
  • CSCI-A 201 Introduction to Computers and Programming (4 cr.) P: CSCI-A 150, or MATH-M 100 or higher, or consent of instructor Emphasis on modular programming, user-interface design, and documentation principles. (Fall)
  • CSCI-A 210 Introduction to Visual Basic Programming (4 cr.) P: DPIS-D 150, or MATH-M 100 or higher Introduction to business application program­ming. Students learn the skills necessary to design and implement programs and program interfaces using rapid application development techniques and visual development tools such as Visual Basic. (Fall)
  • CSCI-A 213 Database Applications (3 cr.) P: CSCI-A106.

    This course introduces the student to database techniques.  The student will develop tables, custom forms, reports, and queries.  Advanced topics include developing ASP pages for the WWW, developing and understanding relationship database design, macros, securing a database, integrating Access with the web and other programs. 

  • CSCI-A 247 Network Technologies and Administration (3 cr.) P: CSCI-C 106 or consent of instructor Introduction to network principles and current network technology, both hardware and software. Network administration tools and techniques. Laboratory exercises provide practical experience. (Spring)
  • CSCI-A 251 Introduction to Digital Imaging Applications (3 cr.) P: CSCI-A 106 An introduction to digital imaging software applications such as Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator. Students will learn the technical skills necessary to use such digital imaging software, primarily for the use of Office applications and Web development. (once a year)
  • CSCI-A 285 Advanced Microcomputer Applications (3 cr.) P: CSCI-A 106 or consent of instructor Introduces and applies advanced features of microcomputer applications packages such as word processors, spreadsheets, graphic presentation software, etc. Emphasis is put on the movement of data among various software packages and on the creation and use of macros, styles, and scripts. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
  • CSCI-A 302 Object-Oriented Programming Techniques (4 cr.) P: CSCI-A 201 or consent of instructor Advanced programming techniques: user-oriented functions and types, recursion versus iteration, parameter-passing mechanisms. Abstract data types: stacks, queues, linked lists, trees, hash tables. Algorithmic solutions to standard problems of searching, sorting, string matching, space-time complexity. Continued emphasis on programming styles issues. Object-oriented programming. Credit cannot be given for both CSCI-A 302 and INFO-I 211 except with permission. (Spring)
  • CSCI-A 340 An Introduction to Web Programming (3 cr.) P: CSCI-A 348 An introduction to programming Web documents, including HTML, JavaScript, and Perl. Creation of a simple Web site, including a home page with dynamic elements, using both client-side and server-side techniques. (Fall)
  • CSCI-A 346 User Interface Programming (3 cr.) P: CSCI-A 210, or consent of instructor Learn to prototype and build graphical user interfaces for computer applications, using contemporary software design methodology. Students design and implement prototype interfaces to applications provided by the instructor. Extensive use of both commercial and experimental software tools. (Spring)
  • CSCI-A 347 Computer and Network Security Essentials (3 cr.) The computing security problem. Threats, vulnerabilities, exploits, defenses, and countermeasures. Firewalls and TCP/IP services. Information and risk. Implementing security policies and practices. Disaster planning, prevention, and recovery operations. Legal, ethical and privacy issues. (Spring, Fall, alternate years)
  • CSCI-A 348 Mastering the World Wide Web (3 cr.) P: CSCI-A 106 or CSCI-C 106 Survey of World Wide Web applications and use including browsers, search engines, e-mail, news groups, FTP, multimedia, etc. Design and develop personal and professional Web pages using hypertext and scripting languages. Publishing and posting Web pages and documents. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
  • CSCI-A 447 Advanced Networking Systems and Administration (3 cr.) P: CSCI-A 247 or CSCI-C 106 This course provides a comprehensive study of LAN communication protocols.  The Open Systems Interconnect (OSI) model, client/server operating system architectures, basic security services, and systems administration concepts.  Students design, construct, administer a LAN using a popular network operating system. (Spring)
  • CSCI-C 106 Introduction to Computers and Their Use (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 031 or equivalent and MATH-M 007 or equivalent An introduction to computers and data processing. Includes the historical and current status of data processing and electronic digital computers; a survey of computer applications; foundations of computer programming; survey of programming languages. Credit cannot be given for both CSCI-C 106 and INFO-I 101. (Fall, Spring, Summer I)
  • CSCI-C 150 Procedures and Problem Solving (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 117 or higher

    A systematic examination of problem perception and problem-solving techniques with an emphasis on data processing and information systems applications. Includes the study of structured methodologies and various heuristic and algorithmic procedures. By providing training in problem solving independent of a programming language, the student will be better prepared to use these skills in programming and computer applications classes that assume their mastery. (Spring, Summer)

  • CSCI-C 201 Computer Programming II (4 cr.) P: CSCI-C 150 and MATH-M 100 or higher Computer programming, algorithm, and program structure. Computer solutions to problems. FORTRAN or Java will be the vehicle for program development. Lecture and discussion. Credit will not be given for both CSCI-C 201 and CSCI-A 201 or CSCI-C 203 or INFO-I 210, except by permission of the department. (Fall)
  • CSCI-C 203 COBOL and File Processing (4 cr.) P: CSCI-C 106 and CSCI-C 150 Computer program­ming and algorithms. Application to large file processing functions of an organization. Credit not given for both CSCI-C 203 and CSCI-C 201, or for both CSCI-C 203 and CSCI-C 303, except by permission of the department. (Occasionally)
  • CSCI-C 297 Sophomore Topics in Computer Sciences (3 cr.) P: Listed in Schedule of Classes or consent of instructor Selected topics in computer science appropriate to the student in or nearing the end of the sophomore year. Course may cover a topic selected from but not limited to the following list: programming languages, computer graphics, artificial intelligence, ethics in data processing, and database systems. May be repeated for no more than 9 credit hours. (Occasionally)
  • CSCI-C 307 Applied Programming Techniques (3 cr.) P: CSCI-C 201 or equivalent Programming techniques: data analysis, sorting and searching, use of tape and disk files, string and text manipulation. Credit cannot be given for both CSI-C 307 and INFO-I 211, except by permission. (Spring)
  • CSCI-C 311 Programming Languages (4 cr.) P: CSCI-A 302 or CSCI-C 307 or CSCI-C 320 or CSCI-A 346 Systematic approach to programming languages. Relationships among languages, properties and features of language, and the computer environment necessary to use languages. Lecture and laboratory. (Occasionally)
  • CSCI-C 320 Advanced COBOL (3 cr.) P: CSCI-C 203 A continuation and extension of COBOL syntax as taught in CSCI-C 203. Extensive use will be made of structured COBOL in the development of large programs requiring access to various file structures. (Occasionally)
  • CSCI-C 330 Object-oriented Systems Analysis and Design (3 cr.) P: CSCI-A 106 and CSCI-C 106

    This course is an introduction to object-oriented analysis and design. The course covers the foundations, methods and phases of object-oriented analysis and design in  developing an information system. Building an information system requires requirements collection, behavioral modeling and dynamic interactions in the system. A major goal of this course is to teach core concepts, modeling methods, UML diagrams and major phases of analysis and design. The topics to be introduced include methodology, object orientation, requirements collection, domain analysis, use case modeling, structural modeling and database modeling. (Fall)

  • CSCI-C 343 Data Structures (4 cr.) P: CSCI-A 302 or CSCI-C 307 or CSCI-C 320 or CSCI-A 346 Systematic study of data structures encountered in computing problems; structure and use of storage media; methods of representing structured data; and techniques for operating on data structures. Lectures and laboratory. (Occasionally)
  • CSCI-C 390 Individual Programming Laboratory (1-3 cr.) P: CSCI-A 302 or CSCI-C 307 or CSCI-C 320 or CSCI-A 346 Students will design, program, verify, and document a special project assignment selected in consultation with an instructor. This course may be taken several times up to a maximum of 6 credits. Prior to enrolling, students must arrange for an instructor to supervise their course activity. Credit not given for both CSCI-C 390 and DPIS-D 390 in excess of 6 credit hours. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
  • CSCI-C 410 Simulation and Modeling (3 cr.) P: Two semesters of programming and one semester of statistics or permission of instructor. Construction of various types of computer science models and simulations, including scheduling and forecasting, queuing, and process control. (Occasionally)
  • CSCI-C 430 Object-Oriented Systems Analysis and Design II (3 cr.) P: CSCI-C 330 and one semester of programming

    This course is the second class for object-oriented systems analysis and design. The course covers advanced topics in object-oriented systems analysis and design. The topics to be introduced include dynamic modeling, design patterns and factory method, the user interface, components and reuse, database modeling and implementation. In combination with software development tools, students will apply, in course projects, these design methods and skills to design an information system and implement important functions in the system. (Spring)

  • CSCI-C 442 Database Systems (3 cr.) P: CSCI-C 330.

    This course covers the fundamentals of database design and management focusing on the relational database model. Studetns will acquire the knowledge of database application technology; write queries by Structured Query Language (SQL); design tables via normalization; data modeling with the entity-relationship model; transform data models into a rational model. Students will learn database administration and manage multiusers in DBMS. Students will learn one popular Database Management System (DBMS) and learn Data Definition Language (DDL) for database relations. Students will also develope a database application and manage a remote database via the application. (Spring)

  • CSCI-C 445 Information Systems Design (3 cr.) P: CSCI-C 343. Concepts, theory, and practice in systems design and analysis with particular attention to current database methods and control. (Occasionally)
  • CSCI-C 446 Information Systems Development (3 cr.) P: CSCI-C 445 or consent of instructor Analysis and implementation of information systems. Hardware organization and the relationship to software constructs such as sequential versus direct access, coding and indexing strategies, inverted files, rings, trees, and multilinked structures. (Occasionally)
  • CSCI-Y 398 Internship in Professional Practice (1-6 cr.) P: sophomore standing; approval of major department. Designed to provide opportunities for students to receive credit for selected, career related, full-time or part-time work. Evaluation by employer and faculty sponsors. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
Economics (ECON)
  • ECON-E 103 Introduction to Microeconomics (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 007 or equivalent proficiency. Introduction to economic analysis. Resource allocation in market and nonmarket economics. Behavior of consumers, firms, and industries. Policy issues such as regulation of business, collective bargaining, and environmental protection. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
  • ECON-E 104 Introduction to Macroeconomics (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 007 or equivalent proficiency Introduction to aggregate economic analysis. National income and production, unemployment and inflation, international trade, and economic growth. Use of fiscal and monetary policy to control the economy. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
  • ECON-E 111 Economic History (3 cr.) A broad introductory course to the economic and business history of the United States from the time of European and African colonization of the New World to the present. Topics include: origins and evolution of capitalism; economic growth; changing relationship between labor and capital; and globalization.
  • ECON-E 270 Introduction to Statistical Theory for Economics and Business (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 118 and CSCI-A 106 Basic statistical methods. Descriptive statistics, probability estimation, hypothesis testing, and regression analysis. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
  • ECON-E 309 Topics in Economics (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 103, ECON-E 104.

    Study of a topic area in economics.  Topics will vary, intended primarily for non-majors wanting exposure to economics beyond the introductory level.  May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit hours.  Only 3 credit hours may count toward the major or minor in economics.

  • ECON-E 321 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 103, ECON-E 104. Microeconomics: the theory of demand; theory of production; pricing under conditions of competition and monopoly; allocation and pricing of resources; partial and general equilibrium theory; welfare economics. (Occasionally)
  • ECON-E 322 Theory of Income and Employment (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 103, ECON-E 104 Macroeconomics: national income accounting; theory of income, employment, and price level. Counter-cyclical and other public policy measures.
  • ECON-E 323 Urban Economics (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 103, ECON-E 104 Economic analysis of cities and regions. Growth and structure of cities. Location decisions by businesses. Topics such as transportation, housing, local public services, poverty, and pollution.
  • ECON-E 330 International Finance (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 103, ECON-E 104 Theory and determination of foreign exchange rates, mechanisms of adjustment to balance of payments disturbance, fixed versus flexible exchange rates. Monetary aspects of the adjustment mechanism. International mobility of short-term capital. International reserve supply mechanism and proposals for reform of the international monetary system.
  • ECON-E 340 Introduction to Labor Economics (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 103, ECON-E 104 Economic problems of the wage earner in modern society; structure, policies, and problems of labor organization; employer and governmental policies affecting labor relations.
  • ECON-E 350 Money and Banking (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 103, ECON-E 104 Monetary and banking system of the United States, including problems of money and prices, proper organization, functioning of commercial banking and Federal Reserve systems, monetary standards, and credit control. Recent monetary and banking trends. (Occasionally)
  • ECON-E 360 Public Finance: Survey (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 103, ECON-E 104 Major elements of taxation and public expenditures.
  • ECON-E 406 Advanced Undergraduate Seminar in Economics (2-4 cr.) Open to juniors and seniors only by special permission; preference given to superior students. Discussion of contemporary economic problems. Tutorial sections limited to 12 students each.
  • ECON-E 408 Undergraduate Readings in Economics (3 cr.) P: consent of instructor and dean two weeks prior to enrollment. Individual readings and research. Restricted to junior and senior business majors or majors in economics.
  • ECON-E 430 International Economics (3 cr.) P: BUS-G 300 or ECON-E 321 or consent of instructor Gains from trade, relation between factor rentals and goods prices, distributional effects of trade, tariff policy and quantitative interferences, trade problems of developing countries, discrimination and customs unions, balance-of-payments adjustment via prices and incomes, exchange rate policy, role of international reserves. (Occasionally)
  • ECON-E 445 Collective Bargaining: Practice and Problems (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 340 or consent of instructor Economic analysis of problems resulting from legislative and judicial efforts to determine rights, duties, and responsibilities of labor unions and employers. Development and current position of public policy in labor relations.
  • ECON-E 446 Public Policy in Labor Relations (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 340 or consent of instructor Current labor relations law as contained in the Wagner, Taft-Hartley, and Landrum-Griffin Acts; National Labor Relations Board and court decisions. (Occasionally)
  • ECON-E 447 Economics of the Labor Market (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 103, ECON-E 104 Analysis of the functioning of the U.S. labor market. Labor force concepts, unemployment, mobility, wages, and current manpower problems and policies. Analysis of wage determination, wage policy, and their interaction with institutional factors. (Occasionally)
English (ENG)
  • ENG-G 205 Introduction to the English Language (3 cr.) Acquaints the student with contemporary studies of the nature of language in general and of the English language in particular. Required of students preparing to teach English in secondary schools. Does not count toward group distribution requirements. (Fall or Spring)
  • ENG-G 207 Grammar and Usage (3 cr.) Provides students with a foundation in traditional grammar and usage. Intended primarily for students preparing to teach English in secondary schools. Does not count toward group distribution requirements. (Fall, Spring, Summer I)
  • ENG-L 101 Western World Masterpieces I (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 or equivalent Literary masterpieces from Homer to the Renaissance. (Fall, Spring, Summer I)
  • ENG-L 102 Western World Masterpieces II (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 or equivalent Literary masterpieces from the Renaissance to the present. (Fall, Spring, Summer I)
  • ENG-L 201 Special Studies in Literature (3 cr.) Reading of literary works in relation to special themes. May be repeated once for credit with a change in topic. (Fall or Spring) May be repeated once for credit with a change in topic.
  • ENG-L 202 Literary Interpretation (3 cr.) Development of critical skills essential to participation in the interpretation process. Through class discussion and focused writing assignments, introduces the premises and motives of literary analysis and critical methods associated with historical, generic, and / or cultural concerns. May be repeated once for credit by special arrangement with the Department of English. Note: Students planning to transfer to IU Bloomington should be aware that Advance College Project (ACP) ENG-L 202 will neither count toward the English major nor satisfy the intensive writing requirement at IU Bloomington. (Fall or Spring) May be repeated once for credit by special arrangement with the Department of English
  • ENG-L 203 Introduction to Drama (3 cr.) Representative groups of significant plays to acquaint students with characteristics of drama as a type of literature. (Fall or Spring)
  • ENG-L 204 Introduction to Fiction (3 cr.) Representative works of fiction: stresses structural technique in the novel, theories and kinds of fiction, and thematic scope of the novel. (Fall or Spring)
  • ENG-L 205 Introduction to Poetry (3 cr.) Kinds, conventions, and elements of poetry in a selection of poems from several historical periods. (Fall or Spring)
  • ENG-L 207 Women and Literature (3 cr.) Critical issues and methods in the study of women writers and treatment of women in British and American literature. (Occasionally)
  • ENG-L 211 English Literature to 1700 (3 cr.) Representative selections with emphasis on major writers from Beowulf to 1700. (Fall or Spring)
  • ENG-L 212 English Literature since 1700 (3 cr.) Representative selections with emphasis on major writers from 1700 to the early twenty-first century. (Fall or Spring)
  • ENG-L 295 American Film Culture (3 cr.) Film in relation to American culture and society. Topic varies. Works of literature may be used for comparison, but the main emphasis will be on film as a narrative medium and as an important element in American culture. (Occasionally)
  • ENG-L 305 Chaucer (3 cr.) Chaucer's works with special emphasis on the Canterbury Tales. (Occasionally)
  • ENG-L 308 Elizabethan Drama and Its Background (3 cr.) English drama from Middle Ages to 1642, including principal Elizabethan, Jacobean, and Caroline dramatists. (Occasionally)
  • ENG-L 311 Studies in Renaissance Literature (3 cr.) Major Renaissance writers, with special attention to the poetry. (Occasionally)
  • ENG-L 315 Major Plays of Shakespeare (3 cr.) A close reading of a representative selection of Shakespeare's major plays. (Fall or Spring)
  • ENG-L 326 Major Authors of the Eighteenth Century (3 cr.) Representative selections from the works of writers such as Dryden, Swift, Pope, and Johnson. (Occasionally)
  • ENG-L 332 Romantic Literature (3 cr.) Major Romantic writers, with emphasis on the following: Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats. (Fall or Spring)
  • ENG-L 335 Victorian Literature (3 cr.) Major poetry and prose, 1839-1900, studied against the social and intellectual background of the period. (Fall or Spring)
  • ENG-L 345 Twentieth - Century British Poetry (3 cr.) Modern poets, particularly Yeats, Eliot, and Auden; some later poets may be included. (Fall or Spring)
  • ENG-L 346 Twentieth - Century British Fiction (3 cr.) Modern fiction, its techniques and experiments, particularly Joyce, Lawrence, and Woolf; some later novelists may be included. (Fall or Spring)
  • ENG-L 347 British Fiction to 1800 (3 cr.) Forms, techniques, and theories of fiction as exemplified by such authors as Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Smollett, and Sterne. (Occasionally)
  • ENG-L 348 Nineteenth - Century British Fiction (3 cr.) Forms, techniques, and theories of fiction as exemplified by such romantic and Victorian authors as Scott, Dickens, Eliot, and Hardy. (Occasionally)
  • ENG-L 351 American Literature 1800 - 1865 (3 cr.) American writers to 1865: Emerson, Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman, and two or three additional major writers. (Fall or Spring)
  • ENG-L 352 American Literature 1865 - 1914 (3 cr.) American writers, 1865 - 1914: Mark Twain, Dickinson, James, and two or three additional major writers. (Fall or Spring)
  • ENG-L 354 American Literature since 1914 (3 cr.) American writers since 1914: Faulkner, Hemingway, Eliot, Frost, and two or three additional major writers. (Fall or Spring)
  • ENG-L 355 American Fiction to 1900 (3 cr.) Representative nineteenth - century American novels and short fiction. (Fall or Spring)
  • ENG-L 357 Twentieth - Century American Poetry (3 cr.) American poetry since 1900, including such poets as Pound, Eliot, Frost, Stevens,Williams, and Lowell. (Fall or Spring)
  • ENG-L 358 Twentieth - Century American Fiction (3 cr.) American fiction since 1900, including such writers as Dreiser, Lewis, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, and Bellow. (Fall or Spring)
  • ENG-L 364 Native American Literature (3 cr.) A survey of traditional and modern literature by American Indians, especially of the high plains and Southwest culture areas, with particular attention to the image of the Indian. (Occasionally)
  • ENG-L 365 Modern Drama: Continental (3 cr.) Special attention to such dramatists as Ibsen, Chekhov, Hauptmann, Pirandello, Brecht, and Sartre. (Occasionally)
  • ENG-L 366 Modern Drama: English, Irish, and American (3 cr.) Special attention to such dramatists as Shaw, Synge, O'Neill, Hellman, Williams, Miller, and Albee. (Occasionally)
  • ENG-L 369 Studies in British and American Authors (3 cr.) Studies in single authors (such as Wordsworth and Melville), groups of authors (such as the Pre-Raphaelites), and periods (such as American writers of the 1920s). Topics will vary from semester to semester. May be repeated once for credit. (Occasionally) May be repeated once for credit
  • ENG-L 370 Recent Black American Writing (3 cr.) A study of selected black American writers of the late-nineteenth and twentieth centuries with emphasis on very recent writing. The focus of this course will be on the literary qualities unique to those writers as individuals and as a group. Credit not given for both ENG-L 370 and AFRO-A 370. (Occasionally)
  • ENG-L 381 Recent Writing (3 cr.) Study of selected writers of contemporary significance. May include relevant groups and movements (such as black writers, poets of projective verse, new regionalists, parajournalists and other experimenters in pop literature, folk writers, and distinctively ethnic writers); several recent novelists, poets, or critics; or any combination of groups. (Occasionally)
  • ENG-L 382 Fiction of the Non-Western World (3 cr.) In-depth study of selected narratives from the fiction of the non-Western world. Focus and selections vary from year to year. (Occasionally)
  • ENG-L 390 Children's Literature (3 cr.) Historical and modern children's books and selections from books, designed to assist future teachers, parents, librarians, or others in selecting the best of children's literature for each period of the child's life. (Fall, Spring, Summer I)
  • ENG-L 391 Literature for Young Adults (3 cr.) Study of books suitable for junior high and high school classroom use. Special stress on works of fiction dealing with contemporary problems, but also including modern classics, biography, science fiction, and other areas of interest to teenage readers.
  • ENG-L 440 Senior Seminar in English and American Literature (3 cr.) Thorough study of one or more major British and American writers or of a significant theme or form in English and American literature. (Fall)
  • ENG-L 495 Individual Reading in English (1-3 cr.) P: consent of instructor and departmental chairperson May be repeated once for credit. (Occasionally) May be repeated once for credit
  • ENG-W 130 Principles of Composition (3 cr.) Placement according to IU Northwest English Placement Test. For students with significant writing problems who need an intensive, two-semester freshman writing experience. Practice in writing papers for a variety of purposes and audiences. Attention to revision and to sentence and paragraph structure. (Fall, Spring)
  • ENG-W 131 Elementary Composition I (3 cr.) Offers instruction and practice in the reading and writing skills required in college. Emphasis is on written assignments that require synthesis, analysis, and argument based on sources. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
  • ENG-W 132 Elementary Composition II (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 Continuation of ENG-W 131, with emphasis on writing from secondary sources: research, evaluating evidence, and documentation. Does not count toward group distribution requirements. (Occasionally)
  • ENG-W 231 Professional Writing Skills (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 or equivalent To develop research and writing skills requisite for most academic and professional activities. Emphasis on methods of research, organization, and writing techniques useful in preparing reviews, critical bibliographies, research and technical reports, proposals, and papers. Junior or senior standing recommended. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
  • ENG-W 233 Intermediate Expository Writing (3 cr.) This course is a logical extension of the rhetorical and stylistic principles introduced in ENG-W 131. Emphasis is on the writing process, modes of discourse reflective of professional writing, and language conventions. Does not count toward group distribution requirements. (Occasionally)
  • ENG-W 301 Writing Fiction (3 cr.) May be repeated once for credit. (Fall or Spring)
  • ENG-W 303 Writing Poetry (3 cr.) May be repeated once for credit. (Fall or Spring)
  • ENG-W 311 Non-fiction Creative Wrting (3 cr.) May be repeated once for credit. (Occasionally)
  • ENG-W 350 Advanced Expository Writing (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 or equivalent Close examination of assumptions, choices, and techniques that go into a student's own writing and the writing of others. Does not count toward group distribution requirements. (Occasionally)
  • ENG-W 398 Internship in Writing (1-3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 or equivalent Combine study of writing with practical expertise in working with professionals in journalism, business communication, or technical writing. Researched reports are required. Evaluations made by both supervisor and instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. (Fall or Spring) May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits
Fine Arts (FINA)
  • FINA-A 101 Ancient and Medieval Art (3 cr.) A survey of major styles and monuments in art and architecture from prehistoric times to the end of the Middle Ages. (Fall)
  • FINA-A 102 Renaissance through Modern Art (3 cr.) A survey of major artists, styles, and movements in European and American art and architecture from the fifteenth century to the present. (Spring)
  • FINA-A 160 Introduction to East Asian Art (3 cr.) An introduction to the art of India, Southeast Asia, China, Japan, and Korea. This course covers painting, sculpture, architecture, and other arts identified with the Far East. (Fall)
  • FINA-A 340 Topics in Modern Art (3 cr.) P: FINA-A 102 Topics rotate covering different aspects of the history and study of modern art. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (Occasionally)
  • FINA-A 341 Nineteenth-Century European Art (3 cr.) P: FINA-A 102 Survey of major artists and styles in painting and sculpture from circa 1770 to 1900, emphasizing developments in France, England, and Germany. Topics include neoclassicism, romanticism, realism, impressionism, and postimpressionism. (Fall)
  • FINA-A 342 Twentieth-Century Art (3 cr.) P: FINA A102 Survey of major artists, styles, and movements in painting and sculpture from 1900 to the present in Europe and the United States. Topics include expressionism, cubism, futurism, dada, surrealism, and abstraction. (Spring)
  • FINA-A 383 Contemporary Art (3 cr.) This course will survey art from the 1970s to the present. Classroom lectures, museum gallery visits will be a part of the course. (Spring)
  • FINA-A 396 Foreign Study in History of Art (1-9 cr.) Intended only for students participating in IU Overseas Study Program; all fine arts majors are required to obtain prior approval from undergraduate history of art advisor. May be repeated for a total of 9 credit hours. (Occasionally during Summer)
  • FINA-A 435 Art Theory—Seniors (2 cr.) P: two 100- level Art History courses This course is designed to cover broad-ranging concerns vital to the art major's continuing career in graduate school and the professional art world. Open to seniors only. (Fall)
  • FINA-A 495 Readings and Research in Art History (1-4 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. This course is reserved for students wishing to pursue undergraduate research.  Arrangements are made with faculty supervisor.  Individual study.  May be repeated for a total of 8 credits. (Occasionally)
  • FINA-D 317 Video Art (3 cr.) Techniques of generating and editing digital imagery, sound and video.  Students apply concepts to non-linear digital editing systems while learning a new visual vocabulary.  Class also covers special effects, animation programs, and the aesthetics of time based media.  (Occasionally)
  • FINA-F 100 Fundamental Studio—Drawing (3 cr.) Development of visual awareness and coordination of perceptual and manual skills; seeing, representing, and inventing on an experimental, exploratory level in two dimensions. Includes placement, scale, volume, light, formal articulation, and investigations of color theory. (Spring)
  • FINA-F 101 Fundamental Studio-3D (3 cr.) Volume, space, material, and physical force studies provide the basis for exploration of three-dimensional form; includes carving, construction, modeling. (Fall)
  • FINA-F 102 Fundamental Studio-2D (3 cr.) Color, shape, line, and value structures are studied as the basis for exploration of two-dimensional spatial relationships; includes investigation of conventional and invented tools and media. (Spring)
  • FINA-H 100 Art Appreciation (3 cr.)

    To acquaint students with outstanding works of art and to provide an approach to appreciation through knowledge of purpose, techniques, form, and content.  (Occasionally)

  • FINA-S 200 Drawing I (3 cr.) Preliminary course for advancement in drawing, stressing visual awareness; seeing, representing, and technical command on a two-dimensional surface. Problems in handling placement, scale, space, volume, light, and formal articulation. (Fall, Spring)
  • FINA-S 230 Painting I (3 cr.) Preliminary course for advancement in painting; exploring technical and visual aspects of color media. Emphasis on media command and structural problems in painting. Media: oil and acrylics. (Fall, Spring)
  • FINA-S 240 Basic Printmaking Media (3 cr.) Introduction to printmaking. Emphasis on relief. Problems in pictorial composition and drawing stressed. (Fall, Spring)
  • FINA-S 250 Introduction to Design Practice (3 cr.) P: CSCI-A 106. Visual communication emphasizing the perceptive use of line, interval, proportion, color, sequence, and grid systems. Basic tools and drawing disciplines of graphic design. (Fall, Spring)
  • FINA-S 260 Ceramics I (3 cr.) A limited introduction to handbuilding, throwing, glaze mixing, glaze application, including a few lectures on basic ceramic techniques. (Fall, Spring, Summer I)
  • FINA-S 270 Sculpture I (3 cr.) The study of the relationships of volume and space through modeling, carving, and construction. (Fall, Spring)
  • FINA-S 291 Fundamentals of Photography (3 cr.) Basic practice of camera operations; exposure calculation; and exposing, printing, and enlarging monochrome photographs. Guidance toward establishment of a personal photographic aesthetic. (Fall, Spring, Summer I)
  • FINA-S 301 Drawing II (3 cr.) P: FINA-S 200 or consent of instructor. Intermediate course in drawing from the model and other sources. Emphasis on technical command of the media in conjunction with the development of a visual awareness.Continued problems in the articulation of space, scale, volume, and linear sensitivity.  May be repeated once. (Fall, Spring)
  • FINA-S 331 Painting II (3 cr.) P: FINA S230 or consent of instructor. Intermediate course in painting from the model and other sources. Emphasis on technical command and understanding of the components of painting space, color, volume, value, and scale. Media: oil or acrylics. May be repeated once. (Fall, Spring)
  • FINA-S 337 Watercolor Painting I (3 cr.)  An introduction to watercolor working from still life, portrait, and figure, stressing technical competence. (Occasionally)
  • FINA-S 344 Printmaking II Silkscreen (3 cr.) P: FINA-S 340. Advanced study with emphasis on silkscreen. Problems in pictorial composition and drawing stressed.  May be repeated once. (Fall, Spring)
  • FINA-S 351 Typography 1 (3 cr.) P: FINA-S 250 or consent of instructor. Further studies in visual communication concentrating on letter drawing, symbolic drawing, and typographic exploration. Production methods. (Fall)
  • FINA-S 352 Graphic Design III (3 cr.) P: FINA-S 351 or consent of instructor. Advanced studies in visual problem solving relating to the development of symbols and their integration with typographic communication, photography, and design-oriented drawing. (Fall)
  • FINA-S 353 Graphic Design IV (3 cr.) P: FINA-S 352 or consent of instructor. Using a variety of media to communicate messages, students apply processes from printing to multimedia as appropriate for directed projects. (Occasionally)
  • FINA-S 361 Ceramics II (3 cr.) P: FINA-S 260 or consent of instructor. Continued practice in forming and glazing Lectures. (Fall, Spring)
  • FINA-S 371 Sculpture II (3 cr.) P: FINA-S 270 or consent of instructor. Continuation of basic studies, using both figurative (modeling from human figure in clay) and abstract means (constructions in metal, wood, and plaster). Concentration on manipulative and technical skills and more complex materials.  May be repeated once. (Fall, Spring)
  • FINA-S 392 Intermediate Photography (3 cr.) P: FINA-S 291 or consent of instructor. Practice of photography applied to student's major study or area of special interest in the humanities and social sciences. (Fall, Spring)
  • FINA-S 400 Independent Studio Projects (1-6 cr.) P: FINA 300-level studio course. Designed for advanced studio art students who want to work independently on special studio projects under the guidance of a faculty member or committee. This course work does not fulfill a specific course requirement for fine arts major. It does count within the 25-34 credit hour studio art limit. Students must arrange a project with a faculty member who will supervise and grade the work produced. One credit is given for each three hours of work per week for the entire semester.  Repeatable up to 6 credits. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
  • FINA-S 401 Drawing III (1-6 cr.) P: junior/senior standing, FINA-S 301. Advanced drawing. Continuation of FINA S301. (Fall, Spring) May be repeated up to a total of 20 credit hours.
  • FINA-S 413 Typography (2 cr.) P: FINA-S 351. Studies in graphic design concentrating on typography as it relates to other design elements in practical design application. (Occasionally)
  • FINA-S 414 Layout and Design (2 cr.) P: FINA-S 351. Students in graphic design concentrating on layout as it relates to other publication design. (Occasionally)
  • FINA-S 415 Package Design (2 cr.) P: FINA-S 351. Studies in graphic design concentrating on package design. (Occasionally)
  • FINA-S 420 Topics in Studio Art (3 cr.) P: junior standing or consent of instructor. May be repeated up to a total of 20 credit hours.  A multidisciplinary studio course that explores topics through the use of a variety of artistic approaches. Students will work in the media of their choice. (Occasionally)
  • FINA-S 431 Painting III (1-6 cr.) P: junior standing, FINA-S 331. Advanced course in painting. Continuation of FINA 5331. (Fall, Spring) May be repeated up to a total of 20 credit hours.
  • FINA-S 444 Printmaking III Silk Screen (1-6 cr.) P: FINA-S 344. Advanced work in silkscreen for qualified students.(Fall, Spring) May be repeated for a total of 20 credit hours.
  • FINA-S 451 Graphic Design Problem Solving (1-6 cr.) P: FINA-S 352 and consent of instructor. Professional problem solving in graphic design. Using a variety of media to communicate messages, students apply processes from printing to multimedia as appropriate for directed projects. (Occasionally) May be repeated for a total of 20 credit hours.
  • FINA-S 461 Ceramics III (1-6 cr.) P: junior/senior standing, FINA-S 361. Further practice in ceramic studio techniques. Body preparation. Lectures. (Fall, Spring) May be repeated up to a total of 20 credit hours.
  • FINA-S 471 Sculpture III (3-6 cr.) P: junior/senior standing. Concentration on construction, carving, welding, and figure modeling. Concentration will be on foundry techniques each spring semester. (Fall, Spring) May be repeated for a total of 20 credit hours.
  • FINA-S 490 Advanced Photography I (3 cr.) P: junior/senior standing, FINA-S 392 or consent of instructor. (Fall, Spring, Summer I) May be repeated up to a total of 20 credit hours.
  • FINA-S 491 Advanced Photography II (1-6 cr.) P: junior/senior standing, FINA-S 490 or consent of instructor. (Fall, Spring, Summer I) May be repeated up to a total of 20 credit hours.
  • FINA-S 497 Independent Study in Fine Arts (1-6 cr.) P: majors only, senior standing Creative projects and senior exhibition in the student's area of practice. Course requires a section authorization form. (Spring)
French (FREN)
  • FREN-F 100 Elementary French I (4 cr.) Introduction to French language and selected aspects of French civilization and culture. (Fall, Spring, Summer I)
  • FREN-F 150 Elementary French II (4 cr.) P: FREN F100 or equivalent Introduction to French language and selected aspects of French civilization and culture. (Fall, Spring, Summer II)
  • FREN-F 200 Second-Year French I: Language and Culture (3 cr.) P: FREN F150 or equivalent. Grammar, composition, conversation coordinated with the study of cultural texts. (Fall, Spring)
  • FREN-F 250 Second-Year French II: Language and Culture (3 cr.) P: FREN F200 or equivalent. Grammar, composition, conversation coordinated with the study of cultural texts. (Fall, Spring)
  • FREN-F 300 Lectures et analyses litteraires (3 cr.) P: FREN F250. Preparation for more advanced work in French or Francophone literature. Readings and discussion of one play, one novel, short stories, and poems as well as the principles of literary criticism and explication de texte. (Spring)
  • FREN-F 305 Theatre et essai (3 cr.) P: FREN F250 or equivalent. Drama and literature of ideas. Dramatists such as Corneille, Racine, Moliere, Beaumarchais, and Sartre; essayists and philosophers such as Descartes, Pascal, Voltaire, Diderot, and Camus. (Spring)
  • FREN-F 306 Roman et poesie (3 cr.) P: FREN F250 or equivalent. Novel and poetry. Novelists such as Balzac, Flaubert, and Proust; readings in anthologies stressing sixteenth-, nineteenth-, and twentieth- century poetry. (Spring)
  • FREN-F 310 Topics in French Literature in Translation (3 cr.) Readings in English translation of novels, plays, essays, and poetry or other works that reflect a specific topic chosen by the instructor. May be repeated once for credit with a different topic.  No credit in French. (Occasionally)
  • FREN-F 311 Contemporary French Civilization (3 cr.) Political, social, and cultural aspects of contemporary France. No credit in French. (Occasionally)
  • FREN-F 312 Readings in French Literature in Translation (3 cr.) Representative readings emphasizing a particular author, genre, or topic in French literature. Subject may vary with each listing and is identified in the Schedule of Classes. No credit in French. (Occasionally)
  • FREN-F 328 Advanced French Grammar and Composition (3 cr.) P: FREN F250 or equivalent. Study and practice of French thinking and writing patterns. (Fall)
  • FREN-F 341 Topics in Francophone Culture (3 cr.) Topics in Francophone culture will be explored from a variety of perspectives.  The course will be given in English.  May be repeated once for credit with a different topic.  No credit in French.  (Occasionally)
  • FREN-F 375 Themes et perspectives litteraires et culturels (3 cr.) Study of a subject or topic in French (cultural or literary).  All work in French.  May be repeated once for credit. (Occasionally)
  • FREN-F 380 French Conversation (3 cr.) P: FREN F250 or equivalent. For nonnative speakers of French. Designed to develop conversational skills through reports, debates, and group discussions with an emphasis on vocabulary building, mastery of syntax, and general oral expression. Both FREN F380 and FREN F480 may be taken for credit. (Fall)
  • FREN-F 391 Studies in the French Film (3 cr.) Analysis of major French art form, introduction to modern French culture seen through the medium of film art, and the study of relationship to cinema and literature in France and the Francophone world. Films shown in French with English subtitles. Class taught in French.
  • FREN-F 424 Comedie classique (3 cr.) P: 6 credit hours at 300 level, including FREN F305 or FREN F306. Moliere, Marivaux, Beaumarchais, and others. (Occasionally)
  • FREN-F 441 Literature and Culture of the Francophone World (3 cr.) This course investigates the cultures of French-speaking Africa, the Caribbean, and Asia. Literary, cultural, and visual works will be explored. Subjects covered include the search for identity; the challenges of colonialism and acculturation; writing for social change; class, gender and social status; local traditions versus global modernity. Taught in French.
  • FREN-F 443 Nineteenth-Century Novel I (3 cr.) P: 6 credit hours at 300 level, including FREN F305 or FREN F306. Introduction to French language and selected aspects of French civilization and culture. (Fall, Spring, Summer I)
  • FREN-F 450 Colloquium in French Studies (3-9 cr.) P: 6 credits at 300 level, including FREN F305 or FREN F306 or consent of the instructor. Emphasis on one topic, author, or genre. (Occasionally)
  • FREN-F 452 Civilisation et litterature quebecoises (3 cr.) P: 6 credits at 300 level, including FREN F305 or FREN F306. The objective of this course is to acquaint students with Quebec literature and civilization from its origins to the present. Emphasis on the events leading to the "Quiet Revolution" and on contemp­orary poetry, fiction, drama, and film. (Occasionally)
  • FREN-F 453 Literature contemporaine I (3 cr.) P: 6 credit hours at 300 level, including FREN F305 or FREN F306. Twentieth-century French literature until 1940. (Occasionally)
  • FREN-F 463 Civilization francaise I (3 cr.) P: 6 credit hours in French at the 300 level or departmental permission. French civilization from the medieval period through the seventeenth century. Readings in French. Eligible for graduate credit. (Occasionally)
  • FREN-F 464 Civilization francaise II (3 cr.) P: 6 credit hours in French at the 300 level or departmental permission. French civilization from the eighteenth century to the contemporary period. Readings in French. Eligible for graduate credit. (Occasionally)
  • FREN-F 480 French Conversation (3 cr.) P: FREN F380 or consent of department for nonnative speakers of French. Class designed to develop conversational skills. Includes reviews, presentations, and discussion. Places responsibility on the student for contributing to the animation and interest of the class. Essentially a performing class. Supplemental work is required beyond FREN F380. (Occasionally)
  • FREN-F 495 Individual Readings in French Literature (1-3 cr.) P: Consent of department. May be repeated. (Fall, Spring)
Geography (GEOG)
  • GEOG-G 107 Physical Systems of the Environment (3 cr.) Introduction to the physical principles governing the geographical distribution and interrelationships of the earth's physical features (atmosphere and oceans, landforms, soils, vegetation, plate tectonics, and the rock cycle). The course provides students with the background necessary to evaluate current environmental issues. (Occasionally)
  • GEOG-G 110 Introduction to Human Geography (3 cr.) An introduction to geographic perspectives and principles through a consideration of six themes: environmental perception, diffusion, regionalization, spatial distribution, spatial interaction of populations, and location theory. Themes are illustrated using examples such as pollution, population problems, and urbanization. (Fall, Spring)
  • GEOG-G 114 Dinosaurs and their relatives (3 cr.)

    Origin and evelution of vertebrates including dinosaurs and their distant relatives, such as fish, amphibians, birds and mammals. Course will focus on dinosaur evolution, paleobiology, paleoecology, and extinction. The scientific method, and quantitative and qualitative methodologies will be presented. Two lectures and one demonstration each week. (Occasionally)

  • GEOG-G 120 World Regional Geography—Topic: Geography of the Middle East (3 cr.) Analysis of population, culture, environment, and economics of major world regions. Examination of issues of global importance, including development, demographic change, urbanization and migration, and international conflict.
  • GEOG-G 213 Introduction to Economic Geography (3 cr.) P: ECON E103 or GEOG G110. Principles of economic geography including theories concerning industrial location, competition for land, economic nature of resources, and geographic background of interregional trade. (Occasionally)
  • GEOG-G 250 Computer Methods in Geography (3 cr.) P: GEOG G110. Introduction to computing in geography, emphasizing practical applications. Topics include programming concepts, analysis of spatial data, and graphics. Numerous exercises give practical experience with the analysis and interpretation of geographic data. GIS programs will be emphasized. (Fall)
  • GEOG-G 304 Meteorology and Physical Climatology (3 cr.) Fundamental atmospheric properties and interrelationships. Radiation theory, components of energy and moisture balance, atmospheric circulation, upper air-surface relationships, and global weather systems. (Occasionally)
  • GEOG-G 313 Political Geography (3 cr.) P: 3 credit hours of geography or advanced courses in history or political science or special permission. Geographical influences which have affected development of political units, such as nations, states, and parties, as background for better understanding of current events. (Occasionally)
  • GEOG-G 314 Urban Geography (3 cr.) R: 3 credit hours of geography or special permission. Principles of location and distribution of urban centers, urban land use, geographical aspects of city planning. (Occasionally)
  • GEOG-G 315 Environmental Conservation (3 cr.) R: junior standing. Conservation of natural resources including soil, water, wildlife, and forests as interrelated components of the environment emphasizing an ecological approach. Current problems relating to environmental quality. (Spring)
  • GEOG-G 327 Geography of Indiana (3 cr.) P: GEOG G110 or consent of the instructor. A geographical analysis of the state of Indiana. Emphasis placed on the interrelationship of the state's physical and human geography. (Occasionally)
  • GEOG-G 425 Africa: Contemporary Geographical Problems (3 cr.)

    This course examines contemporary geographic problems confronting the countris of sub-Saharan Africa. Primarily focus on urbanization, rural-urban migration, unemployment, agriculture, and health care. Also analysis of terrain, resource base, and other aspects of the natural environment. (Spring and Fall)

  • GEOG-G 476 Climate Change Science (3 cr.)

    Evidence for and theories of climate change over a range of time scales. Sources of natural climate forcing are presented, historical evolution of climate change is quantified, and model tools and climate projections are presented along with analyses of climate change impacts. (Occasionally)

Geology (GEOL)
  • GEOL-G  101 Introduction to Earth Science: Lecture (3 cr.) Origin and classification of minerals and rocks. Gradation processes and landform evolution. Atmosphere and weather. Geologic time and earth history. Earth resources. Two lectures each week. Credit is given for only one of the following: GEOL101, GEOL107. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
  • GEOL-G  102 Introduction to Earth Science Laboratory (1 cr.) P: Any 100-level GEOL (geology) lecture-based course. Classification and identification of minerals, rocks, and fossils. Weather and climates. Map projections, maps, and local topography. One laboratory each week. (Fall, Spring, Occasionally Summer)
  • GEOL-G  107 Environmental Geology (3 cr.) An introduction to geology through discussion of geological topics that show the influence of geology on modern society. Topics include mineral and energy resources, water resources, geologic hazards and problems, geology and health, and land use. Credit given for only one of the following: GEOL101, or GEOL107. (see schedule of classes for offerings).
  • GEOL-G  108 Selected Earth Science Topics (1-3 cr.) Selected topics of general interest in earth science offered as individual units. Consult Schedule of Classes for current offerings. (Occasionally)
  • GEOL-G  185 Global Environmental Change (3 cr.) The scientific basis behind natural and human-based global environmental changes. Geological perspective of the formation of the earth. Human activities influencing the natural system, including population, deforestation, water usage, acid rain, ozone depletion, smog and global warming. Subsequent human reactions. (see schedule of classes for offerings).
  • GEOL-G  209 History of Earth (4 cr.) P: Any 100-level lecture-based geology course and G102. Earth history emphasizing physical and biological evolution. Geologic time, stratigraphic correlation, plate tectonics, paleodepositional environments, paleo­graphy, and evolution of life. Laboratory, field trip required. (Spring)
  • GEOL-G  210 Oceanography (3 cr.) P: One college-level science course or consent of the instructor. Introduction to the study of the oceans and marine processes. Emphasis on morphology of the ocean floor, life in the ocean, oceanic circulation, and submarine geology. Three lectures or two lectures with occasional laboratory per week. (Occasionally)
  • GEOL-G  220 Regional Geology Field Trip (3 cr.) P: Any 100-level geology course; or consent of instructor. Field investigation of selected regions of North America. Six to 15 days in the field. (Spring or Summer)
  • GEOL-G  221 Introductory Mineralogy (4 cr.) P: any 100-level lecture-based geology course and G102. C: College-level course in chemistry, or permission of instructor. Crystallography: morphology, classes, twinning habit. Physical and chemical mineralogy. Description, identification, association, occurrence, and use of common and important minerals. Two lectures and one laboratory each week. Required field trip. (Three semester rotation: Fall 2014, Spring 2016, Fall 2017, Spring 2019)
  • GEOL-G  222 Introduction to Petrology (4 cr.) P: GEOL G221. Dynamic processes that form igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks: Focus on composition, field occurrence, characteristics, classification, origin, laboratory description, and identification. Two lectures and one laboratory each week. Required field trip.  This class meets the intensiver writing require for the IUNorthwest campus. (Three semester rotation: Spring 2015, Fall 2016, Spring 2018, Fall 2019)
  • GEOL-G  317 Field and Laboratory Techniques (3-5 cr.) P: GEOL G101, GEOL G102. Field trips mandatory. A field and laboratory-based course. Content includes map construction, reading, and interpretation, surveying, computer graphics, aerial photography interpretation, lithostratigraphic logging of sediment and bedrock, stream gauging, statistical analysis of geological data, grain size analysis, and an instruction to GIS and remote sensing. (Summer or Fall-even years)
  • GEOL-G  323 Structural Geology (4 cr.) P: GEOL G222 and a course in trigonometry, precalculus or calculus, or consent of the instructor. Nature and origin of structural features of the earth's crust, with emphasis on mechanics of deformation. Two lectures and one laboratory each week. Required field trip. (Normally a three semester rotation. Following is the schedule through 2018:  Fall 2014, Fall 2015, Spring 2017, Fall 2018)
  • GEOL-G  334 Principles of Sedimentology and Stratigraphy (4 cr.) P: GEOL G221 or consent of instructor. Interrelationship of sedimentation and stratigraphy; process and factors influencing genesis of sedimentary strata; provenance, depositional environment, sedimentary facies, paleoecology; analytical techniques; application of principles to interpretation of stratigraphic record. Required field trip. Two lectures and one laboratory each week. (Fall—even years)
  • GEOL-G  406 Introduction to Geochemistry (3 cr.) P: CHEM C106, GEOL G222, MATH M216, or consent of instructor. Application of chemical principles in study of the earth from primarily dynamic approach. Two lectures each week. (Occasionally)
  • GEOL-G  407 Senior Geosciences Projects I (4 cr.) P: Senior standing in geosciences. Field and/or laboratory research project in geosciences, under faculty or faculty committee supervision. A preliminary report must be submitted at the end of the first semester, and a final report at the end of the second. Each must be written in proper scientific form. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
  • GEOL-G  408 Senior Geosciences Projects II (4 cr.) P: Senior standing in geosciences. Field and/or laboratory research project in geosciences, under faculty or faculty committee supervision. A preliminary report must be submitted at the end of the first semester, and a final report at the end of the second. Each must be written in proper scientific form. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
  • GEOL-G  410 Undergraduate Research in Geology (1-4 cr.) P: Junior standing and consent of advisor. Field and laboratory research in selected problems in geology. Total of 6 credit hours may be counted toward the degree in geology. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
  • GEOL-G  413 Introduction to Earth Physics (3 cr.) P: GEOL G323, PHYS P202 or PHYS P222. P or C: MATH M216 or consent of instructor. Physics in the study of the earth: its origin, history, internal constitution, structure, and mineral resources. (Occasionally)
  • GEOL-G  415 Geomorphology (4 cr.) P: GEOL G222 or consent of instructor. Geomorphic processes, evolution and classification of landforms. Laboratory: topographic, geologic, and soil maps; aerial photographs. Required field trip. Two lectures and one laboratory each week. (Fall odd years)
  • GEOL-G  420 Regional Geology Field Trip (1-3 cr.) P: 10 credit hours of geology and consent of instructor. Field investigations of selected regions of North America for study of mineralogic, lithologic, stratigraphic, structural, paleontologic, geomorphic, or other geological relationships. Six to 15 days in the field. May be repeated. Usually follows spring semester. (Spring or Summer, Occasionally)
  • GEOL-G  435 Glacial and Quaternary Geology (3-4 cr.) P: GEOL G222. Topics include glacier processes, glacial sediments, glacial landforms, glacial history, and interpretations of climate change from the glacial record. The focus is on glaciation during the Quaternary Period with specific emphasis on glacial history and landforms of Northwest Indiana. Two lectures and one laboratory are required each week. (Occasionally)
  • GEOL-G  451 Principles of Hydrogeology (4 cr.) P: GEOL G334 or consent of instructor. Water resources: occurrence, regulation, and management of water; hydrologic cycle, water movement, well hydraulics; water quality and pollution; surface and subsurface investigations; basin-wide development of water resources; legal aspects; relationship of hydrogeology to engineering geology. Two lectures and one laboratory are required each week. (Spring odd years)
  • GEOL-G  460 Internship in Geology (3 cr.) P: Geology major with senior standing and approval from the chair. Industrial or similar experiences in geologically oriented employment. Projects jointly arranged, coordinated, and evaluated by faculty and industrial/ governmental supervisors. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
  • GEOL-G  476 Climate Change Science (3 cr.) Evidence for and theories of climate change over a range of time scales. Sources of natural climate forcing are presented, historical evolution of climate change is quantified, and model tools and climate projections are presented along with analyses of climate change impacts. (Occasionally)
  • GEOL-G  490 Undergradute Seminar (1-2 cr.) Open to junior and senior majors by special permission. Readings and discussion of selected topics. May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credit hours. (see schedule of classes for offerings)
  • GEOL-T 315 North American Landscape (3 cr.) P: Course in physical or general geology. Gives the student an elementary understanding of various geologic controls and processes that have produced the topographic features. Regional concept stressed rather than individual landforms. The continent is divided into geomorphic regions based on similar geologic controls and geomorphic histories. (Occasionally)
German (GER)
  • GER-G 100 Beginning German I (4 cr.) Introduction to present-day German and to selected aspects of German culture. Survey of the language: structure and meaning. Introduction to German grammatical forms and their function. Development of listening comprehension, simple speaking proficiency, controlled reading and writing skills. (Fall)
  • GER-G 150 Beginning German II (4 cr.) P: GER G100 or equivalent Introduction to present-day German and to selected aspects of German culture. Survey of the language: structure and meaning. Introduction to German grammatical forms and their function. Development of listening comprehension, simple speaking proficiency, controlled reading and writing skills. (Spring)
  • GER-G 200 Oral Practice, Writing, and Reading I (3 cr.) P: GER G150 or equivalent. Further development of oral and written command of language structures. Reading of literary and nonliterary texts. (Fall)
  • GER-G 250 Oral Practice, Writing, and Reading II (3 cr.) P: GER G200 or equivalent. Review of selected grammatical items. Reading of modern German prose and plays with stress on discussion in German. Writing of descriptive and expository prose based on the reading material. (Spring)
History (HIST)
  • HIST-A 301 Colonial and Revolutionary America I (3 cr.) Possible themes for this course include the development of British North America, the colonial origins of the revolutionary struggle in America, and an exploration of the American Revolutionary era, 1765 to 1789. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-A 303 The United States, 1789-1865 (3 cr.) This course will examine the early American republic, beginning with the Constitutional Convention and ending with the conclusion of the Mexican-American War. Topics that will be explored include the early development of the American government, the rise of partisanship and democracy, social and economic developments, slavery, and westward expansion. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-A 313 Origins of Modern America, 1865-1917 (3 cr.) Social, economic, cultural, and political ways in which Americans accommodated and resisted changes introduced by large-scale industrialization. Populism and progressivism receive special attention. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-A 314 United States, 1917-1945 (3 cr.) Political, demographic, economic, and intellectual transformation during World War I, the twentieis, the Great Depression, and World War II. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-A 315 Recent U.S. History (3 cr.) Political, demographic, economic, and intellectual transformation after World War II, with special emphasis on the 1950s. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-A 317 American Social History, 1865 to Present (3 cr.) Development of modern American social and intellectual patterns since 1880. Social thought, literature, science, arts, religion, morals, education. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-A 318 The American West (3 cr.) Western expansion and development 1763-1900: economic, political, and social changes. Special attention to natural resources, Indian-white relations, and the role of the West in American myth and symbology. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-A 321 American Social History, 1865 to Present (3 cr.) Ideas that have influenced American history. From the image of New World to challenge of Jacksonian democracy. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-A 346 American Diplomatic History (3 cr.) Foundations and evolution of American foreign policy with particular emphasis on the role of the United States as a world power in the twentieth centure. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-A 347 American Urban History (3 cr.) Development of cities and processes of urbanization in United States history. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-A 348 Civil War and Reconstruction (3 cr.) Crisis of the Union; social, political, economic, and cultural factors leading to war and their influence in the war. Reconstruction and its consequences in the South and in the nation. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-A 352 History of Latinos in the United States (3 cr.) Latino experience in the United States; economic and social factors of the Latino role in a non-Latino nation.  (may be cross-listed with CHRI-C 352) (Fall)
  • HIST-A 355 Afro-American History I (3 cr.) History of blacks in the United States. Slavery, abolitionism. Reconstruction, post-Reconstruction to 1900. (may be cross-listed with AFRO-A 355) (Fall)
  • HIST-A 356 Afro-American History II (3 cr.) History of blacks in the United States from 1900 to present. Migration north, NAACP, Harlem Renaissance, postwar freedom movement. (may be cross-listed with AFRO-A 356) (Spring)
  • HIST-A 363 Survey of Indiana History (3 cr.) A survey of Indiana history and culture from the original inhabitants to recent times, with emphasis on the growth of a distinctive Hoosier culture. (Fall and Spring)
  • HIST-A 369 Issues in Early United States History (3 cr.) Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems in United States history to 1870. Topics will vary. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-A 382 The Sixties (3 cr.) An intensive examination of the decade that tore apart post-World War II American society, beginning with the confident liberalism that believed the nation could "pay any price" and "bear any burden" in order to stop communism abroad and to promote reform at home, focusing on the internal contradictions and external challenges that destroyed this liberal agenda (civil rights and black power, the New Left, the counterculture, second-wave feminism, the sexual revolution, the Vietnam War, and the globalization of the economy), and finishing with the more conservative order that emerged in the early 1970s to deal with the conflicting realities of limited national power and wealth on the one hand, and rising demands for rights and opportunities on the other. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-A 391 History of Chicanos and Puerto Ricans in the U.S. I (3 cr.) Analysis of the historical experiences of Chicanos and Puerto Ricans in American society from colonial times to 1900. Focuses on original Spanish settlements; colonial and Mexican societies; Mexican-American War; processes of subordination and proletarianization; development of Mexican culture in the United States; and the Spanish-American War.  ( may be cross-listed with CHRI-C 391) (Occasionally)
  • HIST-A 392 History of Chicanos and Puerto Ricans in the U.S. II (3 cr.) Analysis of the historical experiences of Chicanos and Puerto Ricans in American society from 1900 to present. Focuses on issues of immigration and migration; continued subordination; social and cultural adaptation; and political protest and organization.  (may be cross-listed with CHRI-C 392) (Occasionally)
  • HIST-A 446 Mexican and Puerto Rican Immigration and Migration (3 cr.) Study of the migration of Mexicans and Puerto Ricans to the United States. Emphasis will be on push-pull factors of migration, the incorporation of both groups into the American socioeconomic structure, the role of federal legislation in patterns of migration, and the special plight of undocumented workers. (may be cross-listed with CHRI-C 446) (Occasionally)
  • HIST-B 200 Issues in Western European History (3 cr.) Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems across more than one period of Western European history. Topics vary but usually cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-B 300 Issues in Western European History (3 cr.) Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems across more than one period of Western European history.  Topics vary, but usually cut across fields, regions, and periods.  May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-B 304 Postwar European Youth (3 cr.) In the period following the Second World War European society was rapidly remade, granting greater social, cultural, and economic autonomy to young people.  Young people in Britain, France, the Germanys, and the Soviet Union created new identities for themselves that illustrated the convergence of culture and politics.  This course explores the experiences of young people in the postwar era to gauge the broader transformations in contemporary European life. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-B 346 The Crusades (3 cr.) Christian military expeditions authorized by the popes between 1095 and 1500.  An exploration of the concept of holy war, the military campaigns, the crusades ideal, the crusaders motivations, women's involvement, life in the crusader states, cultural exchanges between Muslims, Christians, and Jews, and the modern legacy of the crusades.(Occasionally)
  • HIST-B 351 Western Europe in the Early Middle Ages (3 cr.) Evolution of European civilization from the fall of Rome, development of Christianity, and the Germanic invasions through Charlemagne's Empire and the subsequent development of feudalism, manorialism, papacy, and Romanesque architecture. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-B 352 Western Europe in the High Middle Ages (3 cr.) Expansion of European culture and institutions: chivalry, Crusades, rise of towns, universities, Gothic architecture, law, revival of central government. Violent changes in late-medieval Europe: overpopulation, plague, Hundred Years' War, peasant revolt, crime, inquisition, and heresy. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-B 356 French Revolution and Napoleon (3 cr.) Crisis of the Old Regime; middle class and popular revolt; constitutional monarchy to Jacobin commonwealth; the Terror and revolutionary government; expansion of Revolution in Europe; rise and fall of the Napoleonic Empire. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-B 357 Modern France (3 cr.) A social, political, and cultural survey of France in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-B 359 Europe from Napoleon to the First World War (3 cr.) Vienna settlement and period of reaction in Europe; liberalism and nationalism; revolutions; industrial revolution; capitalism; socialist movements; unification of Italy and Germany; clericalism and anticlericalism; struggles for political democracy; social legislation; imperialism, nationalist rivalries, and background of World War I. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-B 361 Europe in the Twentieth Century I (3 cr.) Diplomatic, economic, intellectual, military, political, and social developments within Europe from World War I to present; changing relationships between Europe and other parts of the world. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-B 391 Themes in World History (3 cr.) Contemporary bibliography and interpretations of major problems in world history. (Fall and Spring)
  • HIST-C 300 Issues in Classical and Byzantine History (3 cr.) Study and analysis of the history of Greece or Rome, the history of Late Antiquity in the Greco-Roman world, or of the Byzantine Empire.  Topics will vary in focus, region, and period.  May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-C 386 Greek History (3 cr.) Political, social, and economic developments in Greek world from age of Mycenae and Troy until Roman conquest (167 B.C.). Greek colonial world, Athens, and Sparta, career and legend of Alexander the Great, the Hellenistic Age. Archaeology as a source for political and social history. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-C 388 Roman History (3 cr.) History of Roman people, from legendary origins to death of Justinian (A.D. 565), illustrating development from city-state to world empire. Evolutionary stages exemplify transition from early kingship to republican forums, finally replaced by monarchy of distinctively Roman type. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-D 310 Russian Revolutions and the Soviet Regime (3 cr.) Russia on the eve of World War I; revolutions that have swept Russia; principal developments in government, economy, cultural and social life, and international policy under the Communist regime; expansion of Russian and Communist power, particularly since 1945. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-F 301 History of Puerto Rico (3 cr.) Colonization by Spain; international development; Spanish-American War; occupation by United States; economic, social, and political development; migration to the mainland; debate on independence, autonomy, and statehood.  (may be cross-listed with CHRI-C 301) (Occasionally)
  • HIST-F 444 History of Mexico (3 cr.) Brief survey of the colonial period and independence movement. Ideological conflicts within the republic. Revolution of 1910. Relation with United States from Mexican viewpoint.  (may be cross-listed with CHRI-C 444) (Occasionally)
  • HIST-G 200 Issues in Asian History (3 cr.) Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import.  Topics vary from semester to semester but usually are broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods.  May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (Fall and Spring)
  • HIST-G 369 Modern Japan (3 cr.) Western impact and social and intellectual change in late Tokugawa Japan from about 1720. The Meiji Restoration. State capitalism and the Japanese development process. Empire, war defeat, U.S. occupation, and renewal in the twentieth century. Japan's rise to the front rank of world economic powers after World War II. (Fall and Spring)
  • HIST-G 385 Modern China (3 cr.) A survey of the final century of dynastic rule and the rise to power of the Nationalist and Communist parties, highlighting social and cultural developments, the impact of Western imperialism, and the evolution of revolutionary ideologies. (Fall and Spring)
  • HIST-G 387 Contemporary China (3 cr.) A survey of recent Chinese history focusing on social, cultural, and political life in the People's Republic of China and post-1949 Taiwan. Events covered include the Long March, the Cultural Revolution, and the Tiananmen Square Protests of 1989. (Fall and Spring)
  • HIST-G 410 China, Japan and the U.S. in the 20th and 21st Centuries (3 cr.) This course discusses the relationship between China, Japan, and the U.S. in the 20th and 21st centuries.  We study the mutual perceptions and interactions of the three countires over the 20th Century, and examine how the perceptions and memoires of these interactions impact their relationships in the 21st Century.  (Every other year)
  • HIST-H 105 American History I (3 cr.) Colonial period, Revolution, Confederation and Constitution. National period to 1865. Political history forms the framework, with economic, social, cultural, and intellectual history interwoven. Introduction to historical literature, source material, and criticism. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
  • HIST-H 106 American History II (3 cr.) 1865 to present. Political history forms the framework, with economic, social, cultural, and intellectual history interwoven. Introduction to historical literature, source material, and criticism. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
  • HIST-H 107 American History: General Course III (3 cr.) A thematic approach to the study of American history, 1600 to the present. Each section will deal with one or more topics, according to the interests of the instructor. Topics might be, for example, a study of American character, race and ethnicity, violence, women and sexism, or mobility and change. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-H 113 History of Western Civilization I (3 cr.) Rise and fall of ancient civilizations; barbarian invasions; rise, flowering, and disruption of medieval Church; feudalism; national monarchies; rise of middle class; parliamentary institutions; liberalism; political democracy; industrial revolution; capitalism and socialist movements; nationalism, imperialism, and international rivalries; wars. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
  • HIST-H 114 History of Western Civilization II (3 cr.) Rise and fall of ancient civilizations; barbarian invasions; rise, flowering, and disruption of medieval Church; feudalism; national monarchies; rise of middle class; parliamentary institutions; liberalism; political democracy; industrial revolution; capitalism and socialist movements; nationalism, imperialism, and international rivalries; wars. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
  • HIST-H 207 Modern East Asian Civilization (3 cr.) Contrasting patterns of indigenous change and response to Western imperialism in East Asia during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. China and Japan receive primary consideration. Emphasis on the rise of nationalism and other movements directed toward revolutionary change. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-H 215 Proseminar in History (3 cr.) P: Freshmen and sophomores with consent of instructor. Selected topics of history. May be taken three times. (Spring)
  • HIST-H 219 Origins and History of the Second World War (3 cr.) Nazi and fascist aggression, collective security, appeasement and outbreak of war in Europe. German blitzkrieg; Russian front; North African, Italian, and Normandy campaigns; Hitler's racial policies; Japanese-American hostility; Pearl Harbor; island hopping; the atomic bomb. Roosevelt, Stalin, and Churchill at Teheran, Yalta, and Potsdam. War-crime trials. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-H 220 American Military History (3 cr.) From settlement of colonies to present. European background, colonial militia, Indian fighting. Principal foreign wars and their strategic objectives. Technological changes and effect of military on American society. Army is emphasized, with some attention to Navy, Marines, and Air Force. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-H 225 Special Topics in History (3 cr.) Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics will vary from semester to semester, but will usually be broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated once for credit. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-H 228 The Vietnam War (3 cr.) Indochinese history; French colonialism; Cold War dynamics; U.S. military-political actions; domestic U.S. politics; U.S. disengagement; Indochinese and American legacies. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-H 232 The World in the Twentieth Century (3 cr.) Shaping of the contemporary world, with emphasis on the interaction of the West, particularly Western imperialism and Western political and social ideas, with non-Western lands. Examination of revolutionary, national, ideological, social, and/or religious movements in Japan, China, India, Mexico, Russia, the Middle East, Southeast Asia, Africa. Today's political, social, and economic institutions. (Fall and Spring)
  • HIST-G 315 History and Memory of Modern China and Japan (3 cr.) This class surveys the history and memory revolving around the war between China and Japan (1937-45), which was part of the Pacific phase of World War II. By focusing on how the Sino-Japanese War, and especially the Nanjing (Nanking) Massacre has been remembered in both China and Japan, this course explores the relationship between memory, politics, culture, and society in the formation of history and memory in modern China and Japan. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-H 425 Topics in History (3 cr.) Intensive study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope from the perspective of arts and humanities. Topics will vary but will ordinarily cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated for credit. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-H 495 Undergraduate Readings in History (1-12 cr.) P: At least junior standing and 12 credit hours of related course work. Prior arrangement with individual faculty member. Faculty-supervised experience in museum work, historic preservation, historical societies, oral history, or other history- related fieldwork in private and public institutions. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-J 485 Historiography (3 cr.) Principles, methodology, and practice of historical study, with emphasis on the varieties of history, the writing of history, and historical literature. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-J 495 Proseminar for History Majors (3 cr.) Selected topics of history. May be taken three times. (Fall, Spring)
  • HIST-K 493 Reading for Honors (12 cr.) P: Approval of departmental honors committee. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-K 499 Senior Honors Thesis (3 cr.) Senior-level course for honors students only. Training in research and writing, culminating in honors thesis to be written under direction of faculty member. Oral examination over thesis conducted by three faculty members. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-T 325 Topics in History (3 cr.) Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope from perspective of the arts and humanities.  Topics will vary, but will usually cut across fields, regions, and periods.  May be repeated with a different topic. (Occasionally)
  • HIST-T 425 Topics in History (3 cr.) Intensive study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope from the perspective of arts and humanities. Topics will vary, but will ordinarily cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated for credit. (Occasionally)
Informatics (INFO)
  • INFO-I 101 Introduction to Informatics (4 cr.) P: Computer literacy. Emphasis on topics in human- computer interaction and human factors, collaborative technologies, group problem solving, ethics, privacy, and ownership of information and information sources, information representation, and the information life cycle. (Fall, Spring)
  • INFO-I 201 Mathematical Foundations of Informatics (4 cr.) An introduction to the suite of mathematical and logical tools used in information sciences, including finite mathematics, automata and computability theory, elementary probability, and statistics and basics of classical information theory. (Spring)
  • INFO-I 202 Social Informatics (3 cr.) P: INFO I101 Introduces the social and behavioral foundations of informatics. Theoretical approaches to how technology is used from psychological and sociotechnical perspectives. Examples of how current and emerging technologies such as games, e-mail, and electronic commerce are affecting daily lives, social relations, work, and leisure time. (Spring)
  • INFO-I 210 Information Infrastructure I (4 cr.) P: INFO I101 The software architecture of information systems. Basic concepts of systems and applications programming. Credit cannot be given for both INFO-I 210 and CSCI-C 201 or CSCI-A 201 except by permission. (Fall)
  • INFO-I 211 Information Infrastructure II (4 cr.) P: INFO-I 210 The systems architecture of distributed applications. Advanced programming, including an introduction to the programming of graphical systems.  Credit cannot be given for both INFO-I 211 and CSCI-C 307 or CSCI-A 302 except by permission. (Spring)
  • INFO-I 300 Human-Computer Interaction (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 211 The analysis of human factors and the design of computer application interfaces. A survey of current best practice with an eye toward what future technologies will allow. (Spring)
  • INFO-I 303 Organizational Informatics (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 101 Examines the various needs, uses, and consequences of information in organizational contexts. Topics include organizational types and characteristics, functional areas and business processes, information-based products and services, the use of and redefining role of information technology, the changing character of work life and organizational practices, sociotechnical structures and the rise and transformation of information-based industries.
  • INFO-I 308 Information Representation (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 201 and INFO-I 210. The basic structure of information representation in social and scientific applications. Representational structures and approaches from many disciplines are introduced; philosophical theories of classification and categorization; information access and representation on the World Wide Web; object-oriented design and relational databases; AI knowledge representation and discovery. (Spring)
  • INFO-I 310 Multimedia Arts and Technology (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 308

    The study of the evolution of media arts and underlying principles of communication. Application development paradigms in current practice. (Fall)

  • INFO-I 320 Distributed Systems and Collaborative Computing (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 211 An introductory treatment of distributed systems and programming. Topics range from the distributed and object models of computation to advanced concepts, such as remote method invocations, object brokers, object services, open systems, and future trends for distributed information systems. (Once a year)
  • INFO-I 400 Topics in Informatics (1-6 cr.) P: Junior standing and permission of the instructor.

    Content will vary with topic. Topics will include current trends in Informatics, Bioinformatics, and Health Informatics (Fall, Spring and Summer)

  • INFO-I 402 Informatics Project Management (3 cr.) P: CSCI-C 330 or equivalent.

    This course will focus on project management in an informatics setting. Students will become conversant in the tools and techniques of project management, such as project selection methods, work breakdown structures, network diagrams, critical path analysis, critical chain scheduling, cost estimates, earned value management, motivation theory, and team building (Fall)

  • INFO-I 420 Internship in Informatics Professional Practice (3-6 cr.) P: Approval of informatics director and completion of 100 and 200 level requirements in informatics. Students gain professional work experience in an industry or research organization setting, using skills and knowledge acquired in informatics course work. (Fall, Spring)
  • INFO-I 421 Applications of Data Mining (3 cr.) P: CSCI-C 150 This course explores the use of data mining techniques in different settings, including business and scientific domains.  The emphasis will be on using techniques, instead of developing new techniques or algorithms.  Students will select, prepare, visualize, analyze, and present data that leads to the discovery of novel and usable information. (Alternate years)
  • INFO-I 491 Capstone Project Internship I (1-6 cr.) P: Junior standing and permission of instructor.

    Students put their informatics education to practice through the development of a substantial project while working in a professional information technology environment (Fall, Spring and Summer)

  • INFO-I 492 Senior Thesis I (3 cr.) P: Senior standing and approval of the informatics director. The senior student prepares and presents a thesis: a substantial, typically multichapter paper based on a well-planned research or scholarly project, as determined by the student and a sponsoring faculty member.
  • INFO-I 493 Senior Thesis II (3 cr.) P: Senior standing and approval of the informatics director. The senior student prepares and presents a thesis: a substantial typically multichapter paper based on a well-planned research or scholarly project, as determined by the student and a sponsoring faculty member. (Spring)
  • INFO-I 494 Design and Development of an Information System I (3 cr.) P: Senior standing and approval of the informatics director. System design and development present both technical and managerial problems with which students will be familiar from their undergraduate course work. This course puts these lessons into practice as students work in teams to develop an information system. Examples of course projects include design and development of a database for a business or academic application, preparation and presentation of an interactive media performance or exhibit, or design and implementation of a stimulated environment (virtual presentation of an interactive media performance or exhibit, or design and implementation of a simulated environment (virtual reality). (Fall)
  • INFO-I 495 Design and Development of an Information System II (3 cr.) P: Senior standing and approval of the informatics director. System design and development present both technical and managerial problems with which students will be familiar from their undergraduate course work. This course puts these lessons into practice as students work in teams to develop an information system. Examples of course projects include design and development of a database for a business or academic application, preparation and presentation of an interactive media performance or exhibit, or design and implementation of a simulated environment (virtual reality). (Spring)
  • INFO-N 215 Online Document Development (3 cr.) P: CSCI-A 106 or CSCI-C 106 Study of the creation, publication and management of documents, images, and other media types on the Web. Topics include Web publishing, asset preparation, document types, contemporary content management systems and their use in the organization. Hands-on experience with contemporary systems for content management. (Fall, Spring and Summer)
Italian (ITAL)
  • ITAL-M 100 Elementary Italian I (4 cr.)

    Introduction to contemporary Italian language, geography, and culture. Involves a broad variety of assignments and activities that develop grammatical competency and proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Cultural topics and simple cultural comparisons are introduced.

  • ITAL-M 150 Elementary Italian II (4 cr.) P: M100

    Continued introduction to contemporary Italian language, geography, and culture. Involves a broad variety of assignments and activities that build grammatical competency and proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Practice with new cultural topics and basic cultural analysis.

  • ITAL-M 200 Intermediate Italian I (3 cr.) P: M150 or equivalent

    Building on Elementary Italian I-II, students further study and practice fundamental concepts and structures in Italian grammar. Through a variety of assignments and activities, they strengthen proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, writing, cultural analysis and understanding. Includes an introduction to brief literary texts.

  • ITAL-M 250 Intermediate Italian II (3 cr.) P: M200 or equivalent

    The study of more complex concepts and structures in Italian grammar. Through a variety of texts, media, and assignments, students practice listening, speaking, reading, writing, and they analyze cultural topics and situations in greater depth. Increased attention to short literary texts.

Journalism (JOUR)
  • JOUR-C 327 Writing for Publication (3 cr.) A workshop for nonmajors to improve writing skills and learn basic requirements of writing for publication. Instruction in market analysis and interpreting specific editorial requirements, in gathering and researching background materials, and in preparing manuscripts. Examination of various types and styles of published writing. Will not count toward journalism major. (Occasionally)
  • JOUR-J 200 Writing for Mass Media (3 cr.) P: Typing ability of 35 words per minute and ENG W131, or its equivalent. Small working seminar relating communication theory to practice in journalistic writing. Emphasis on narration, exposition, description, and argumentation. Development of skills in conceptualization, organization, gathering evidence, and effective presentation of articles for publication in various mass media. (Occasionally)
Linguistics (LING)

Canadian Studies (CDNS), Comparative Literature (CMLT), French (FREN), Linguistics (LING), and Spanish (SPAN) courses are listed in separate sections.

  • LING-L 103 Introduction to the Study of Language (3 cr.) P: Sophomore standing. Linguistics as a body of information; nature and function of language; relevance of linguistics to other disciplines, with reference to modern American English and principal European languages. (Occasionally)
  • LING-L 210 Topics in Language and Society (3 cr.) The study of topics related to the role of language as a social phenomenon.  May be repeated once for credit with a different topic. (Occasionally)
  • LING-L 315 Introduction to Sociolinguistics (3 cr.) Examines the relationships between language and society.  Issues include the nature of sociolinguistics; the importance of age, sex, socioeconomic status; language ideologies; why people use different dialects/languages in different situations; bilingualism and multilingualism; language choice, language attitudes, and language endangerment; the relevance of sociolinguistics to general linguistic theory. (Occasionally)
Mathematics (MATH)
  • MATH-A 100 Fundamentals of Algebra (4 cr.) P: Level MA102 on Placement Exam. Designed to provide algebraic skills needed for future mathematics courses.  Integers, rational and real numbers, exponents, decimals, polynomials, equations, word problems, factoring, roots and radicals, quadratic equations, graphing, linear equations in more than one variable, and inequalities.  Does not satisfy the College of Arts and Sciences distribution requirements nor general education mathematical reasoning requirement.  (Fall, Spring, Summer)
  • MATH-K 200 Statistics for Teachers (3 cr.) P: Level MA103 on Placement Exam or at least a C in MATH-A 100, The course serves as an introduction to statistical tools and spreadsheets or statistical packages used in everyday teaching practice. The emphasis is on understanding real-life applications of graphs of data, measures of central tendency, variation, probability, normal distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and sampling. (Fall, Spring)
  • MATH-K 300 Statistical Techniques (3 cr.) P: at least a C in MATH-M 117 or equivalent. MATH-M 118 An introduction to statistics. Nature of statistical data. Ordering and manipulation of data. Measures of central tendency and dispersion. Elementary probability. Concepts of statistical inference and decision, estimation, and hypothesis testing. Special topics discussed may include regression and correlation, analysis of variance, nonparametric methods. (Occasionally)
  • MATH-M 015 Arithmetic with Algebra (0 cr.) Integers, proportional reasoning, measurement systems, exponents, solving linear inequalities, polynomial operations, geometric concepts, rational numbers, ratios and percent, algebraic expressions, solving and writing linear equations, literal equations, graphs of linear equations, applications.  Does not satisfy the College of Arts and Sciences distribution requirements nor general education mathematical reasoning requirement.  (Fall, Spring)
  • MATH-M 100 Basic Mathematics (4 cr.) P: Level MA103 on Placement Exam, or at least a C in MATH-A 100. Topics in algebra, geometry, graphing, probability, statistics, and consumer mathematics. Emphasis on problem solving and constructing mathematical models. This course is designed for allied health students and liberal arts students who plan to take no additional mathematics courses. Does not count toward a major in mathematics. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
  • MATH-M 110 Excursions into Mathematics (3 cr.) P: Level MA103 on Placement Exam, or at least a C in MATH-A 100. A course designed to convey the flavor and spirit of mathematics, stressing reasoning and comprehension rather than technique. Not preparatory to other courses; explores the theory of games and related topics that may include the mathematics of politics and elections. This course does not count toward a major in mathematics. (Occasionally)
  • MATH-M 117 Intermediate Algebra (3 cr.) P: Level MA103 on Placement Exam or MATH-A 100. Designed to introduce nonlinear models and their applications, advanced linear systems, and function foundations.  Does not satisfy the College of Arts and Sciences distribution requirements nor general education mathematical reasoning requirement. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
  • MATH-M 118 Finite Mathematics (3 cr.) P: Level MA104 on Placement Exam, or at least a C in MATH-M 117. Set theory, linear systems, matrices, probability, linear programming, Markov chains. Applications to problems from business and the social sciences. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
  • MATH-M 119 Brief Survey of Calculus (3 cr.) P: Level MA014 on Placement Exam or at least a C in MATH M117. Introduction to calculus. Primarily for students in business and the social sciences. A student cannot receive credit for both MATH-M 119 and MATH-M 215. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
  • MATH-M 125 Precalculus Mathematics (3 cr.) P: Level MA104 on the Placement Exam or at least a C in MATH-M 117. Designed to prepare students for calculus (MATH-M 215). Algebraic operations, polynomial, rational exponential, and logarithmic functions and their graphs, conic sections, linear systems of equations. Does not satisfy the arts and sciences distributional requirements. (Fall, Spring, Summer II)
  • MATH-M 126 Trigonometric Functions (2-3 cr.) P: Level MA104 on Placement Exam, or at least a C in MATH-M 117. MATH M125 or equivalent. In-depth study of trigonometric functions, definitions, unit circle, graphs, inverse functions, identities, trigonometric equations and applications.  This course, together with MATH-M 125 is designed to prepare students for calculus (MATH-M 215). (Occasionally)
  • MATH-M 127 Pre-calculus with Trigonometry (5 cr.) P: Level MA104 on Placement Exam, or at least a C in MATH-M 117.

    This course is designed to prepare students for calculus (M 215). Subject matter includes polynomial, rational, root, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions and their applications. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

  • MATH-M 215 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I (5 cr.) P: Level MA105 on Placement Exam or MATH-M 125 and MATH-M 126 or MATH-M 127. Differential calculus of functions of one variable, with applications. Functions, graphs, limits, continuity, derivatives of trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions, tangent lines, optimization problems, curve sketching,  L'Hopital's Rule, definite integral, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. A student cannot receive credit for both MATH-M 119 and MATH-M 215. (Fall, Spring, Summer I)

  • MATH-M 216 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II (5 cr.) P: M215 Integral calculus of functions of one variable. Antiderivatives, definite integrals, techniques of integration, areas, volumes, surface areas, arc length, parametric functions, polar coordinates, limits of sequences, convergence of infinite series, Taylor polynomials, power series, and applications. (Fall, Spring)

  • MATH-M 295 Readings and Research (1-3 cr.) Supervised problem solving. Admission only with permission of a member of the mathematics faculty, who will act as supervisor. (Occasionally)
  • MATH-M 301 Applied Linear Algebra (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 216 or consent of instructor. Emphasis on applications: systems of linear equations, vector spaces, linear transformations, matrices, simplex method in linear programming. Computer used for applications. Credit not given for both MATH-M 301 and MATH-M 303. (2-year cycle, see department for details)
  • MATH-M 311 Calculus III (4 cr.) P: MATH-M 216. Elementary geometry of 2, 3, and n-space; functions of several variables; partial differentiation; minimum and maximum problems; multiple integration.  (Fall)
  • MATH-M 312 Calculus IV (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 311. Differential calculus of vector-valued functions, transformation of coordinates, change of variables in multiple integrals. Vector integral calculus: line integrals, Green's theorem, surface integrals, Stokes' theorem. Applications. (Occasionally)
  • MATH-M 320 Theory of Interest (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 216. Measurement of interest: accumulation and discount, equations of value, annuities, perpetuities, amortization and sinking funds, yield rates, bonds and other securities, installment loans, depreciation, depletion, and capitalized cost. This course covers topics corresponding to the society of Actuaries' Exam FM.(2-year cycle, see department for details)
  • MATH-M 325 Problem-solving Seminar in Actuarial Science (3 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. A problem- solving seminar to prepare students for the actuarial exams. May be repeated up to three times for credit. (2-year cycle, see department for details)
  • MATH-M 343 Introduction to Differential Equations with Applications I (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 216. Derivation of equations of mathematical physics, biology, etc. Ordinary differential equations and methods for their solution, especially series methods. Simple vector field theory. Theory of series, Fourier series, applications to partial differential equations. Integration theorems, Laplace and Fourier transforms, applications. A student may not receive credit for both MATH-M 313 and MATH-M 343. (2-year cycle, see department for details)
  • MATH-M 360 Elements of Probability (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 216 and MATH-M 311, which may be taken concurrently. MATH-M 118. The study of probability models that involve one or more random variables. Topics include conditional probability and independence, gambler's ruin and other problems involving repeated Bernoulli trials, discrete and continuous probability distributions, moment generating functions, probability distributions for several random variables, some basic sampling distributions of mathematical statistics, and the central limit theorem. Course topics match portions of Exam for Course 1 of the Society of Actuaries. Credit not given for both MATH-M 360 and MATH-M 365. (2-year cycle, see department for details)
  • MATH-M 366 Elements of Statistical Inference (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 360. ECON-E 270. An introduction to statistical estimation and hypothesis testing. Topics include the maximum likelihood method of estimation and the method of moments, the Rao-Cramer bound, large sample confidence intervals, type I and type II errors in hypothesis testing, likelihood ratio tests, goodness of fit tests, linear models, and the method of least squares.  This course covers portions of Actuarial Exam C. (2-year cycle, see department for details)
  • MATH-M 371 Elementary Computational Methods (3 cr.) P: CSCI-C 201, or equivalent or consent of instructor. MATH-M 215, MATH-M 216. Interpolation and approximation of functions, solution of equations, numerical integration and differentiation. Errors, convergence, and stability of the procedures. Students write and use programs applying numerical methods. (Occasionally)
  • MATH-M 391 Foundations of the Number Systems (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 216. Sets, functions and relations, groups, real and complex numbers. Bridges the gap between elementary and advanced courses. Recommended for students with insufficient background for 400-level courses, for M.A.T. candidates, and for students in education. Not open to students who have received credit for MATH M403 or MATH M413. Credit given only for one of MATH-M 391, MATH-M 393. (2-year cycle, see department for details)
  • MATH-M 393 Bridge to Abstract Mathematics (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 216 or consent of instructor. Preparation for 400-level math courses. Teaches structures and strategies of proofs in a variety of mathematical settings: logic, sets, combinatorics, relations and functions, and abstract algebra. Credit given only for one of MATH-M 391, MATH-M 393. (2-year cycle, see department for details)
  • MATH-M 403 Introduction to Modern Algebra I (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 301 or MATH-M 307. Study of groups, rings, fields (usually including Galois theory), with applications to linear transformations. (2-year cycle, see department for details)
  • MATH-M 405 Number Theory (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 216. Numbers and their representation, divisibility and factorization, primes and their distribution, number theoretic functions, congruences, primitive roots, diophantine equations, quadratic residues, sums of squares, number theory and analysis, algebraic numbers, irrational and transcendental numbers. (Occasionally)
  • MATH-M 406 Topics in Mathematics (3 cr.) Selected topics in various areas of mathematics that are not covered by the standard courses. May be repeated for credit. (Occasionally)
  • MATH-M 413 Introduction to Analysis I (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 301 or MATH-M 303, and MATH-M 311, or consent of instructor. Modern theory of real number system, limits, functions, sequences and series, Riemann-Stieltjes integral, and special topics. (2-year cycle, see department for details)
  • MATH-M 420 Metric Space Topology (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 301 or MATH-M 303. Topology of Euclidean and metric spaces. Limits and continuity. Topological properties of metric spaces, including separation properties, connectedness, and compactness. Complete metric spaces. Elementary general topology. (Occasionally)
  • MATH-M 425 Graph (Network) Theory and Combinatorial Theory (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 301 or MATH-M 303. Graph theory: basic concepts, connectivity, planarity, coloring theorems, matroid theory, network programming, and selected topics. Combinatorial theory: generating functions, incidence matrices, block designs, perfect difference sets, selection theorems, enumeration, and other selected topics. (Occasionally)
  • MATH-M 436 Introduction to Geometries (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 391 or its equivalent. Non-Euclidean geometry, axiom systems. Plane projective geometry, Desarguesian planes, perspectivities coordinates in the real projective plane. The group of projective transformations and subgeometries corresponding to subgroups. Models for geometries. Circular transformations. (Occasionally)
  • MATH-M 447 Mathematical Models and Applications I (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 311and MATH-M 360, or consent of instructor. Formation and study of mathematical models used in the biological, social, and management sciences. Mathematical topics include games, graphs, Markov and Poisson processes, mathematical programming, queues, and equations of growth. (2-year cycle, see department for details)
  • MATH-M 448 Mathematical Models and Applications II (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 311 and MATH-M 360, or consent of instructor. Formation and study of mathematical models used in the biological, social, and management sciences. Mathematical topics include games, graphs, Markov and Poisson processes, mathematical programming, queues, and equations of growth. (2-year cycle, see department for details)
  • MATH-M 451 The Mathematics of Finance (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 311 and MATH-M 366, R: Math-M 343.  Course covers probability theory, Brownian motion, Ito's Lemma, stochastic differential equations, and dynamic hedging.  These topics are applied to the Black-Scholes formula, the pricing of financial derivatives, and the term theory of interest rates.  (Occasionally)
  • MATH-M 463 Introduction to Probability Theory (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 301 or MATH-M 303, and MATH-M 311, or consent of instructor. Idealized random experiments, conditional probability, independence, compound experiments. Univariate distributions, countable additivity, discrete and continuous distributions, Lebesgue-Stieltjes integral (heuristic treatment), moments, multivariate distribution. Generating functions, limit theorems, normal distribution. (Occasionally)
  • MATH-M 469 Applied Statistical Techniques (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 366. Linear regression, multiple regression, applications to credibility theory, time series and ARIMA models, estimation, fitting, and forecasting.  This course covers the Applied Statistics portion of the actuarial VEE requirements and portions of Exam C. (2-year cycle, see department for details)
  • MATH-M 477 Mathematics of Operations Research (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 301 or MATH-M 303, MATH-M 311, MATH-M 360. Introduction to the methods of operations research. Linear programming, dynamic programming, integer programming, network problems, queuing theory, scheduling, decision analysis, simulation. (2-year cycle, see department for details)
  • MATH-M 483 Historical Development of Modern Mathematics (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 301, MATH-M 311, and at least 3 additional credit hours in mathematics at the 300 level or above. The development of modern mathematics from 1660 to 1870 will be presented. The emphasis is on the development of calculus and its ramifications and the gradual evolution of mathematical thought from mainly computational to mainly conceptual. (Occasionally)
  • MATH-M 485 Life Contingencies I (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 320 and MATH-M 360. Measurement of mortality, life annuities, life insurance, net annual premiums, net level premium reserves, the joint life and last- survivor statuses, and multiple-decrement tables. (2-year cycle, see department for details)
  • MATH-M 486 Life Contingencies II (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 485. Population theory, the joint life status, last- survivor and general multilife statuses, contingent functions, compound contingent functions, reversionary annuities, multiple-decrement tables, tables with secondary decrements. (Occasionally)
  • MATH-M 493 Senior Thesis in Mathematics (3 cr.) P: At least one 400-level mathematics course. At least one 400-level mathematics course. Student must write and present a paper, relating to 400-level mathematics study, on a topic agreed upon by the student and the department chair or advisor delegated by the chair.
  • MATH-T 101 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I (3 cr.) P: Proficiency in elementary algebra (demonstrated by placement exam or a grade of C or better in MATH-A 100) and proficiency in geometry (one year, high school, C or better). R: Proficiency in intermediate algebra MATH-M 117. Elements of set theory, counting numbers. Operations on counting numbers, integers, rational numbers, and real numbers. Open only to elementary education majors. Does not count toward arts and sciences distribution requirement. (Fall, Spring)
  • MATH-T 102 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II (3 cr.) P: MATH-T 101. Sets, operations, and functions. Prime numbers and elementary number theory. Elementary combinatorics, probability, and statistics. Open only to elementary education majors. Does not count toward arts and sciences distribution requirement. (Spring, Summer I)
  • MATH-T 103 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers III (3 cr.) P: MATH-T 102. Descriptions and properties of basic geometric figures. Rigid motions. Axiomatics. Measurement, analytic geometry, and graphs of functions. Discussion of modern mathematics. Open only to elementary education majors. Does not count toward arts and sciences distribution requirement. (Fall, Summer II)
  • MATH-T 336 Topics in Euclidean Geometry (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 391. Axiom systems for the plane; the parallel postulate and non-Euclidean geometry; classical theorems. Geometric transformation theory vectors and analytic geometry; convexity; theory of area and volume. (2-year cycle, see department for details)
  • MATH-T 490 Topics for Elementary Teachers (3 cr.) P: MATH-T 103. Development and study of a body of mathematics specifically designed for experienced elementary teachers. Examples may include probability, statistics, geometry, and algebra. Open only to graduate elementary teachers with permission of the instructor. Does not count toward arts and sciences distribution requirement. (Occasionally)
  • MATH-T 493 Mathematics of Middle and High School, Advanced Perspective (3 cr.) P: Junior or senior standing in mathematics education or consent of instructor. Team-taught capstone course for mathematics education majors. Mathematics of grades 6-12 and methods of instruction. Topics explored from a college perspective. (Occasionally)
  • MATH-Y 398 Internship in Professional Practice (3 cr.) P: Approval of Department of Mathematics. Professional work experience involving significant use of mathematics or statistics. Evaluation of performance by employer and Department of Mathematics. Does not count toward requirements. May be repeated with approval of Department of Mathematics for a total of 6 credits.
Music (MUS)

Music (MUS) and Theatre (THTR) courses are listed in separate sections.

  • MUS-D 115 Modern Dance I (2 cr.) Modern Dance technique for beginners.  This course will emphasize body alignment, movement dynamics, spatial awareness, emotional intensity of various movements and an understanding of kinesthetic concepts.  Also, Laban’s theory of effort/shape will be studied and applied to movements.  (Occasionally)
  • MUS-J 100 Ballet (2 cr.) Introductory course: open to all students. Does not count toward fulfillment of College of Arts and Sciences Group III distribution requirements. (Occasionally)
  • MUS-J 200 Ballet (secondary) (2 cr.) For students wanting to study ballet as a related field but not as a major. Beginners' sections open to all students. Open to intermediate and advanced students with consent of instructor. Does not count toward fulfillment of College of Arts and Sciences Group III distribution requirements. (Occasionally)
  • MUS-J 210 Jazz Dance (2 cr.) A study of dance and dance attitudes using rhythms based on music primarily with a jazz tempo and jazz form. Does not count toward fulfillment of College of Arts and Sciences Group III distribution requirements. (Occasionally)
  • MUS-L 101 Beginning Guitar (2  cr.) This course is intended as an introduction to techniques employed in contemporary guitar styles. This will involve learning basic open and bar chords, learning how to read music and play it on the instrument and learning basic guitar finger style techniques. The course will also cover basic music theory necessary for a) playing songs and b) getting basic fret board knowledge. No previous experience required.
  • MUS-M 174 Music for the Listener I (3 cr.) How to listen to music; art of music and its materials; instruments and musical forms. (Fall, Spring)
  • MUS-P 100 Piano Elect/Secondary (2 cr.) An elective course designed to provide private instruction in piano at each student's level.  May be repeated once more for credit.  Does not count toward fulfillment of College of Arts and Sciences Group III distribution requirements.  (Fall, Spring)
  • MUS-V 100 Voice (2 cr.) An elective course designed to provide instruction in voice at each student's level. May be repeated once more for credit. Does not count toward fulfillment of College of Arts and Sciences Group III distribution requirements. (Fall, Spring)
  • MUS-Z 103 Special Topics in Music (3 cr.)

    (Occasionally)

Philosophy (PHIL)
  • PHIL-P 100 Introduction to Philosophy (3 cr.) Perennial problems of philosophy, including problems in ethics, in epistemology and metaphysics, and in philosophy of religion. (Fall, Spring, Summer I and II)
  • PHIL-P 117 Atheism and the Question of God's Existence (3 cr.) Explores the central arguments, concepts, and responses surrounding atheism and agnosticism.  Topics include an examination of the arguments supporting theism, deductive and inductive atheology, and the existence of evil, faith, miracles, and morality. (Annually)
  • PHIL-P 135 Introduction to Phenomenology and Existentialism (3 cr.) Existentialism as a philosophical movement founded on phenomenology. Philosophical themes and their development, applications, or exemplifications in existentialist literature. Course presupposes no particular knowledge of philosophy. Readings from some or all of the following: Buber, Camus, Heidegger, Husserl, Jaspers, Kierkegaard, Marcel, Nietzsche, Sartre. (Occasionally)
  • PHIL-P 140 Introduction to Ethics (3 cr.) Some ancient, medieval, or modern philosophers' answers to ethical problems (e.g., nature of good and evil, relation of duty to self-interest, objectivity of moral judgments). (Fall, Spring, Summer I and II)
  • PHIL-P 150 Elementary Logic (3 cr.) Development of critical tools for the evaluation of arguments. Not a prerequisite for PHIL P250. (Fall, Spring, Summer I and II)
  • PHIL-P 200 Problems in Philosophy (3 cr.) A study of special, experimental, or timely topics drawn from the full range of philosophical discussion and designed to engage interests unmet in the regular curriculum. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6credit hours. (Occasionally)
  • PHIL-P 201 Ancient Greek Philosophy (3 cr.) Selective survey of ancient Greek philosophy (Pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle). (Annually)
  • PHIL-P 206 Philosophy of Religion (3 cr.) A survey of the main topics in the philosophy of religion, such as arguments for or against the existence of God, divine attributes, the problem of evil, miracles, immortality, and the connection between religion and morality. (Occasionally)
  • PHIL-P 211 Modern Philosophy: Descartes through Kant (3 cr.) P: 3 credit hours of philosophy. Selective survey of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century philosophy, including some or all of Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Kant. (Occasionally)
  • PHIL-P 246 Introduction to Philosophy and Art (3 cr.) Introduction to the philosophical study of art and the relationship between art and philosophy.  Topics include the nature of a work of art, the role of emotions in art, the interpretation and appreciation of art, and the way philosophy is expressed in art. (Annually)
  • PHIL-P 250 Introductory Symbolic Logic (3 cr.) Propositional logic and first-order quantificational logic. (Occasionally)
  • PHIL-P 301 Medieval Philosophy (3 cr.) P: 3 credit hours of philosophy. A survey, including Augustine, Boethius, Anselm, Abelard, Bonaventure, Aquinas, Duns Scotus, Ockham, and Nicholas of Cusa. (Occasionally)
  • PHIL-P 304 Nineteenth-Century Philosophy (3 cr.) P: 3 credit hours of philosophy. Selective survey of postKantian philosophy including Hegel, Marx, Kierkegaard, Mill. (Occasionally)
  • PHIL-P 306 Business Ethics (3 cr.) A philosophical examination of ethical issues that arise in the context of business. Moral theory will be applied to such problems as the ethical evaluation of corporations, what constitutes fair profit, and truth in advertising. (Fall, Spring, Summer I and II)
  • PHIL-P 310 Metaphysics (3 cr.) P: 3 credit hours of philosophy. Topics such as existence, individuation, contingency, universals and particulars, monism-pluralism, Platonism-nominalism, idealism-realism. (Occasionally)
  • PHIL-P 316 Twentieth-Century Philosophy (3 cr.) A survey of representative philosophical approaches to problems of the present age, such as pragmatism, process and analytic philosophy, phenomenology, existentialism, neo-Marxism, and non-Western philosophy. (Occasionally)
  • PHIL-P 335 Phenomenology and Existentialism (3 cr.) P: 3 credit hours of philosophy. Selected readings from Buber, Camus, Heidegger, Husserl, Jaspers, Kierkegaard, Marcel, Nietzsche, Sartre, and others. (Occasionally)
  • PHIL-P 339 Contemporary Issues in Human Rights (3 cr.) This course examines human rights. Using the International Bill of Human Rights, concepts such as "dignity" and "respect" are applied directly to the local level. One objective is to link disagreement over rights and corresponding duties with differences in perception. Furthermore, accountability-securing measures are assessed in connection with failed state theory. (Occasionally)
  • PHIL-P 342 Problems of Ethics (3 cr.) P: 3 credit hours of philosophy May concentrate on a single large problem, such as whether utilitarianism is an adequate ethical theory or several more or less independent problems, such as the nature of goodness and the objectivity of moral judgments. (Occasionally)
  • PHIL-P 343 Classics in Social and Political Philosophy (3 cr.) P: 3 credit hours of philosophy Readings from Plato and Aristotle to Hobbes, Locke, Hegel, and Marx. Topics include the ideal state, the nature and proper ends of the state, natural law and natural rights, the social contract theory, and the notion of community. (Occasionally)
  • PHIL-P 346 Philosophy and Art (3 cr.) P: 3 credit hours of philosophy Selected philosophical problems concerning art and art criticism. Topics such as the definition of art, expression, representation, style, form and content, and the aesthetic and the cognitive. (Occasionally)
  • PHIL-P 360 Introduction to Philosophy of Mind (3 cr.) P: 3 credit hours of philosophy Selected topics from among the following: the nature of mental phenomena (e.g., thinking, volition, perception, emotion); and the mind-body problem (e.g., dualism, behaviorism, materialism). (Occasionally)
  • PHIL-P 383 Topics in Philosophy (variable title) (3 cr.) An advanced study of special, experimental, or timely topics drawn from the full range of philosophical discussion and designed to engage interests unmet in the regular curriculum. (Occasionally)
  • PHIL-P 393 Biomedical Ethics (3 cr.) A philosophical consideration of ethical problems that arise in current biomedical practice; for instance, abortion, euthanasia, determination of death, consent to treatment, and professional responsibilities in connection with research, experimentation, and health care delivery. (Fall, Spring, Summer I and II)
  • PHIL-P 490 Readings in Philosophy (1-3 cr.) P: consent of instructor Intensive study of selected authors, topics, and problems. (Occasionally)
PHYSIOLOGY (PHSL)
  • PHSL-P 130 Human Biology (4 cr.) Basic concepts in human biology. Covers reproduction and develop­ment, physiological regulations, stress biology, and behavioral biology and emphasizes related social problems. Credit will be given for only one of the following introductory-level courses or sequences: BIOL-L 100, PHSL-P 130, or BIOL-L 101-L 102. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
  • PHSL-P 261 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4 cr.) P: BIOL-L 100, PHSL-P 130, or the equivalent, or combined SAT of 700+ Introduction to basic structure and function of the human body, including laboratory studies in gross anatomy, histology, and physiology. Topics are cellular anatomy and physiology; body tissues, and integument and the skeletal, muscle, endocrine, and nervous systems. (Fall, Spring)
  • PHSL-P 262 Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4 cr.) P: PHSL-P 261 Second semester topics are the circulatory, respiratory, urinary, digestive, and reproductive systems: fluid and electrolyte balance; and acid-base balance. (PHSL-P 261 and PHSL-P 262 cannot be used to fulfill the physiology requirement of biology majors.) (Fall, Spring, Summer I and II)
  • PHSL-P 263 Principles of Anatomy and Physiology— Special Topics (0.5-3 cr.) R: PHSL-P 261 or PHSL-P 262 concurrent or with consent of instructor. Study of selected topics in human anatomy and physiology as they relate to specific organ systems or functions. Topics vary by semester and correlate with material covered in PHSL-P 261 and PHSL-P 262. May be repeated with change in topic. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
  • PHSL-P 416 Comparative Animal Physiology (3 cr.) P: two college biology courses, one college mathematics course, CHEM C106 Lecture course. Physiological principles of the respiratory, circulatory, excretory, and related systems in a variety of invertebrate and vertebrate animals. (Fall or Spring)
  • PHSL-P 431 Human Physiology (3 cr.) P: BIOL L211, CHEM C 106, or equivalent, junior or senior status R: BIOL L312 This is an introductory course in human physiology designed to introduce biology majors and preprofessional students to the function of the human body. Emphasis in on how organ systems work to maintain homeostasis, a constant internal environment, in response to variable external environmental conditions. Special considerations will be given to change in physiological states in health and disease. All major organ systems of the body will be covered. A laboratory component is incorporated into the structure of the course. (Fall or Spring)
  • PHSL-P 461 Comparative Physiology of Animals (4 cr.) P: one year of chemistry R: one 300-400 level biology course. The basic mechanisms are considered whereby various organisms integrate and coordinate similar functional requirements based on phylogeny and environmental relationships. (Fall or Spring)
Physics (PHYS)
  • PHYS-P 101 Physics in the Modern World I (4 cr.) Three lectures and one 1 1/2-hour laboratory period each week. Includes elements of classical physics and the ideas, language, and impact of physics today. Not open to students with credit in PHYS-P 100, PHYS-P 103, PHYS-P 151, PHYS-P 201, or PHYS-P 221. (Fall/Spring (occasionally))
  • PHYS-P 120 Energy and Technology (3 cr.) Intended for students majoring in the social sciences and the School of Business and Economics. Provides physical basis for understanding interactions of technology and society, thereby promoting rational decision making in problems such as energy use, automation, and the directions of technological change. (Occasionally)
  • PHYS-P 201 General Physics I (5 cr.) P: MATH-M 125, MATH-M 126 or equivalent. Newtonian mechanics, wave motion, heat and thermodynamics, fluids. Application of physical principles to related scientific disciplines including life sciences. One discussion section, two lectures, and one two-hour laboratory period each week. Credit cannot be given for PHYS-P 201 and PHYS-P 221. (Fall)
  • PHYS-P 202 General Physics II (5 cr.) P: PHYS-P 201. Wave motion, electricity and magnetism, geometrical and physical optics, introduction to concepts of relativity, quantum theory, atomic and nuclear physics. One discussion section, two lectures, and one two-hour laboratory each week. Credit cannot be given for PHYS-P 202 and PHYS-P 222. (Spring)
  • PHYS-P 221 Physics I (5 cr.) P: MATH-M 216 or consent of instructor. First semester of a three-semester sequence intended for chemistry, mathematics, and physics majors. Newtonian mechanics, oscillations and waves, heat and thermodynamics. Lectures, discussion section, two-hour laboratory. Credit cannot be given for PHYS-P 201 and PHYS-P 221. (Fall)
  • PHYS-P 222 Physics II (5 cr.) P: PHYS-P 221. Second semester of a three-semester sequence. Primarily electricity, magnetism, and geometrical and physical optics. Lectures, discussion, and two-hour laboratory. Credit cannot be given for PHYS-P 202 and PHYS-P 222. (Spring)
  • PHYS-P 301 Physics III (3 cr.) P: PHYS-P 222. Third semester of three-semester sequence. Students from PHYS-P 202 who have taken or are now taking MATH-M 216 are also eligible for this course. Special theory of relativity; introduction to quantum theory; atomic, nuclear, solid state, and elementary particle physics. Two lecture periods. (Spring—alternate year)
  • PHYS-P 303 Digital Electronics (1-3 cr.) P: PHYS-P 282 or consent of instructor. A laboratory course dealing with digital devices, decoders, multiplexers, light-emitting displays, flip-flops, multivibrators, memories, registers, microcomputer construction, and programming. Three hours of laboratory work per week for each credit hour. Course may be retaken up to a total of 3 credit hours. (Occasionally)
  • PHYS-P 309 Intermediate Physics Laboratory (2 cr.) P: PHYS-P 202 or PHYS-P 222, MATH-M 216 or equivalent. Fundamental experiments in mechanics, electricity and magnetism, thermodynamics, optics, and modern physics. Emphasis is placed upon developing basic laboratory skills and data analysis techniques, including computer reduction and analysis of the data. (Occasionally)
  • PHYS-P 310 Environmental Physics (3 cr.) P: PHYS-P 201 or PHYS-P 221; MATH-M 215; or consent of instructor. For biological and physical science majors. Study of relationship of physics to current environmental problems. Energy production, comparison of sources and by-products, nature of possible solutions to problems of noise, particulate matter in atmosphere. Credit will not be given for both PHYS-P 310 and PHYS-E 350 or for PHYS-P 310 and PHYS-E 300. (Occasionally)
  • PHYS-P 320 Introduction to Biophysics (3 cr.) P: PHYS-P 202 or PHYS-P 222; MATH-M 119 or equivalent; CHEM-C 106; one biology course; or consent of instructor. Application of physical principles to biological systems from the molecular to the organismal level. Primarily for biology and chemistry majors. (Occasionally)
  • PHYS-P 331 Theory of Electricity and Magnetism I (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 311 or MATH-M 313, PHYS-P 202 and PHYS-P 222 or consent of instructor. Electrostatic fields and differential operators, Laplace and Poisson equations, dielectric materials, steady currents, power and energy, induction, magnetic fields, scalar and vector potentials, Maxwell's equations. (Occasionally)
  • PHYS-P 332 Theory of Electricity and Magnetism II (3 cr.) P: PHYS-P 331 or consent of instructor. Magnetic materials, wave equations and radiation, energy transfer and conversion, Poynting vector and momentum, retarded potentials, dipole radiation, transmission lines and wave guides, relativity. (Occasionally)
  • PHYS-P 340 Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics (3 cr.) P: PHYS-P 202 or PHYS-P 222. C: MATH-M 311 or MATH-M 313. Intermediate course, covering three laws of thermodynamics, classical and quantum statistical mechanics, and some applications. (occasionally)
Political Science (POLS)
  • POLS-Y 103 Introduction to American Politics (3 cr.) An introduction to the nature of politics and government and the dynamics of American politics. The course includes an analysis of the origin and nature of the American federal system, its political party base, and its major institutions. (Fall and Spring)
  • POLS-Y 105 Introduction to Political Theory (3 cr.) Perennial problems of political philosophy, including relationships between rulers and the ruled, nature of authority, social conflict, character of political knowledge, and objectives of political action. (Occasionally)
  • POLS-Y 107 Introduction to Comparative Politics (3 cr.) Examines countries around the world to investigate fundamental questions about politics.  Topics include democratic development, promotion of economic prosperity, maintenance of security, and management of ethnic and religious conflict.  Critical thinking skills encouraged.  Cases for comparison include advanced industrialized democracies, communist and former communist countries, and developing countries. (Occasionally)
  • POLS-Y 109 Introduction to International Relations (3 cr.) Causes of war, nature and attributes of the state, imperialism, international law, national sovereignty, arbitration, adjudication, international organization, major international issues. (Occasionally)
  • POLS-Y 163 Politics and Religion (3 cr.) This is an introductory course that will cover religion in the U.S. political system from the legal, historical, social, and political perspectives.  This includes an analysis of the relationship between church and state, the impact of religion on major dimensions of politics in the U.S. and the impact of religion on major elements of our society. (Occasionally)
  • POLS-Y 200 Contemporary Political Topics (3 cr.) An extensive analysis of selected contemporary political problems. Topics vary from semester to semester and are listed in the Schedule of Classes. (Occasionally)
  • POLS-Y 205 Elements of Political Analysis (3 cr.) An introduction to the major approaches to and techniques of the systematic study of politics. Includes an introduction to the analysis of quantitative data. Required for majors. (Fall)
  • POLS-Y 301 Political Parties and Interest Groups (3 cr.) A presentation of the nature of political parties, social movements, and interest groups and their relationship to the process of representation. The course also includes a discussion of the structure and organization of and membership in these groups. Theories about political party activity and behavior are also evaluated. (Occasionally)
  • POLS-Y 302 Public Bureaucracy in Modern Society (3 cr.)

    Examines public bureaucracy, with special emphasis upon the United States as a political phenomenon engaging in policy-making and in the definition of the terms of policy issues. Considers the role of bureaucratic instruments in promoting social change and in responding to it. (Occasionally)

  • POLS-Y 303 Formation of Public Policy in the United States (3 cr.) An analysis of the processes and institutions involved in the formation of public policy with emphasis on Congressional policy-making, oversight, fiscal control, and political setting. (Occasionally)
  • POLS-Y 304 American Constitutional Law I (3 cr.) A study of the nature and function of law and the judicial process. An analysis of selected Supreme Court decisions interpreting the U.S. Constitution. (Fall)
  • POLS-Y 305 American Constitutional Law II (3 cr.) A further study of the nature and function of law and the judicial process with an analysis of other important selected Supreme Court decisions interpreting the U.S. Constitution. (Occasionally)
  • POLS-Y 307 Indiana State Government and Politics (3 cr.) A study of the constitutional foundations, political development, organization, accomplishments, and current problems of Indiana government. (Occasionally)
  • POLS-Y 308 Urban Politics (3 cr.) An analysis of political behavior in modern American urban communities. The course emphasizes the impact of municipal organization, city officials and bureaucracies, social and economic notables, political parties, interest groups, the general public, and protest organizations on urban policy outcomes. (Occasionally)
  • POLS-Y 312 Workshop in State and Local Government (3 cr.) An intensive study of administration problems such as financial administration, public health, and welfare. (Occasionally)
  • POLS-Y 316 Public Opinion and Political Participation (3 cr.) A study of the nature of public opinion and its impact on major domestic and foreign policy issues, of mass political ideology, of voting behavior and other forms of political participation, and of political culture. (Occasionally)
  • POLS-Y 318 The American Presidency (3 cr.) An analysis of the development of the Presidency and its relationship to the American political system. The course also offers a study of presidential personalities and roles, with emphasis on political leadership, and of problems of the contemporary Presidency. (Spring)
  • POLS-Y 319 The United States Congress (3 cr.) A study of the role of Congress in American national politics with emphasis on constitutional powers, organization, historical development, reform, Congressional-executive relations, policy-making, oversight, and fiscal control. (Fall)
  • POLS-Y 335 Western European Politics (3 cr.) Development, structure, and functioning of political systems, primarily in France, Italy, and Germany. Political dynamics of European integration. (Fall)
  • POLS-Y 360 United States Foreign Policy (3 cr.) Analysis of institutions and processes involved in the formation and implementation of American foreign policy. The course also offers an overview of major post-World War II U.S. foreign policies. (Fall)
  • POLS-Y 362 International Politics of Selected Regions (3 cr.) The region studied will vary with the instructor and the year. However, Latin America is often the region selected. Current information may be obtained from the Political Science faculty. (Every other Spring)
  • POLS-Y 366 Current Foreign Policy Problems (3 cr.) An analysis of foreign policy issues and options facing the United States. Such issues and options may include totalitarianism, imperialism, terrorism, containment, diplomacy, preventive actions, and others. (Occasionally)
  • POLS-Y 372 The Analysis of International Politics (3 cr.) An analysis of the nature and attributes of the nation-state and of international systems. The course also includes an analysis of nationalism, imperialism, the causes of war, sovereignty, international law, inter­national organizations, and major international issues. (Fall)
  • POLS-Y 373 The Politics of Terrorism (3 cr.) Examines the definition, history, logic, and political implications of terrorism. (Spring)
  • POLS-Y 381 Classical Political Thought (3 cr.) This course is not a history of political theory per se. Rather, it is an intensive study of selected works in ancient and medieval political philosophy including Plato's The Republic, Aristotle's Politics, Cicero's The Commonwealth, and St. Thomas Aquinas' The Laws. (Every other Fall)
  • POLS-Y 382 Modern Political Thought (3 cr.) Similarly to POLS-Y 381, this course is an intensive study of selected works in political philosophy of the so-called modern philosophers. These include Niccolò Machiavelli's The Prince, Thomas Hobbes' The Leviathan, John Locke's Second Treatise on Government, Jean-Jacques Rousseau's Treatise on the Origins of Inequality Among Men and The Social Contract, and Karl Marx's Communist Manifesto. (Every other Spring)
  • POLS-Y 383 American Political Ideas I (3 cr.) American political ideas from the colonial period to the founding period. (Occasionally)
  • POLS-Y 384 American Political Ideas II (3 cr.) American Political ideas from the founding period to the present. (Summer)
  • POLS-Y 385 Comparative Politics: Europe and Canada (3 cr.) A comparative analysis of four European countries and Canada —four seasoned democracies and Russia, whose political system is still in flux. Emphasis is placed on the political heritage of these countries, their governmental institutions, electoral systems, political party systems, and decision-making processes. (Occasionally)
  • POLS-Y 394 Public Policy Analysis (3 cr.) A study of the place of theory and method in examining public policies in relation to programs, institutional arrangements, and constitutional problems. Particular reference to American political experience. (Occasionally)
  • POLS-Y 398 Internship in Urban Institutions (3-6 cr.) This option, which requires the permission of a political science faculty, provides opportunities for students to observe and participate directly in the policy-making process of urban institutions requiring the assistance of paraprofessionals. Research and written reports are required. Evaluations will be made by both the agency and the faculty advisor. Students working in city and county institutions may repeat the course for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (Occasionally)
  • POLS-Y 401 Topics in Political Science (3 cr.) Topic varies with the instructor and year; consult the Schedule of Classes for current information. (Occasionally)
  • POLS-Y 480 Undergraduate Readings in Political Science (1-6 cr.) Individual readings and research. No more than 6 credit hours total may be taken. May be taken only with consent of instructor. (Fall or Spring)
  • POLS-Y 481 Field Experience in Political Science (1-6 cr.) Open to junior or senior majors only. Political science project approved by a faculty member. Faculty-directed study of aspects of the political process based upon field experience. Directed readings, field research, research paper. (Occasionally)
  • POLS-Y 490 Senior Seminar in Political Science (3 cr.) Required for majors in political science. Research paper on a selected topic approved by a political science faculty member required. (Fall or Spring)
  • POLS-Y 496 Foreign Study in Political Science (3 cr.) This course involves planning of research project during year preceding summer abroad. Time spent in research abroad must amount to at least one week for each credit hour granted. Research paper must be presented by end of semester following foreign study. (Occasionally)
  • POLS-Y 499 Honors Thesis (3 cr.) Requires the approval of a political science faculty and departmental honors advisor. (Occasionally)
Psychology (PSY)
  • PSY-B 309 Cooperative Work Experience— Psychology (1-3 cr.) P: consent of instructor and 15 credit hours of psychology. Experience in psychology- oriented work settings. Grade is determined on the basis of a written report and a supervisor's evaluation. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (Spring)
  • PSY-K 300 Statistical Analysis in Psychology (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 117, MATH-M 100 or equivalent, PSY-P 101, PSY-P 102. Use of statistics in psychological work, including ordering and manipulation of data, problems of statistical significance, elementary correlational methods, and analysis of variance and nonparametric methods. (Spring)
  • PSY-P 101 Introductory Psychology I (3 cr.) Introduction to psychology; its methods, data, and theoretical interpretations in areas of learning, sensory psychology, and psychophysiology. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
  • PSY-P 102 Introductory Psychology II (3 cr.) Continuation of PSY P101. Developmental, social, personality, and abnormal psychology (Fall, Spring, Summer)
  • PSY-P 211 Methods of Experimental Psychology (3 cr.) P: PSY P101 and PSY P102. Design and execution of simple experiments, treatment of results, search of the literature, and preparation of experimental reports. (Fall, Spring, Summer I)
  • PSY-P 216 Life Span Developmental Psychology (3 cr.) P: PSY P101 or PSY P102. A survey course that integrates the basic concepts of physical, cognitive, and psychosocial development from the prenatal period to death. Throughout the life span, theories, research, and critical issues in developmental psychology are explored with consideration of practical implications. Credit not given for both PSY P216 and PSY P316. (Fall, Spring)
  • PSY-P 303 Health Psychology (3 cr.) P: PSY P101 and PSY P102. Focuses on the role of psychological factors in health and illness. Through readings, lecture, and discussion, students will become better consumers of research on behavior-health interactions and develop a broad base of knowledge concerning how behaviors and other psychological factors can impact health both positively and negatively. (Occasionally)
  • PSY-P 314 Psychology of Adolescence (3 cr.) P: PSY P101 and PSY P102. Development of behavior in adolescence and emerging adulthood; factors which influence behavior. Credit not given for both PSY P216 and PSY P314. (Occasionally)
  • PSY-P 316 Psychology of Childhood and Adolescence (3 cr.) P: PSY P101 and PSY P102. Development of behavior in infancy, childhood, and youth; factors that influence behavior. (Fall) Credit not given for both PSY P216 and PSY 316. (Occasionally)
  • PSY-P 319 Psychology of Personality (3 cr.) P: PSY P101 and PSY P102. Methods and results of scientific study of personality. Basic concepts of personality traits and their measurement, developmental influences, problems of integration. (Occasionally)
  • PSY-P 320 Social Psychology (3 cr.) P: PSY P101 and PSY P102. Principles of scientific psychology applied to the individual in social situations. (Occasionally)
  • PSY-P 324 Abnormal Psychology (3 cr.) P: PSY P101 and PSY P102. A first course in abnormal psychology, with emphasis on forms of abnormal behavior, etiology, development, interpretation, and final manifestations. (Fall, Spring)
  • PSY-P 325 Psychology of Learning (3 cr.) P: PSY-P 101, PSY-P 102, PSY-K 300, PSY-P 211. Facts and principles of human and animal learning, especially as treated in theories attempting to provide framework for understanding what learning is and how it takes place. (Occasionally)
  • PSY-P 326 Behavioral Neuroscience (3 cr.) P: PSY P101 or PSY P102. R: BIOL L100 or BIOL L105. An examination of the cellular basis of behavior, emphasizing contemporary views and approaches to the study of the nervous system. Neural structure, function, and organization are considered in relation to sensory and motor function, motivation, learning, and other basic behaviors. (Occasionally)
  • PSY-P 327 Psychology of Motivation (3 cr.) P: PSY P101, PSY P102. How needs, desires, and incentives influence behavior; research on motivational processes in human and animal behavior, including ways in which motives change and develop. (Occasionally)
  • PSY-P 329 Sensation and Perception (3 cr.) P: PSY P101, PSY P102. Basic data, theories, psychophysics, illusions, and other topics fundamental to understanding sensory and perceptual processes. (Occasionally)
  • PSY-P 335 Cognitive Psychology (3 cr.) P: PSY P101, PSY P102. Introduction to human cognitive processes including attention and perception, memory, psycholinguistics, problem solving, and thinking. (Occasionally)
  • PSY-P 336 Psychological Tests and Individual Differences (3 cr.) P: PSY K300. Principles of psychological testing. Representative tests and their uses for evaluation and prediction. Emphasis on concepts of reliability, validity, standardization, norms, and item analysis. (Occasionally)
  • PSY-P 388 Special Topics in General Experimental Psychology (1-3 cr.) Study and analysis of selected psychological issues and problems in experimental psychology. Topics vary from semester to semester. May be repeated (total of 6 credit hours) with change in topics. (Occasionally)
  • PSY-P 389 Special Topics in Human Processes Psychology (1-3 cr.) Study and analysis of selected psychological issues and problems in human processes. Topics vary from semester to semester. May be repeated (total of 6 credit hours) with change in topics. (Occasionally)
  • PSY-P 390 Special Topics in Psychology (1-3 cr.) Study and analysis of selected psychological issues and problems. Topics vary from semester to semester. May be repeated (total of 6 credit hours) with change in topics. (Occasionally)
  • PSY-P 407 Drugs and the Nervous System (3 cr.) P: PSY-P 101, PSY-P 102 PSY-P 326 or permission of instructor. Introduction to the major psychoactive drugs and how they act upon the brain to influence behavior. Discussion of the role of drugs as therapeutic agents for various clinical disorders and as probes to provide insight into brain function. (Occasionally)
  • PSY-P 417 Animal Behavior (3 cr.) P: PSY-P 101, PSY-P 102. BIOL-L 101 and BIOL-L 102. Methods, findings, and interpretations of recent investigation of animal behavior. (Occasionally)
  • PSY-P 421 Laboratory in Social Psychology (3 cr.) P: PSY-K 300, PSY-P 211, PSY-P 320. Research methodology in the study of social behavior. (Occasionally)
  • PSY-P 423 Human Neuropsychology (3 cr.) P: PSY-P 326 or permission of instructor. A critical examination of neurological functioning with respect to human behavior. Assesses the behavioral functions of neural structures and systems through understanding the behavioral consequences of brain damage and through basic experimental study. (Occasionally)
  • PSY-P 424 Laboratory in Sensation and Perception (3 cr.) P: PSY-P 211, PSY-K 300, PSY-P 329. The experimental investigation of current and classical problems in sensory psychology and perception. (Occasionally)
  • PSY-P 425 Behavior Disorders of Childhood and Adolescence (3 cr.) P: PSY-P 324. A survey of major behavior disorders with emphasis on empirical research and clinical description relative to etiology, assessment, prognosis, and treatment. (Occasionally)
  • PSY-P 429 Laboratory in Developmental Psychology (3 cr.) P: PSY-P 211, PSY-K 300, and PSY-P 316, or PSY-P 314. Research methods in developmental psychology. (Occasionally)
  • PSY-P 430 Behavior Modification (3 cr.) P: junior standing and 9 credit hours of psychology, including PSY-P 324 and PSY-P 325. Principles, techniques, and applications of behavior modification including reinforcement, aversive conditioning, observational learning, desensitization, self-control, and modification of cognitions. (Occasionally)
  • PSY-P 432 Women and Madness (3 cr.) This course focuses on the historical and cultural factors and behaviors that have been associated with madness in women as well as on women's efforts to recover sanity and make sense of female experiences. (Occasionally)
  • PSY-P 435 Laboratory in Human Learning and Cognition (3 cr.) P: PSY-P 211, PSY-K 300, and PSY-P 325 or PSY-P 327 or PSY-P 335. Experimental study of human learning and cognitive processes. (Occasionally)
  • PSY-P 438 Language and Cognition (3 cr.) P: PSY-P 101, PSY-P 102,

    Methods, research, and theory in psycholinguistics. Examination of speech perception, speech production, psychological studies of syntax and semantics, language development, cognitive basis of linguistic theory, neurology of language, and language comprehension and thought.

  • PSY-P 456 Laboratory in Emotion and Motivation (3 cr.) P:  P211, K300, and P325 or P417.

    Experimental study of emotion and motivation (Occasionally).

  • PSY-P 458 Historical Approach to Psychological Systems (3 cr.) P: 12 credit hours of psychology. Origins and development of concepts and theories in science and philosophy that supplied the foundations of experimental psychology; an integrative description of psychological thought to the twentieth century. (Occasionally)
  • PSY-P 460 Women: A Psychological Perspective (3 cr.) P: 3 credit hours of psychology. Basic data and theories about the development and maintenance of sex differences in behavior and personality. (Occasionally)
  • PSY-P 493 Supervised Research I (2 cr.) P: PSY-P 101, PSY-P 211, PSY-K 300. Active participation in research. An independent experiment of modest magnitude, participation in ongoing research in a single laboratory. Students who enroll in PSY-P 493 will be expected to enroll in PSY-P 494. (Occasionally)
  • PSY-P 494 Supervised Research II (2 cr.) P: PSY-P 493. A continuation of PSY-P 493. Course will include a journal-type report of the two semesters of work. (Occasionally)
  • PSY-P 495 Reading and Research in Psychology (arr. cr.) P: consent of instructor. May be repeated twice for credit. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
Religious Studies (REL)
  • REL-R 160 Introduction to Religion in America (3 cr.) Traditional patterns of encounter with the sacred. Secularization of Western culture. Religious elements in contemporary American culture. (Fall, Spring)
  • REL-R 170 Religion, Ethics and Public Life (3 cr.) Western religious convictions and their consequences for judgments about personal and social morality, including such issues as sexual morality, medical ethics, questions of socioeconomic organization, and moral judgments about warfare. (Fall and Spring)
  • REL-R 300 Studies in Religion (3 cr.) Selected topics and movements in religion seen from an interdisciplinary viewpoint. May be repeated twice under different titles. (Occasionally)
  • REL-R 340 Contemporary Religious Thought (3 cr.) Interpretation of human destiny in contemporary religious and antireligious thought. (Occasionally)
Sociology (SOC)

Anthropology (ANTH) and Sociology (SOC) courses are listed in separate sections.

  • SOC-S 161 Principles of Sociology (3 cr.) Nature of interpersonal relationships, societies, groups, communities, and institutional areas such as the family, industry, and religion; social process operating within those areas; significance for problems of personality, human nature, social disorganization, and social change. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
  • SOC-S 163 Social Problems (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 161. Major social problems in areas such as the family; religion; economic order; crime; mental disorders; civil rights; racial, ethnic, and international tensions. Relation to structure and values of larger society (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
  • SOC-S 164 Marital Relations and Sexuality (3 cr.) Analysis of courtship, marriage, and its alternatives and the basic issues of human sexuality, with an emphasis on contemporary American society (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
  • SOC-S 210 Social Organization (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 161 or consent of instructor. An examination of the question of social order, including the perspectives of structure and function, conflict and change, social systems and institutions. (Occasionally)
  • SOC-S 215 Social Change (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 161 or consent of instructor. Introduction to theoretical and empirical studies of social change. Explores issues such as modernization; rationalization; demographic, economic, and religious causes of change; reform and revolution. (Fall, Summer)
  • SOC-S 230 Society and the Individual (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 161 or consent of instructor. Introduction to the concepts, perspectives, and theories of social psychology from the level of the individual to collective behavior. (Fall, Spring, Summer I)
  • SOC-S 254 Qualitative Field Research (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 161, SOC-S 261, and two courses in anthropology including ANTH-A 104. Covers the most salient aspects of field research, including taking field notes and coding, engaging in participant-observation, taking on a variety of research roles, creating topical guides and conducting in-depth interviews, and writing a publishable- quality research paper. Students must find a suitable setting in which to conduct their semester-long research project. (Fall)
  • SOC-S 261 Research Methods in Sociology (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 161 or consent of instructor. The logic of scientific work in sociology; theory construction; major research designs, including experiments, sample surveys, and ethnographic field studies; methods of sampling; measurement of variables. (Fall)
  • SOC-S 262 Statistics for Sociology (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 161 and MATH-M 100. This is a general introduction to the logic of statistics, both descriptive and inferential. Students learn how to use sample date to reach conclusions about a population of interest by calculating confidence intervals and significance tests. SPSS software is used to produce the appropriate calculations. (Spring)
  • SOC-S 309 The Community (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 161 or consent of instructor. Introduction to the sociology of community life, stressing the processes of order and change in community organization. Major topics include the community and society, the nonterritorial community, analysis of major community institutions, racial-ethnic differences in community behavior, community conflict, and community problems. (Occasionally)
  • SOC-S 310 The Sociology of Women in America (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 161 or consent of instructor. A brief survey of the history of women's changing role in America with particular emphasis on women's legal status in this century, persistence of occupational segregation, the organization and growth of the women's movement since 1960, the impact of those changes on the nuclear family, and the female self- image. (Occasionally)
  • SOC-S 311 Political Sociology (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 161 or consent of instructor. Interrelations of politics and society, with emphasis on formation of political power, its structure, and its change in different types of social systems and cultural-historical settings. (Occasionally)
  • SOC-S 313 Sociology of Religion (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 161 or consent of instructor. The nature, consequences, and theoretical origins of religion, as evident in social constructions and functional perspectives; the social origins and problems of religious organizations; and the relationships between religion and morality, science, magic, social class, minority status, economic development, and politics. (Occasionally)
  • SOC-S 314 Social Aspects of Health and Medicine (3 cr.) P: 6 credit hours of sociology. The effects of group characteristics in the causation, amelioration, and prevention of mental and physical illness, and social influences in medical education, medical practice, and hospital administration. (Occasionally— Two-year rotation)
  • SOC-S 315 Sociology of Work (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 161 or consent of instructor. Treats work roles within such organizations as factory, office, school, government, and welfare agencies; career and occupational mobility in work life; formal and informal organizations within work organizations; labor and management conflict and cooperation; problems of modern industrial workers. (Occasionally)
  • SOC-S 316 Sociology of the Family (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 161 or consent of instructor. Structure and process of the conjugal family in modern and emerging societies. Focus is on relationships of the family to other subsystems of the larger society and on interaction within the family in connection with those interrelationships. Stress on development of systematic theory. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
  • SOC-S 317 Social Stratification (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 161 or consent of instructor. Nature, functioning, and maintenance of systems of social stratification in local communities and societies. Correlates and consequences of social class position and vertical mobility. (Occasionally)
  • SOC-S 320 Deviant Behavior and Social Control (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 161 or consent of instructor. Analysis of deviance in relation to formal and informal social processes. Emphasis on deviance and respectability as functions of social relations, characteristics of rules, and power and conflict. (Occasionally—Once per year)
  • SOC-S 325 Criminology (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 161 or consent of instructor. Factors in genesis of crime and organization of criminal behavior from points of view of the person and the group. (Occasionally—Once per year)
  • SOC-S 328 Juvenile Delinquency (3 cr.) P: 6 credit hours of sociology, or SOC-S 161 and junior standing. Nature and extent of juvenile delinquency; juvenile delinquency and the law; methods of research in juvenile delinquency; delinquency causation; theories and practices of delinquency control. (Occasionally— Once per year)
  • SOC-S 331 Sociology of Aging (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 161 or consent of instructor. A survey of the demographic, work, retirement, social status, family, and institutional factors associated with life in the later years in modern industrial societies. (Occasionally— Two-year rotation)
  • SOC-S 335 Race and Ethnic Relations (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 161 or consent of instructor. Racial and cultural contacts, especially in America; factors that determine rate and manner of assimilation; cultural pluralism; theories and conceptual analysis of prejudice; comparative analysis of diverse race relations in different parts of the world. (Occasionally - 2 year rotation)
  • SOC-S 337 Women and Crime (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 161, at least sophomore standing or consent of instructor. Analysis of traditional and feminist theories of crime. Substantive areas include women's victimization, women's criminality and incarceration, and women working within the criminal justice system. (Occasionally-once per year)
  • SOC-S 340 Social Theory (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 161 and either SOC-S 210 or SOC-S 215 or consent of instructor. Sociological theory, with focus on content, form, and historical development. Relationships between theories, data, and sociological explanation. (Spring)
  • SOC-S 398 Internship in the Behavioral Sciences (3 cr.) P: departmental permission required. Open to sophomore, junior, and senior students who, upon approval of the internship coordinator, are placed in cooperating social, welfare, and behavior modification agencies to receive experience as learning paraprofessionals. The department and agency supervise the work. Research and written reports are required. Evaluations by the agency and department will be made. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours. (Occasionally)
  • SOC-S 410 Topics in Social Organization (3 cr.) P: 6 credit hours of sociology or consent of instructor. Specific topics announced each semester; e.g., social stratification, formal organizations, urban social organization, education, religion, sport and leisure, medicine, politics, demography, social power, social conflict, social change, comparative social systems. May be repeated three times for credit. (Occasionally)
  • SOC-S 416 The Family (3 cr.) P: 6 credit hours of sociology. The family as a social institution, changing family folkways, the family in relation to the development of personality of its members, disorganization of the family, and predicting success and failure in marriage. (Occasionally)
  • SOC-S 418 The Sociology of Political and Religious Movements (3 cr.) P: 6 credit hours of sociology or consent of instructor. Religious and political movements across the political spectrum will be explored to examine the interrelationships between religious and political social institutions. Transformation of those relationships throughout history will be explored to note the effects of the changing sociopolitical climate in the U.S. on social movement formation and convergence. (Occasionally)
  • SOC-S 419 Social Movements and Collective Action (3 cr.) P: SOC S215 or consent of department. Change- oriented social and political collective action and consequences for groups and societies. Resource mobilization, historical and comparative analysis of contemporary movements and collective action. (Occasionally)
  • SOC-S 420 Topics in Deviance (3 cr.) P: 6 credit hours of sociology or consent of instructor. Specific topics announced each semester; e.g., crime, juvenile delinquency, law enforcement, corrections, mental illness, sexual deviance, drug use, violence, and physical disability. May be repeated three times for credit. (Occasionally)
  • SOC-S 431 Topics in Social Psychology (3 cr.) P: SOC S161 and ANTH A104 or consent of instructor. R: SOC S230. Specific topics announced each semester, e.g., socialization, personality development, small-group structures and processes, interpersonal relations, language and human behavior, attitude formation and change, collective behavior, public opinion. May be repeated three times for credit with a different topic. (Occasionally)
  • SOC-S 441 Topics in Social Theory (3 cr.) P: SOC S161 and an additional course in sociology, or consent of instructor. R: SOC S215. Specific topics announced each semester; e.g., structuralism, evolutionary theory, symbolic interaction theory, functionalism, social action theory, exchange theory, history and development of social theory, sociology of knowledge. May be repeated three times for credit. (Fall—odd years)
  • SOC-S 447 Theories of Social Change (3 cr.) P: 6 credit hours of sociology or consent of instructor. Idea of progress; linear philosophy of history; social and cultural evolution; contemporary theories. (Occasionally)
  • SOC-S 450 Topics in Methods and Measurement (3 cr.) P: SOC S261, SOC S262; or consent of instructor. Specific topics announced each semester; e.g., logic of inquiry, model construction and formalization, research design, data collection, sampling, measurement, statistical analysis. May be repeated three times for credit with a different topic. (Occasionally)
  • SOC-S 495 Individual Readings in Sociology (1-6 cr.) Prior arrangement, usually in conjunction with honors work. (Independent study and internship program.) (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
Spanish (SPAN)
  • SPAN-S 100 Elementary Spanish I (4 cr.) Introduction to present-day Spanish, basic structural patterns, functional vocabulary, and selected aspects of Hispanic civilizations and cultures. (Fall, Spring, and Summer I)
  • SPAN-S 150 Elementary Spanish II (4 cr.) P: SPAN S100 or equivalent Introduction to present-day Spanish, basic structural patterns, functional vocabulary, and selected aspects of Hispanic civilizations and cultures. (Fall, Spring, and Summer II)
  • SPAN-S 160 Spanish for Health Care Personnel (3 cr.) Students learn to explain procedures, medication, and diagnoses when faced with a variety of medical situations involving Spanish-speaking patients and families. Through vocabulary, grammar, illustrations, dialogues, exercises, and cultural notes, the course prepares health professionals to communicate better with Spanish-speaking patients. May be taken concurrently with other Spanish language courses, but cannot serve as a replacement for any of these courses and does not satisfy College of Arts and Sciences foreign language requirements. (Occasionally)
  • SPAN-S 200 Second-Year Spanish I (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 150 or equivalent. Continuation of SPAN-S 100 - SPAN-S 150, with increased emphasis on communication skills and selected readings on aspects of Hispanic culture. (Fall, Spring, Summer I)
  • SPAN-S 205 Spanish for Health Care Personnel (3 cr.) P: SPAN S160 or SPAN S100, or equivalent. Students learn to explain procedures, medication, and diagnoses when faced with a variety of medical situations involving Spanish-speaking patients and families. Through vocabulary, grammar, illustrations, dialogues, exercises, and cultural notes, the course prepares health professionals to communicate better with Spanish-speaking patients. May be taken concurrently with other Spanish language courses, but cannot serve as a replacement for any of these courses and does not satisfy College of Arts and Sciences foreign language requirements. (Occasionally)
  • SPAN-S 230 Cervantes' Don Quixote in Translation (3 cr.) Detailed textual analysis of Cervantes' masterpiece, with readings and class discussion on its relationship to the Renaissance and the development of the world novel. No credit in Spanish. (Occasionally)
  • SPAN-S 231 Spanish-American Fiction in Translation (3 cr.) Reading and discussion of selected novels and short stories in English translation. Emphasis on cultural values as expressed through the work of representative Spanish-American prose fiction writers. No credit in Spanish. (Occasionally)
  • SPAN-S 240 Modern Spanish Literature in Translation (3 cr.) Readings from authors such as Unamuno, Cela, Alonso, Garcia Lorca, Jimenez, Perez de Ayala, and Ortega y Gasset. No credit in Spanish. (Occasionally)
  • SPAN-S 241 Golden Age Literature in Translation (3 cr.) Masterpieces of Spanish literature of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Representative authors include Lope de Vega, Cervantes, Garcilaso, Quevedo, Calderón, Fray Luis de Leon, San Juan de la Cruz, and Góngora. No credit in Spanish. (Occasionally)
  • SPAN-S 250 Second-Year Spanish II (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 200 or equivalent. Continuation of SPAN S200, with increased emphasis on communication skills and selected readings on aspects of Hispanic culture. (Fall, Spring, Summer II)
  • SPAN-S 251 Modern Spain (3 cr.) The culture of Spain from 1700 to the present: painting, sculpture, architecture, tauromachy, manners, and customs. No credit in Spanish. (Occasionally)
  • SPAN-S 260 Introduction to Hispanic Film (3 cr.) Hispanic culture in film. Cinematic techniques used to portray Hispanic culture. No credit in Spanish. (Occasionally)
  • SPAN-S 284 Women in Hispanic Culture (3 cr.) Images, roles, and themes involving women in Hispanic literature. No credit in Spanish. (Occasionally)
  • SPAN-S 290 Topics in Hispanic Culture (3 cr.) Emphasis on one topic, author, or genre in Hispanic culture. May be repeated once for credit with a different topic. No credit in Spanish.  May be repeated once for credit with a different topic. (Occasionally)
  • SPAN-S 311 Spanish Grammar (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 250 or equivalent. This course is designed to integrate the four basic language skills into a review of the major points of Spanish grammar. Course work will combine grammar exercises with brief compositions based on a reading assignment and class discussion in Spanish. Sentence exercises will be corrected and discussed in class. (Fall)
  • SPAN-S 312 Written Composition in Spanish (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 250 or equivalent. This course integrates the four basic language skills into a structured approach to composition. Some review of selected points of Spanish grammar will be included. Each student will write a weekly composition, increasing in length as the semester progresses. Emphasis will be on correct usage, vocabulary building, and stylistic control. (Spring)
  • SPAN-S 317 Spanish Conversation and Diction (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 250 or equivalent. Intensive controlled conversation correlated with readings, reports, debates, and group discussions. May be repeated once for credit.  May be repeated once for credit (Fall, Summer II)
  • SPAN-S 323 Introduction to Translating Spanish and English (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 312 or equivalent. A comparative study of the style and grammar of both languages, with a focus on the difficulties involved in translating. Introduction to the techniques and process of translation through intensive practice. (Occasionally)
  • SPAN-S 360 Introduction to Hispanic Literature (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 250 or equivalent. Using fiction, drama, and poetry from Spain and Latin America, this course introduces strategies to increase reading comprehension and presents terms and concepts useful in developing the critical skills of literary analysis. (Fall)
  • SPAN-S 363 Introduction to Hispanic Culture (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 250 or equivalent. Introduction to the cultural history of Spanish-speaking countries with the emphasis on its literary, artistic, social, economic, and political aspects. (Occasionally)
  • SPAN-S 408 Survey of Spanish Literature II (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 301 - SPAN-S 302. An historical survey of Spanish literature that covers the main current of Spain's literary history in the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries. Readings in prose, poetry, and drama by Larra, Perez Galdos, Unamuno, Lorca, and other representative writers. (Occasionally)
  • SPAN-S 409 Topics in Spanish Language (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 311 or consent of instructor. Studies in special topics not ordinarily covered in other departmental courses. Topics may include the linguistic analysis of the structure of Spanish (syntax, phonology, morphology), aspects of bilingualism, and language and usage as they pertain to teaching.  May be repeated once for credit. (Occasionally) 
  • SPAN-S 410 Contemporary Hispanic Culture and Conversation (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 317 or equivalent. Preparation and presentation of oral reports; group discussions. Topic may vary. Goals are to maintain and develop oral proficiency and to examine some aspect of contemporary Hispanic civilization. Written research projects may be required. May be repeated once with permission of instructor. (Occasionally)
  • SPAN-S 411 Spanish Culture and Civilization (3 cr.) P: SPAN S360 or SPAN S363 or equivalent. A course to integrate historical, social, political, and cultural information about Spain. (Occasionally)
  • SPAN-S 412 Spanish America: Cultural Context (3 cr.) P: SPAN S360 or SPAN S363 or equivalent. A course to integrate historical, social, political, and cultural information about Spanish America. (Occasionally)
  • SPAN-S 413 Hispanic Culture in the U.S. (3 cr.) P: SPAN S360 or SPAN S363 or equivalent. The Hispanic heritage of the United States. Hispanic-American art, music, architecture, popular culture, and language. (Occasionally)
  • SPAN-S 420 Modern Spanish-American Prose Fiction (3 cr.) P: SPAN S360 or equivalent. Spanish-American prose fiction from late nineteenth-century modernism to the present. (Occasionally)
  • SPAN-S 421 Advanced Grammar and Composition (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 311 - SPAN-S 312 or equivalent. Selected grammar review and intensive practice in effective use of the written language. (Occasionally)
  • SPAN-S 423 The Craft of Translation (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 323 or equivalent. Basic introductory course in translation. The problems and techniques of Spanish/English and English/Spanish translation using a variety of texts and concentrating on such critical areas as stylistics, tone, rhythms, imagery, nuance, and allusion. (Occasionally)
  • SPAN-S 426 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 311 or consent of instructor. General aspects of Spanish linguistics: traditional, descriptive, historical, and dialectal. (Occasionally)
  • SPAN-S 428 Applied Spanish Linguistics (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 311 or consent of instructor. Analysis of linguistics and cultural elements ofSpanish phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics as they bear on teaching. (Occasionally)
  • SPAN-S 435 Literatura chicana y puertorriqueria (3 cr.) P: SPAN S360 or equivalent. Reading and discussion of works produced in Spanish by representative Chicano, Puerto Rican, and Cuban authors of the United States. Cultural values and traditions that are reflected in the oral and written literature will be studied. (Occasionally) 
  • SPAN-S 470 Women and Hispanic Literature (3 cr.) P: SPAN S360 or equivalent. The Hispanic woman and her cultural context as seen through literary texts. Topics include female authors, images of women in literature, and feminist criticism. (Occasionally) 
  • SPAN-S 474 Hispanic Literature and Society (3 cr.) P: SPAN S360 or equivalent. Writers and their works within the social, political, economic, and cultural context. Specific topic to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. (Occasionally)  
  • SPAN-S 479 Mexican Literature (3 cr.) P: SPAN S360 or equivalent. Mexican literature from independence to present. (Occasionally)  
  • SPAN-S 490 Topics in Hispanic Literature (3 cr.) P: SPAN S360 or equivalent. Examination of various areas of Spanish and Spanish-American literature. May be repeated for credit as topics change. Specific topic to be announced in Schedule of Classes. (Occasionally)   
  • SPAN-S 494 Individual Readings in Hispanic Studies (1-3 cr.) P: consent of department May be repeated. (Fall, Spring)    May be repeated
  • SPAN-S 495 Hispanic Colloquium (3 cr.) Topic to be selected by the faculty member offering the course.  May be repeated twice for credit as long as the topic is different. 
Speech (SPCH)
  • SPCH-S 121 Public Speaking (3 cr.) Theory and practice of public speaking: training in thought processes necessary to organize speech content; analysis of components of effective delivery and language. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
  • SPCH-S 122 Interpersonal Communication (3 cr.) Practical consideration of spontaneous human interaction in face-to-face situations. Special attention to perception, language, and attitudes in dyads and small groups. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
  • SPCH-S 223 Business and Professional Speaking (3 cr.) P: SPCH S121 or consent of instructor. Preparation and presentation of speeches and oral reports appropriate to business and professional occupations; group discussion and parliamentary procedures. Does not count toward fulfillment of arts and sciences Group III distribution requirements. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
  • SPCH-S 313 Performance as Communicative Practice (3 cr.) P: SPCH S121 or S122. Introduction to performance as a communicative practice, focusing on performance as a special artistic mode of communication and performance and as a special class of display events in which the values and symbols of a culture and enacted before an audience.
  • SPCH-S 322 Advanced Interpersonal Communication (3 cr.) P: SPCH S122. Advanced consideration of communication in human relationships. Emphasis given to self-concept, perception, language, nonverbal interaction, listening, interpersonal conflict, and communication skills in family, social, and work situations. (Occasionally)
  • SPCH-S 329 Discussion and Group Methods (3 cr.) P: SPCH S122 or consent of the instructor. Leadership and participation in group, committee, conference, and public discussion; logical and psychological aspects of group processes. (Occasionally)
  • SPCH-S 336 Current Topics in Communication (3 cr.) P: Junior standing or consent of instructor. Extensive analysis of selected problems in contemporary speech communication. Topics vary each semester and are listed in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated once for credit. (Occasionally)
  • SPCH-S 398 Independent Study in Speech Communication (3 cr.) P: Junior standing and approval of instructor. Independent study or practicum experience. Projects must be approved by a faculty member before enrolling. May be repeated up to a total of 6 credits. (Occasionally)
  • SPCH-S 400 Senior Seminar in Speech (3 cr.) P: Senior standing and a minimum of 21 credit hours completed in the major. Study of problems and issues in speech communication. Capstone course. (Spring)
  • SPCH-S 405 Human Communication Theory (3 cr.) P: SPCH S121, S122 and junior standing. Survey of contemporary theories of human communication, with emphasis on the nature of theory construction and contribution of allied disciplines to communication theory. (Occasionally)
  • SPCH-S 414 Topics in Performance Studies and Cultural Communication (3 cr.) P: SPCH S121 or S122. Examination of the relationship between performance and culture in specific domains of social life and aspects of communicative experience. May be repeated with different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.
  • SPCH-S 424 Empirical Research Methods in Speech Communication (3 cr.) P: SPCH S121, SPCH S122, junior standing and one mathematics course at the 100- level or above. Focuses on the objective appraisal of behavioral data in the study of speech communica­tion. Introduces the theoretical foundations of empirical social science and offers guidelines for conducting descriptive and experimental studies. (Occasionally)
  • SPCH-S 427 Cross-Cultural Communication (3 cr.) P: Junior standing or consent of instructor. A survey study of national, cultural, and cross-cultural communication in theory and practice. (Occasionally)
  • SPCH-S 440 Organizational Communication (3 cr.) P: SPCH S223 or consent of instructor. Examination of internal and external communication in business and other professional organizations, with emphasis upon theory, techniques, practices, goals, and the social environment in which such communication exists. (Occasionally)
  • SPCH-S 450 Gender and Communication (3 cr.) P: SPCH S121 or SPCH S122 or consent of the instructor. Examines the extent to which biological sex and gender-role orientation and stereotypes influence the process of communication. Focuses on gender differences in decoding and encoding verbal and nonverbal behavior, development of sex roles, cultural assumptions, and stereotypes in communication. Analyzes how the media present, influence, and reinforce gender stereotypes. (Fall, Spring)
  • SPCH-S 480 Personal Narrative Performance (3 cr.) P: SPCH S122. This course is designed to increase understanding of the vocabularies, theory, philosophy and empirical knowledge central to the study of narrative communication. Emphasis is placed on performance as a way of knowing and as a method of communication research through gathering, transcribing and re-performing personal narratives.
  • SPCH-S 490 Profession Practice Internship (3 cr.) P: Junior or senior standing, 21 credit hours of completed communication courses, a 3.0 grade point average in the major, an overall grade point average of 2.5, faculty supervision, and departmental approval. (Occasionally)
Telecommunications (TEL)
  • TEL-C 200 Introduction to Mass Communication (3 cr.) Survey of function, responsibilities, and influence of various mass communication media. Directed toward the consumer and critic of mass media in modern society. (Occasionally)
  • TEL-R 308 Radio Production and Directing (3 cr.) P: TEL C200. Fundamentals of Radio Production and Directing.
Theatre (THTR)
  • THTR-T 100 Introduction to Theatre (3 cr.) Exploration of theatre as a collaborative art.  Investigation of the dynamics and creativity of theatre production through plays, theatrical space, and cultural context, with particular attention to the roles and interaction of the audience, playwrights, directors, actors, designers, producers and critics.  (Fall, Spring)
  • THTR-T 120 Acting I (3 cr.) Introduction to theories and methodology through sensory awareness, physical and vocal exercises, improvisations, and scene study.  Lecture and laboratory. (Fall, Spring)
  • THTR-T 168 Theatre Production (1-2 cr.) The study and application of theatre practices. Students will be assigned to all levels of departmental production for applied practice. Six credit hours required for Theatre Major. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
  • THTR-T 220 Acting II (3 cr.) P: THTR T120 and consent of instructor. Techniques for expressing physical, intellectual, and emotional objectives.  Study, creation and performance from varied dramas.  Lecture and laboratory.  (Fall or Spring)
  • THTR-T 225 Stagecraft I (3 cr.) Introduction to theories, methodology, and skills: analysis of practical and aesthetic functions of stage scenery, fundamentals of scenic construction and rigging, mechanical drawing for stagecraft. Lecture and laboratory. (Fall, Spring)
  • THTR-T 228 Design for the Theatre (3 cr.) An overview of design principles and practices in all areas of theatre production. Emphasis on those aspects of design that are common to work in scenery, costumes, and lighting. (Spring)
  • THTR-T 230 Costume Design and Technology (3 cr.) Introduction to theories, methodology, and skills for costume design for the theatre, with laboratory component in basic costume technology skills and wardrobe.  (Occasionally)
  • THTR-T 302 Musical Theatre (3 cr.) A history and analysis of musical comedy and revue from its origins to the present. The musical theatre looked on as a mirror of social, political, and cultural values. (Occasionally)
  • THTR-T 310 Creative Dramatics (3 cr.) Theory and technique of guiding children in spontaneous activity, specifically, creating scenes or plays and performing them with improvised dialogue and action.  Although theories will be discussed, the emphasis will be on practical activities that may be useful to prospective teachers, recreation leaders, etc. (Occasionally)
  • THTR-T 320 Acting III (3 cr.) P: THTR T220 and consent of instructor. Character analysis and use of language on stage. Exploration of character through intensive scene study.  Lecture and laboratory.  (Occasionally)
  • THTR-T 325 Voice and Speech (3 cr.) Introduction to voice production.  Emphasizes relaxation, breathing, the production of vocal sounds; addresses vocal habits and cultural holds through exercises and workouts with the goal of freeing the voice and redeveloping a passion for language. (Occasionally)
  • THTR-T 326 Scene Design I (3 cr.) P: THTR T228. Introduction to process of scene design, scene designer's responsibilities, scene problem solving, and exploration of visual materials and forms. (Occasionally)
  • THTR-T 335 Stage Lighting Design (3 cr.) P: THTR T228. Introduction to theories, methodology, and skills; instruments and their use, control of light, practical applications. Lecture and laboratory. (Occasionally)
  • THTR-T 337 Dramaturgy (3 cr.) The application of critical and research skills in performance situations. Student dramaturges work in collaboration with directors, producers, and playwrights in preparing scripts for rehearsal, documenting period styles and norms, researching production histories, and critiquing the social implications of the performance arts. (Occasionally)
  • THTR-T 340 Directing I (3 cr.) P: THTR T120 or THTR T228, or consent of instructor. Introduction to theories, methodology, and skills: play analysis, working with actors, basic elements of stage composition. (Fall or Spring)
  • THTR-T 390 Creative Work in Summer Theatre (1-3 cr.) P: Consent of department chairperson. Work in summer theatre productions. May be repeated once for credit. (Occasionally)
  • THTR-T 392 Theatre Internship (3 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. THTR T392 Theatre Internship (3 cr.) P: consent of instructor. Training and practice at a professional theatre or venue approved by the theatre faculty.
  • THTR-T 410 Movement for the Theatre (3 cr.) P: THTR T120. Introduction to fundamental principles and methods focusing on kinesthetic awareness, posture, flexibility, coordination, relaxation, and physical characterization. (Occasionally)
  • THTR-T 420 Acting IV (3 cr.) P: THTR T320 and consent of instructor. Emphasis on ensemble acting and contrasting styles. Study and performance of characters in scenes from Ibsen, Chekhov, Strindberg, and classical Greek dramas. Lecture and laboratory. (Occasionally)
  • THTR-T 424 Stagecraft II (3 cr.) P: THTR T225 or consent of instructor. History of stagecraft, stage mechanics, and perspective drawing. Lecture and laboratory. (Occasionally)
  • THTR-T 426 Scene Design II (3 cr.) P: THTR T326 or consent of instructor. Work in line, color, and composition using historical conventions as the basis for contemporary scenic statements. Emphasis on period style and presentational forms. (Occasionally)
  • THTR-T 430 Stage Costuming II (3 cr.) P: THTR T230 or consent of instructor. Pattern drafting, fabric selection, special construction problems, design and management of costume shops, and care of wardrobes. (Occasionally)
  • THTR-T 438 Lighting Design (3 cr.) P: THTR T228 or THTR T335 or consent of instructor. Stage lighting design concept, development and implementation. Advanced lighting techniques and approaches. (Occasionally)
  • THTR-T 442 Directing II: Script Analysis (3 cr.) P: THTR T340 and THTR T228. Problems and functions of director from selection of script through performance. Emphasis on script analysis. Lecture and practical projects. (Occasionally)
  • THTR-T 446 Theatre for Children (3 cr.) Purposes, principles, and problems of staging plays for young people. (Occasionally)
  • THTR-T 470 History of the Theatre I (3 cr.) The study of theatre history, performance, and dramatic literature from the primitive eras through the Renaissance. Emphasis is on the relationship of theatre and its society. (Occasionally)
  • THTR-T 471 History of the Theatre II (3 cr.) The study of theatre history, performance, and dramatic literature form 1660 to the present. Emphasis is on the relationship of theatre to its society. (Occasionally)
  • THTR-T 483 Topics in Theatre and Drama (1-3 cr.) Studies in special topics not ordinarily covered in other departmental courses. May be repeated once for credit if topic differs. (Occasionally)
  • THTR-T 490 Independent Study in Theatre and Drama (3-6 cr.) THTR T490 Independent Study in Theatre and Drama (3-6 cr.) P: majors only, senior standing and consent of instructor. Creative projects and performances in the area of student's special interest. (Fall, Spring)
Women's Studies (WGS)
  • WGS-W 200 Women in American Society (3 cr.) An interdisciplinary course, taught from the perspective of the social and behavioral sciences, which introduces the "core" discipline areas and methodological/bibliographical tools required to do research in Women's and Gender Studies. Emphasis is on the roles, socialization, and political background of women in contemporary American society; using both literature and social science research to illuminate the present status of women. Credit will not be given for both WGS W200 and WGS W201. (Occasionally)
  • WGS-W 201 Women in American Culture (3 cr.) An interdisciplinary course that introduces students to "core" discipline areas and methodological/bibliographical tools required to do research in Women's and Gender Studies. Taught from the humanities perspective, emphasis is on the roles, images, and history of women in American culture, and on the social experiences that have influenced the lives of contemporary women. Credit cannot be earned for both WGS W200 and WGS W201. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
  • WGS-W 207 Women and Literature (3 cr.) Critical issues and methods in the study of women writers and treatment of women in British and American literature. (Occasionally)
  • WGS-W 300 Topics in Women's and Gender Studies (3 cr.) An interdisciplinary study of selected ideas, trends, and problems in women's and gender studies from a social science perspective. (Occasionally)
  • WGS-W 301 International Perspectives on Women (3 cr.) Feminist analysis of women's legal, social, and economic status in two or more cultures other than those of the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and Europe. Interdisciplinary approach. May be repeated once with a different topic. (Occasionally)
  • WGS-W 302 Issues in Women's and Gender Studies (3 cr.) Interdisciplinary approach to selected ideas, trends and problems in WGS from a humanities perspective.  Specific issues announced in the schedule of classes.  (Fall, Spring)
  • WGS-W 400 Topics in Women's and Gender Studies (topic varies) (3-6 cr.) P: WGS W200 or WGS W201 or consent of instructor. Interdisciplinary approach to selected ideas, trends, and problems in Women's and Gender Studies from a social sciences perspective. Specific topics to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
  • WGS-W 401 Topics in Women's and Gender Studies (topic varies) (3-6 cr.) Interdisciplinary approach to selected ideas, trends, and problems in Women's and Gender Studies from a humanities perspective. Specific topics to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. (Fall, Spring)
  • WGS-W 480 Women's and Gender Studies Practicum (3 cr.) Internships in the Women's and Gender Studies Program are offered to provide opportunities for students to gain work experience while serving women's needs. This experience is combined with an academic analysis of women's status and experience in organizations. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

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